Field Tested: Light & Motion Urban 800

Light & Motion knows a thing or three about building sturdy bike lights—after all the company got its start building dive lights and still manufactures all its products in Monterey, California.

The Urban 800 is a wonderfully versatile little light—and I do mean little. One inch in diameter and four inches long, it’s about the size of a fat lipstick tube. It also weighs just 122 grams, so it disappears when mounted on your helmet with the included helmet mount. Charging is handled through an included micro USB cable.


The 800 lumens are more than enough to show you the way, and when dimmed to low (175 lumens) it will run for six hours. The single CREE LED shines through a round reflector for a fairly standard beam pattern, but it is more than bright enough to spot potholes in the dark. You don’t have to worry about riding it in the rain either, as it is rated to be submerged in one meter of water for up to 30 minutes (though from the demonstrations I’ve seen, it will last even longer.)

On the sides are two amber lights that help increase visibility from the side, but they can also be turned off if you don’t want to use them. The stretchy rubber mount stayed put on a variety of handlebars, and the unit can swivel freely 360 degrees. New for this year is a removable mount that uses the GoPro interface for a clean mount on various other accessories. It can also be used as a flashlight with the included finger mount and lanyard.


Add up all these features and the Urban 800 is my new favorite bike light. It is just one in a whole lineup of Urban models from Light & Motion starting with the $60 Urban 350. Pick which one is right for you and you won’t be sorry.

Vital stats

  • Price: $129
  • Weight: 122 grams
  • Output: 800 lumens
  • Claimed runtimes: High – 1.5 hours, Medium – 3 hours, Low – 6 hours, Flash – 120 hours.

Bike2Power releases hub-mounted dynamo USB charger


If this thing works as advertised it could get a lot of people pretty charged up. (Sorry, that was some dynamo humor.)

Anyway, Bike2Power has released a hub-mounted dynamo that can be used on nearly any existing bike, has a built-in light, and can charge USB devices. Unlike some similar devices that require a dedicated dynamo hub, the BikeCharge Dynamo can be installed on almost any front or rear wheel and the lights can be set to high, low or blinking modes.


By cacheing the power in a 1,100 mAh battery pack, it can charge devices like smartphones, which are notoriously picky about power draw. The battery means it will continue to power your device even when the bike is stopped, such as at a red light, without interruption.

I predict these types of devices are going to be big in the next few years as more touring and city cyclists want to bring their gadgets with them. I’m also intrigued because it will fit on fat bikes with extra-wide front hubs


At $119 it’s a lot less expensive than a dynamo wheel, and can be switched from bike to bike. The best part is that if it doesn’t fit your bike, they will even take it back for a full refund within 30 days.

We’re going to try and get our hands on one to review, so stay tuned.


An earlier version of this story stated that there are no dynamo hubs available to fit fat bikes. However, the Son 28 135 is in fact available to fit fat bike forks with “rear” rotor spacing.

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