Trek unveils new Émonda line, the ‘lightest production bike ever’

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Trek sure has its bases covered. The classic Madone has morphed into a cutting edge aerodynamic frame, the innovative Domane has one of the smoothest rides around, and now the Émonda line takes light weight to new heights. Starting with a Shimano Tiagra equipped S4 model with a carbon frame for $1,650, the line tops out with the astonishing 10.25 pound SLR10 that checks in at an equally eye-popping $15,750 price tag.

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Trek says the word Émonda itself comes from the French verb émonder, to “prune or strip away”, though it is of course also an anagram of Madone and Domane. It is (relatively) easy to make a super light bike, but Trek put a priority on ride quality and builds each bike with size-specific tubing so the ride remains consistent across the size range—from 50cm to 62cm. There are 18 models in all, with five Women’s Specific Design models.

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With a frame that weighs just 690 grams and a fork at 280 grams, nearly half of the Émonda lineup comes it at or below the UCI’s 6.8kg weight limit for race bikes. That said, expect to see the entire Trek Factory Racing team aboard this bike at the start of the Tour de France this weekend. How did the production bike get so light? Well beyond the super light frame, it uses some insanely trick Tune wheels, saddle and finishing bits, a full SRAM Red group, plus all the top-of-the-line parts from Bontrager.

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While the geometry and design of the Émonda frame carries through the full lineup, there are actually three levels. The SLR is the aforementioned superlight, built from Trek’s 700 series carbon, while the SL frame uses 500 series carbon and the S frame has 300 series. The SLR models also use the new Shimano direct mount rim brakes, while the SL and S models use standard brake calipers. The SLR and SL framesets are also available on their own.

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We have a Émonda on the way for a long-term analysis, so check back soon for some of our first impressions.

 

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