Field Tested: Traitor Cycles Slot

From Issue #37

With the Slot, Traitor Cycles set out to create a bicycle that could transition easily between urban commuter and off-road explorer. The idea was to have a bike that could be ridden through the city, to the trailhead, and continue into the wilderness without sacrificing too much from any one experience. Traitor is definitely targeting a rider who wants a do-it-all bike and doesn’t need a more robust mountain bike.

Traitor Slot

The Slot is made from steel and features a decent component group built from a mix of SRAM and Shimano throughout. The 44/32/22 chainrings matched to a 9-speed, 11-34 cassette provided me with a gear for just about every situation, and it all costs less than some of the more modern single and double crank setups.

The stock Avid BB5 brakes and 160 mm rotors are OK; I’m sure the BB5 brakes help to hit the price point, but I missed the adjustability of the BB7 versions and would have liked a larger rotor up front. Swapping rotors is a cheap and easy upgrade that you can do yourself, if needed. Traitor deserves a shout-out for the rear brake placement inside the stays so that it doesn’t interfere with mounting a rack or fender. Nice.

Traitor Slot 3Speaking of touring, the Slot has braze-ons for front and rear racks, fenders and two water bottle cages. The front rack mounts are compatible with low-rider racks like the Tubus Tara. The down tube/ head tube junction has been formed so that even the smaller-sized Slots can accommodate an under-the- down-tube bottle and fender while still using 29-inch wheels. A water bottle under the down tube can get a bit crusty while touring, but it’s useful if you decide to outfit the bike with a frame pack and thus lose the use of cage mounts inside the front triangle.

For rubber, Traitor chose 29×2.1-inch Kenda Small Block Eights. While not the best tire for muddy or wet trails, they did an admirable job in most situations. I found them to be a perfect choice for a bike that is going to be jumping back and forth from the street, to gravel, to dirt. If you want to install full fenders you’ll have to swap out the 2.1s as the Slot will only accommodate up to a 700×45 mm tire with your splash guards on.

When I took it into the woods, the Slot did reasonably well on singletrack. Without bags, it performed just as you would expect a full rigid steel bike to. Without power lost to shock or fork compression, the bike felt efficient, albeit a bit rough in some of the more technical sections of the trail. And as long as the route up the hill wasn’t too muddy, it climbed like a champ.

Loaded up with bags and gear, the Slot didn’t flinch. Of course the weight slowed my progress down, but the frame handled the increased bulk well and I didn’t notice any unwelcome flex or loss of maneuverability. Even on some of the more challenging trails the bike felt well balanced and comfortable. The frame is compatible with an 80 mm suspension fork, but Traitor has also been mulling over selling a version with a suspension fork. I have a feeling that would be just plain awesome.

Traitor Slow 2The bike really showed its worth when it transitioned from riding on a dirt trail to asphalt or gravel. Without any fanfare it just kept trucking along. I took the Slot on some pretty substantial rides with varying types of terrain and it performed as well as I could ask for from a multisurface rig. Long 17.9-inch chainstays and a low bottom bracket kept the bike stable in the dirt and the tires were able to crunch along gravel and roll pretty well along the smoother routes I explored.

The only real problem I had was with the seatpost clamp. I could never get the quick release mechanism to stay tight enough and the 26.8 mm seatpost slipped a bit while traversing rougher roads. I would suggest switching to a bolt-on collar if you experience the same. While Joel DeJong, the general manager at Traitor cycles, wasn’t aware of this issue, he stated they will likely change the post to the more standard 27.2 mm size with the next run of frames.

I really have to hand it to Traitor Cycles. They did a fantastic job building a reasonably priced, great-looking bike that can handle a wide range of terrain and activities. If you are in the market for a bike that you can ride to work or the store, tackle moderate singletrack, and take on tour I definitely recommend looking at the Slot.

  • Price: $1,399
  • Weight: 29.7 pounds
  • Sizes: S, M, L (tested), XL
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First impressions: Traitor Cycles Slot


The Slot from Traitor Cycles was born from the idea of a bike that could get you to the trailhead, carve some singletrack, then stop on the way home for groceries. Of course there’s the old adage “Jack of all trades, master of none,” so I am interested how well this bike will fulfill all its varied roles.


Built from steel, the Slot is fully rigid 29er and features mounts for racks and fenders fore and aft, and of course a couple of bottle cages. There’s a mix of Shimano and SRAM drivetrain components, Avid BB5s and an attractive leather touring saddle from Gyes all riding atop a set of Kenda 2.1-inch Small Block Eight tires. Those tires would need to be swapped out for 45 mm tires if fenders are installed though. Overall a pretty respectable build for a moderately priced rig.


My first ride on the Slot included as many surfaces as I could find and the bike performed well. I have always been impressed with how well the Small Block Eight tires handled a wide range of terrains. Once again, they didn’t disappoint. The tread pattern works well on gravel and smoother surface roads , but also hold up decently on dirt… as long as it’s not too wet.


I’m looking forward to throwing some weight on the bike and taking it out on some longer mixed surface excursions. Watch out for a full write up in Bicycle Times Issue #37 and find out how well one bike can do it all. It will be hitting subscribers’ mailboxes and digital devices around September 10th and showing up on the newsstands a few weeks later.

Vital stats

  • Price: $1,399
  • Weight: 29.78 lbs.
  • Sizes: S, M, L (tested), XL
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