Review: Marin Four Corners

Marin Four Corners-2

Tester: Emily Walley
Price: $1,100
Weight: 26.9 pounds
Sizes: S (tested), M, L, XL

This year is Marin Bikes’ 30th anniversary, and it marks the introduction of an all-new “utilitour” model, the Four Corners. The neutral gray steel frame gives the bike a timeless look, while disc brakes, wide tire clearance and an upright riding position keep pace with cyclists’ expectations for adventure touring and bikepacking.

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What piqued my interest in this bike was its Gemini, do-it-all attitude packaged at an approachable price point. The Four Corners is equipped with a Shimano Sora 50/39/30 crank and 12-36 cassette, wide Schwalbe Silento 700×40 tires and the stopping power of Promax Render 160 mm disc brakes. The bike’s tour-ready spec is rounded out with mounts for racks front and rear, fenders and three water bottles.

Marin also offers the upgraded Four Corners Elite model with a SRAM 1×11 drivetrain and hydraulic disc brakes for $2,300.

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The Four Corners was designed with a long top tube—21.8 inches on the small—but also a long stem offering ample room for adjustment. An upright riding position is facilitated by a tall head tube, and the Marin bars have a 20-degree flare to the drop, which allows for a natural hand position that opens up your core. This had me in the drops more than usual, and I’ll struggle to return to a bar without flare.

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On a weekend tour I split my gear between a front rack, frame pack and seat bag. It can be a struggle to fit standard-sized frame packs on small-sized frames, but the long top tube opens up the interior space, expanding storage options for shorter folks. The tires are a good middle-of-the-road rubber, offering adequate rolling speed on hard roads and off-road traction. Best of all they’re stout, making them a good fit in any terrain where you’re susceptible to punctures.

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While the stock tires were capable on smooth sections of singletrack and confident when loaded down with touring gear, there’s ample clearance for swapping to larger tires: up to 700×45 with fenders or 29×2.1 without.

The bike remained poised across varying terrain, its balance un-phased by rutted dirt roads and chunky railroad ballast, proving competent to carry the weight for an extended tour. I found the gear range to be ample for touring Pennsylvania’s rolling hills, but an easier gear may be advantageous on an extended tour with sustained climbs.

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For days between 45 and 85 miles, the WTB Volt Sport saddle was comfortable and supportive, even on long sections of rail trail. “The Four Corners was designed for the rider who is looking for a versatile, modern take on a touring bike,” said Chris Holmes, brand director for Marin Bikes. “[It’s] one that is equally at home with a weekday commute as it is on a week-long adventure.”

For the city dweller, it fills the niche for everyday commuting needs, and for the adventure seeker, the large tire clearance and touring capability encourages exploring on gravel and dirt. As cyclists, what tales would we have to share if everything went as planned? The Marin Four Corners is ready for a change of route and a story to tell.



First Impression: Kona Wheelhouse and Sutra LTD

Kona is pretty well known as a mountain bike brand, but it also has plenty of road-going products with finger-in-your-eye mountain bike attitude. While many companies start with road racing bikes and then branch out into adventure, travel and commuting, Kona focuses solely on the kind of bikes you’d expect to see in Bicycle Times.

Each year Kona hosts its dealers and some of us media slime for an event called the Kona Ride. It’s a chance to get hands-on with the new models and hobnob with the Kona employees. Nearly the entire company joins in and it’s fun to match some faces with the bikes named after them. Traditionally held at the brand’s US office in Bellingham, Washington, this year they invaded our neighbors to the north and hosted it in Squamish, British Columbia.

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If you’ve heard of it but you’re not familiar, Squamish is sort of halfway between Vancouver and Whistler, the mountain bike/ski mecca and host of the 2000 Winter Olympics. Squamish used to be the place where you stopped for gas and a pee on your way north, but in the last few years the city has seen a huge surge in popularity thanks to dual booms of interest and investment in outdoor recreation, namely cycling, rock climbing and whitewater.

I was fortunate enough to have a few days to explore town and sample Kona’s latest bikes. A friend and I grabbed two from the demo fleet and set out to get lost.

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First up is the Wheelhouse. A new model for 2017, it starts with the same Reynolds 853 steel frame as the Roadhouse model introduced last year but does away with some of the frills to hit a lower price point, in this case $1,600. Built with a 10-speed Shimano Tiagra drivetrain and a wide gear range, it’s the perfect do-it-all road bike.

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Disc brakes and 30 mm Schwalbe tires give it great stopping power and a smooth ride, especially when combined with quality steel. Kona says it will fit a 28 mm tire with fenders and maybe a 32 mm without, which is exactly what we like to see in a road bike. And a threaded bottom bracket! Rejoice! 

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The Roadhouse model ($3,799) remains for 2017 and gets an even higher end spec: Shimano Ultegra 11-speed with hydraulic brakes, Mavic wheels and a very cool frame that has been welded AND brazed, then clear coated.


Halfway through our ride we stopped at Fergie’s, a Squamish institution if there ever was one. It’s an indoor and outdoor cafe open for breakfast and lunch. The property also boasts 12 riverside cabins and a whitewater guiding service, so you’ll have plenty to do before and after you fuel up with some amazing Eggs Benny.

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After lunch my friend and I traded bikes and I hopped aboard the new Sutra LTD ($2,000). Introduced last year, it gets an update for 2017 in the form of even more tire clearance. Officially it will fit a 29×2.1 tire, but you might even fit a little more.

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It ships with the new 45 mm WTB Riddler gravel/adventure tires that can be painlessly converted to tubeless with the WTB Frequency Team i23 rims. Despite the quick release axles at both ends, these are straight-up mountain bike wheels and can handle whatever punishment you want to throw at them.

Compared to the Wheelhouse, the Sutra LTD feels like a much bigger bike. It has a less aggressive position and the flared handlebars are nice and wide. It’s not too burly for road use though, as the tires don’t have that annoying vibration that many treaded tires have on pavement. While we only got to explore some gravel alleys, Kona approves of, no actually encourages, you getting it dirty on some singletrack.

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The steel frame has mounts for up to five bottle cages so stay thirsty, my friends. It’s built with a SRAM Rival 1×11 drivetrain and hydraulic disc brakes. It’s also available as a frame and fork for $550.


While the Sutra LTD takes care of the bikepacking and gravel market its sibling, the Sutra model ($1,400), gets the more traditional road touring treatment with a 3×9 drivetrain, bar end shifters, rear rack, fenders, Brooks saddle and some beautiful, sparkly root beer paint.

Other highlights

We didn’t get to sample any of these new bikes, but there’s a lot to like about the 2017 lineup. You can also read my ride impressions of the Big Honzo DL in our sister magazine, Dirt Rag.


Jake the Snake: The Jake line of cyclocross bikes gets a few tweaks, and the cantilever brakes are gone for good. The cyclocross/gravel crossover Private Jake model would be my choice.


Esatto: A disc brake road bike for adventure seekers, not skinny pants racers. It’s available in aluminum, carbon and Ti.


Rove: Perfect for commuting, light touring or all around adventures that don’t require tires as big as the Sutra LTD. The Rove is available in aluminum, steel and Ti versions. Read my review of the Rove here.


Unit: Historically a steel, singlespeed 29er, the Unit goes 27plus for 2017, though it keeps the traditional 100/135 mm quick release sliding dropouts. It also gets a whole host of braze-ons so you can build it up for any kind of adventure. It’s also available as a frameset for $525.


Ute: Kona still makes the Ute.



Specialized launches new Adventure Gear line

Specialized is going full steam into the adventure realm with a full line of accessories for bikepacking or bike touring or commuting or whatever it is you want to do with them. Under the umbrella of Specialized Adventure Gear, the lineup includes bikes like the Sequoia, AWOL, Diverge and Fatboy, along with a ton of accessories and apparel.

Read about the new Specialized Sequoia that was unveiled along with this bag line.


Here we’re going to focus on the Burra Burra bag collection. Like many other Specialized products, the Burra Burra line is named for a location in Henry Coe State Park just outside of the brand’s offices in Morgan Hill, California.


The name is a bit clunky, but the Handlebar Stabilizer Harness ($90) should keep your gear stowed tight with an aluminum support that bolts to the handlebars and a simple, wrap around shape that can hold a dry bag or other gear.

It can hold your own dry bag, or Specialized will sell separately two sizes of their own, a 13 liter ($40) and a 23 liter ($45), both of which have double-sided entry and full waterproof 100D Cordura construction.

The Framepacks ($90-$110) are one of the most useful trends in recent years, as a great way to keep snacks and more close at hand. The coated nylon body is super water repellent, so anything short of throwing it into a lake should result in dry cargo. They even have water-resistant YKK zippers. A combination of thick, urethane straps and camlocks or traditional Velcro keep them secured in place. Specialized will offer three sizes to fit nearly any bike, though it’s worth pointing out that they often interfere with water bottles. The bottle cages are still usable, but a side-entry cage will make getting the bottles in and out a lot easier.


Fans of the awesome Specialized Pizza Rack will be pleased to see a new Pizza Bag ($100) designed specifically for that big front rack. It has a padded, roll-top body that is sure to keep the contents dry, or can be filled with ice and used as a rolling cooler. Trust us, we tested it. There are a few exterior pockets that keep essential items handy while you’re rolling and it measures 33 x 24 x 13 cm.

At first glance, the Stabilizing Seatpack looks like a lot of other roll-closed seat bags on the market, but Specialized has added a small, aluminum stabilizer bar that bolts to the seatpost to prevent it from swaying or drooping. Unlike some other designs on the market that use a support rail, this version only extends halfway along the bag’s length. The bag itself is made from the same watertight material so it will keep your gear dry, and is available in a 10 liter size ($130) and a 20 liter size ($140).


Bottle cages eyelets have been popping up in all sorts of new places in the last few years, and the Sequoia has a pair on each side of its carbon fork, so Specialized created these Burra Burra Stuffcages ($30). Made from aluminum, they are smaller than the ones you see from others, and only bolt to two eyelets instead of three. The aluminum body comes with two straps for water bottles, fuel canisters or whatever else you want to bring. Specialized also introduced a Stuffpack ($40) that is sold separately that holds one liter of cargo in its roll-top body. It also has its own Velcro straps attached that can keep it secure in the cage.

Finally, the handiest of all, the Top Tube Pack ($50) is perfect for your phone, keys or other essentials that you want to keep close at hand. It can be mounted at the stem or the seatpost and uses a single front-to-back zipper to access the 0.75 liter cargo area. The external pockets are good for a multi-tool or snack wrappers. It’s made of the same weather-resistant material as all the bags.




Specialized revives Sequoia name for adventure road bike

The first Sequoia bikes were designed by Tim Neenan as a road bike with an adventure attitude. The second generation, designed by Jim Merz, evolved into a full-blown touring rig to take you around the world. The name appeared on a series of, let’s say, “less-than-exciting” hybrids and city bikes through the years, but has made a grand return with this new 2017 touring model, hitting dealers in mid-August.

Specialized flew a collection of media slime like myself out to beautiful Western North Carolina to sample the bikes and get the story from both the Adventure Team that inspired them and the engineers that created them.


The new Sequoia is Specialized’s take on a modern adventure touring bike. That can mean a lot of different things to a lot of different people, but there’s no denying the proliferation of rackless bags has brought a new generation into the fold of bicycle travelers. And while racks and panniers can take you across the country, many riders are just looking for a way to get the essentials out for a weekend.


While the existing Specialized AWOL model (steel touring bike) dips its toes into the off-road realm, the Sequoia is more road-oriented and slots squarely between the AWOL and the Diverge in the Specialized lineup. You could keep it lean and jump into a paceline or load it up with racks, fenders and cargo and hit the trail.

The new 700x42c Sawtooth tires roll exceptionally well on the road and their stout, tubeless casing held up on singletrack. Specialized says the Sequoia it will fit up to a 700×45 tire (that’s officially but you can probably squeeze more in there), and it will fit the 650×47 version of the wheels and tires that are coming soon. More on that in a moment.


The frame is a selection of custom-drawn chromoly steel tubes, and each one is specifically shaped and butted for each frame size to ensure a consistent ride quality across the five sizes. No two sizes share any frame tubes. The geometry is comfortable, with a low bottom bracket and more upright fit, but not so relaxed that you can’t put the hammer down when you want to. Details on the frame include a threaded bottom bracket, 142×12 thru axle, flat mount brake caliper mounts and a third bottle cage mount under the downtube.

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To go with the new frame is an all-new carbon fiber fork. Not just a repurposed cyclocross fork, the new unit was designed specifically for this bike with a 12 mm thru axle and bottle cage eyelets on the legs that can hold 5 pounds each. It too has the new flat-mount caliper mounts, and even a hole to run a dynamo hub wire inside the right right leg. Specialized offers an AWOL model with a dynamo hub, so don’t be surprised to see a special edition version of the Sequoia with one down the road.


Not content to grab parts off the Specialized shelves, the design team also went about designing a new wheelset. The Cruzero wheels are tubeless compatible and offer a stout 25 mm rim width. The hubs were designed specifically for this application as well and roll on sealed bearings for the Cruzero wheels and standard bearings for the less expensive Hayfield variation. The wheelsets will be available on their own in the near future, Specialized says, in both 700c and 650b.

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To wrap around those wheels Specialized has released an all-new tire in the Sawtooth. With versions in 700×42 and 650bx47, with either black or tan sidewalls, it was the standout performer of our time on the bikes. Designed from the ground-up, it uses Specialized’s latest rubber compounds and tubeless technology, with an all-purpose tread design that held its own on the rocks and roots of Pisgah singletrack. They roll well enough to paceline at 25 mph and cornered well on the gravel and dirt. Our group of about 20 riders put nearly 2,000 miles of abuse into these tires over three days and we suffered only one flat. The Sawtooth tires will come stock on the Sequoia and will be available separately for $40.


While many riders appreciate a more upright riding position, the downside is that often your steerer has a giant stack of spacers or you have a goofy upright stem. Specialized is trying to distribute that stack height with its new riser drop bars, the Hover. It has a small amount of rise built in along the center, allowing you to keep that stem flipped down or just offering a little more height. They also have a bit of flare to the drops too. The downside is that you have less room to mount accessories on the center portion of the bars, and the aesthetics are … unique. Riser drop bars. What will they think of next?


To go with the bars is a new line of canvas and leather handlebar tape and saddles that look great with the understated graphics on the Sequoia. The CG-R seatpost is probably a love-it-or-hate-it component, though.

Sequoia models


Sequoia Expert

  • $3,500
  • SRAM Rival 1×11
  • Cruzero wheels


Sequoia Elite

  • $2,000
  • Shimano 105 2×11
  • Hayfield wheels



  • $1,300
  • Shimano Sora 2×9
  • Hayfield wheels
  • Steel fork

Sequoia Expert frameset (not pictured)

  • $1,200
  • The frameset version of the Sequoia will be unique, with a stainless steel downtube and chainstays, plus a white to black vertical fade paint job.


A few folks have asked me how this model fits into the current Specialized lineup and what kind of rider it is for. The new Sequoia might not be revolutionary, but it’s a great option for folks looking for a steel version of the current crop of big-tire road bikes. While it’s obviously not as sporty as the carbon or aluminum Diverge, it’s still more go-fast bike than an AWOL or even bikes like the Kona Sutra or Niner RLT steel. I don’t have an official weight number but I’d guess it’s around 20 to 21 pounds. The bike that it reminds me of the most is the Specialized Tricross, but obviously reimagined for a more discerning performance-oriented customer.

More photos

Photos by Beth Welliver – Specialized

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Coming up next

You might see quite a few new accessories in these photos. More on those in the next post…



Rapha and Apidura launch pack collaboration

When you think Rapha, you probably think of ultra-high-end apparel or Team Sky at the Tour de France. Now, the company has teamed up with fellow Britons at Apidura to offer its first line of packs for long-distance cycling.


The Handlebar Pack ($130) and Saddle Pack ($160) are built by Apidura with Rapha‘s classic accents. Whether you’re on a race bike or a touring rig, now you can load up some extra clothes, a hearty amount of snacks or whatever else you want to bring to the beach or on your next brevet—and do it with that classic Rapha style.


The packs are made from a water-resistant synthetic body with reflective strips and accents. A separate dry bag that can store inside the packs is also included. Each attaches to the bike in three points with rubberized reinforcements.


What do you think? These are priced competitively with other manufacturers’ bikepacking equipment. Would you choose the Rapha/Apidura collaboration over the competition? Let us know in the comments below.

Location photos by George Marshall/Rapha



Review: Blackburn Outpost seat bag and handlebar roll

As you’ve likely noticed from reading this magazine and elsewhere, bikepacking and rackless touring has reenergized the bike touring market. What began as a niche sport supported by products from a few boutique brands has now hit the mainstream and the major players are getting involved.

No stranger to bike touring, Blackburn is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, having been dedicated to open road adventures since day one. The Outpost seat bag and handlebar roll are its foray into the lightweight touring scene and offer classic features with some unique twists. The seat pack ($120) attaches to your saddle rails and seatpost and consists of two pieces: an outer sling and a removable, roll-top stuff sack.


Rated at 10.5 liters it is more than enough to swallow a sleeping bag and a small tent, and the extra lash points on the back let you strap even more on. The buckles have locking adjusters, which makes it really handy to overstuff as well, as you can tuck in a jacket or other loose items and keep them secure. The included dry bag is a separate piece that you can pull out and take in your tent with you. The sling works best if the dry bag is filled at least half way to fill it out and prevent it from sagging.

In use, the Seat Pack offers a ton of storage capacity, but it does wag a bit from side to side. It’s largely out-of-sight-out-of-mind, though, and I’m willing to put up with it. I had no complaints about the build quality but, compared to the boutique seat packs on the market, the material used is thicker and heavier.


The Handlebar roll ($100) uses a similar modular layout consisting of a harness that holds a dry bag. This bag is open on both ends so you don’t have to unpack the whole thing if your jacket is at the one end. It also make it easier to pack. Inside the sling harness is a Velcro patch to keep the dry bag in place. The harness attaches to the handlebars with a quick release mechanism so it protrudes a good bit out and doesn’t interfere with shifters or brakes.


The extra lash points here are also handy for overflow storage and the red security strap keeps the whole setup from rotating downward on your handlebars should you hit a big bump. I appreciated the Handlebar Roll’s equally large storage capacity but feel the plastic quick release system is largely superfluous. Because it is so easy to unbuckle the stuff sack, I don’t see the need for a second means of removing it. I would trade that convenience for a simpler, lighter design.


Worth noting is proper installation to make it function well. The bracket has been updated for fall 2016 with a wire safety support instead of the plastic one on the first version (pictured here). The red strap is also important as a secondary method of keeping the whole setup from rotating down into your front tire (see the green arrow above).

The Blackburn bags offer a good compromise of cost and features if you don’t need the lightest handmade gear. The Seat Pack especially is a good way to haul a lot of stuff without adding a rear rack.



Blackburn Rangers take to the road

It was imperative that we stay vigilant against the danger. Our enemy would not discriminate. Young or old, strong or feeble, all were within its sights. It could sink its vicious teeth into our flesh and not release for days or weeks. Few would escape our journey without falling victim to its ruthless aggression.

Our expedition leader and Blackburn’s brand manager, Robin, tried in vain to prepare us for the threat. He gathered us up and spoke in hushed tones.

“It’s important to remember that if you’re not on the trail, you are almost certainly standing in poison oak.”


It was a valiant warning, especially since I’m still scratching two weeks later. I joined Blackburn and its 2016 class of Blackburn Rangers for an introductory ride through the mountains of coastal California. With a little help from Santa Cruz and Big Agnes we escaped from the arid asphalt plains of the San Jose airport parking lot and ascending through sun, wind, mist and fog to a quiet Boy Scout camp perched high in the hills above the city. Tucked beneath the massive evergreens we cooled our heels and warmed our hearts with a campfire and some of Kentucky’s finest.


Blackburn is the kind of brand that doesn’t just spit out products to make a buck. They’re out there using these things—both the employees and the brand’s annual group of Blackburn Rangers. The six Rangers chosen for 2016 will complete some of the most famous bike touring routes in North America. While off-road bikepacking is very on-trend right now, it’s really bike travel of all kinds that Blackburn is promoting, as many of the routes its Rangers travel are entirely paved.

Meet the Rangers


Brian Ohlen – Cody, Wyoming

Brian hails is an avid fisherman and cyclist.  He intends to combine his passions and bike-fish his way from Canada to Mexico, in search of the elusive Steelhead Trout.

What is your goal for the route?

“I’d love to catch a steelhead in each of the three states I’ll travel through. Three fish doesn’t sound like much, but those buggers are hard to catch!”

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Sorry Laura, this is the only photo of you I took.

Katie Hawkins and Laura Brigham – East Palo Alto, California

Katie, left, and Laura, right, are neighbors in East Palo Alto and decided to apply together to tackle the Great Divide this summer.

What do you hope to get out of this journey?

Laura: “I hope to share the enthusiasm that I have for biking and the outdoors with those on the Great Divide as well as those following from home. I hope at the end of this crazy ‘Canadian gone Mexican’ adventure, Katie and I will leave with unforgettable memories, strong legs, sweet tan lines, and a bunch of awesome new friends.”

Katie: “I see this as a soul-searching adventure for 2 months. I want to be able to get away from my normal 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. job and be on an adventure that separates me from life’s distractions. I want to share my experiences with various biking communities along the route and hope to learn from them, as well.”


Courtney Lewis – Brooklyn, New York

Courtney followed the Blackburn Ranger program for the last few years, and the variety of their backgrounds and approaches were immediate inspiration for her to tackle the same path in her own way. Courtney’s ‘own way’ includes stepping off the bike and hiking nearby summits along the route, and also bringing her dog along.

What do you hope to get out of this journey?

“I’m excited to shake up my routine, and the routines of my friends (and friends-to-be!) along the way. I want to push my limits to get the most out of the time I have, and to learn more about myself.”


Ivan Kilroe – Lancaster, Great Britain

Ivan has a great approach to cycling that is based on sharing beauty and joy with friends that we can appreciate.

Have you traveled by bike in the past?

“In the last year I’ve done a handful of short trips travelling by bicycle and really enjoyed the freedom you feel from carrying everything you need to survive. I’ve definitely got a bad case of ‘outdoorism’ – seeing the sun rise and set everyday, and waking up outside all becomes kind of addictive.”


Photo by John Watson

Christian Ayoob – Watkinsville, Georgia

Christian hails from the robust , but often overlooked, cycling community around Athens, Georgia, and is one of the first Southerners that has been selected as a Ranger.

What do you hope to get out of this journey?

“By the end of this journey, I hope to have collected stories, met as many people as possible, and all around have had fun. Along with doing this, I would love to have a very detailed journal and blog for others to follow and get inspired.”

While the Rangers plan to ride thousands of miles, you don’t need to quit your job and drop off the grid to have a great adventure on a bike. Most of Blackburn’s products are just as useful on a commute to school as they are on the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route.

New gear

We also got a look at some of Blackburn’s newest products on the ride:

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Blackburn’s unique frame bags ($60 or $65) come in two sizes and are expandable depending on your cargo needs. They’ve been updated with stronger zippers and will soon be available in a limited-edition camo print. The Seat Pack ($120) and Handlebar Roll ($100) will be available in camo as well. All the bags will continue to be available in black.


These little 2Fer lights were one of my favorites. These $25 USB-rechargeable lights have a clip on the back that holds them snug on a loop like you find on backpacks, or on the included stretchy strap. The name derives from their ability to run with white or red LEDs so they can go front or back.



The new Switch Mini multi-tool is a bit of a crossover between something that stays packed away with your bike stuff and your at-home tool kit. There are four pieces with a tool at each end that can be held either perpendicular or inline with the handle. The rounded ends make it useful when working in tight spaces where you can’t hold the tool perfectly inline with the bolt. It includes a 2.5 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, 6 mm, T25 Torx, T30 Torx and a flat head screwdriver that all pack away in the included case, with room to spare for an ID and a couple bucks.


My favorite item introduced was the new Chamber HV floor pump ($80), the highlight of a whole new line of floor pumps. Designed for big tires, it has a high volume piston and a HUGE gauge that only goes to 50 psi. Some trick features include a bleed valve in the head for precise pressures, a bottle opener (natch) and a 31.8 mm clamp for the handle that lets you bolt on an old set of handlebars for some custom flair.

More photos


Video: The Zenga Bros. Tall Bike Tour

The Zenga brothers are six young men who were instilled with the passion for free expression at a young age. Their community art projects and installations eschew the bounds of traditional art and become part of a lifestyle and a culture. Plus they build some kickass tall bikes.

Premiering at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival, “Tall Bike Tour: Part 1 – Visions and Dreams,” introduces Zenga Bros upcoming documentary in which they bring their eccentric brand of creativity to the streets while traveling and living on tall bikes.


Video: Specialized Adventure Dispatch x Sarah and Tom Swallow


Courtesy of Specialized

In this episode of The Adventure Dispatch, we head out on an overnight ride with Sarah Swallow through the Humboldt Redwood State Park. Sarah is an expert when it comes to creative route planning, which is why we’re happy that she decided to share her methodology for sub-24-hour overnight riding (S24O). So take notes or just enjoy the scenery and get motivated, because you’re about to learn what happens when you saddle-up, slow down, and take notice of the world around you.

Read more about the Swallow’s pioneering ride along the Trans American Trail.


Globetrotting: Finding your groove

By Beth Puliti

Whether you’re headed out on a world tour or a weekend adventure, I have four words for you: be open to change.

Until you begin the physical act of pedaling your bicycle, any grand plans that you have made in your head are subject to change at any time for any reason. This is especially true when it comes to how far you expect to travel on a daily basis.

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Before embarking on this open-ended bike tour, I planned my route based on how far I anticipated pedaling each day and how often I thought I should take a rest day. With these averages, I was able to loosely figure out where on the map I’d be at certain points in the year. Advantageous, sure, but not entirely accurate.

When I hit the pavement, myriad factors came into play each and every day that influenced and sometimes even changed my best-laid plans. Factors that hadn’t crossed my mind while sitting in front of the wood stove pouring over maps and journals of those who had gone before my husband and I. These factors became immediately apparent once on the road.

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Factors like long stretches of rain in northern Italy and unending sections of flat highway in the central part of the country. Both had us hammering out way more miles than we had anticipated simply because the scenery around us either wasn’t interesting (or didn’t look so through the rain), and so we just kept plugging along without taking the time to stop. We arrived in Rome far earlier than planned, which allowed us to build in a visit with my relatives, something that wasn’t in our original plans, but turned out to be a personal highlight of the tour.

On the other hand, mechanicals, Mother Nature and ill-marked roads have slowed our pedaling too many times to count. In Thailand, a handful of flat tires sidelined us for much of the afternoon. In Turkey, a brutal headwind encountered during the first few days of entering the country nearly brought our progress to a stop. And in Italy, a wrong turn got us lost on unmarked roads in a national forest for hours. In all of these cases, we covered far shorter ground than expected that day.

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Being open to change allows you to take wrong turns, broken bike parts and bad weather in stride so you can focus on things other than your daily mileage count—like the friendly people you’re probably meeting, the incredible food you’re probably eating and the new places you’re probably seeing. These are the reasons you decided to travel by bike anyway, right?

OK, so you’re not going to wreck yourself over a silly little thing like daily distances. What about other preconceived plans you made? Perhaps you decided you would exclusively camp on your tour, but after a few nights in a tent you realize you don’t really like it. Fellow bike tourers, it’s OK to change the plan to what you feel comfortable doing.

Globetrotting BT35-3

Time on the road makes you realize that many of the best experiences will occur on the days when things don’t go entirely as expected. More miles, fewer miles, sleeping under the stars or under a roof—at the end of the day, it doesn’t matter. What matters is finding a groove that works for you. One that’s not too fast, nor too slow to enjoy the world from behind your handlebars.

Follow Beth Puliti on Instagram and read her other thoughts on bike touring for Bicycle Times.



Review: Becker Gear frame bag

When you call up Becker Gear to order a framebag, you know exactly what you’re going to get. That’s because founder Tupper Becker does all the order processing, designing, cutting, sewing and customer service.

“I look at it as more of a relationship,” Becker said. It’s the kind of one-on-one service that you’re only going to get with a one-man shop. “I really like to have a sense of who they are, and they can have sense of who I am.

Based in Fairbanks, Alaska, Becker now splits his time making cycling bags and gear for dog sled mushers. “All the bags we build are designed with Alaska in mind,” he said, and touts their cold weather abilities. The rubberized bits are good to 70 below zero, he said, and the fabric has been tested in Antarctica to 131 below.


All Becker Gear framebag designs start as one of five standard models with various degrees of complexity and pockets. While this example has a few extra features, Becker says most of his products are basic by design.

“We want to be the Carhart jeans of frame bags,” he said. “It’s designed to be fixed if it fails; it’s not a throwaway piece… We want to keep it simple and functional and working.”


The model I tested is the White Mountains Plus, which retails for $199. It has a large main compartment with a zipper on the drive side, a half-depth pocket with a zipper on the opposite side, and a small pocket secured with only a strap on the bottom of the drive side. The main pocket can also be divided into an upper and lower section with an interior piece of Velcro, although there is no access to the lower portion from the outside. While that might sound odd, it does make sense if you want to stash items in the bottom that you seldom need, like emergency tubes and tools, then close off the divider to keep handy more frequently needed items, like snacks or gloves.


The VX33 fabric, woven originally for sailcloth, is thin and stiff. While the material is waterproof, the bag doesn’t have any extra waterproofing features, because in most cases water resistant is good enough, and if true waterproofness is needed, it would result in a much heavier and complicated bag.


Right now all Becker framebags are made-to-order specifically for each customer. Becker said he does plan to offer stock sizes in the near future, as well as some other gear when the new Becker Gear website launches. He also offers some other interesting bags such as a massive top tube bag and a bag that hangs under the down tube making the most of some unused space.

Becker built this frame bag for my Salsa Mukluk and when we started the process, I used a large piece of cardboard to map out exactly where the bottle eyelets, front derailleur, and other accessories were located so none of the straps would interfere. As a result it fits perfectly and allows me to continue to use the bottle cage bolts below the down tube, attach a top tube feed bag, etc.


I frequently use the main compartment to carry a 3 liter water bladder, with the house routed up through a slit at the top of the bag. There is also a slit at the top rear, though Becker said no one uses it (including myself) so he’s going to discontinue it. Inside along the thin, frame-facing panels you’ll also find straps to hang a hydration bladder, strap in a pump or mount whatever other goodies you’d like to keep handy.


The zippers are massive YKK units that look like they’ll hold up to some abuse. As the weakest part of the bag they are usually the first thing to fail but so far so good. Unlike some other designs, the front of the bag doesn’t swell out wider and occasionally I so overstuffed the thing that I couldn’t close the zipper, but I likely just need to bring less crap.


I’ve also used it on a few other bikes and it has fit extremely well even on bikes that it wasn’t designed for.

When you buy a Becker Gear bag, you’re becoming part of a community. Like it says right on the website, “You won’t be able to buy a thing here without talking to someone.” It means you’re going to get exactly what you want and there’s almost no chance of misunderstandings. All at a competitive price.

“There are a lot of advantages to being small,” Becker said.



An earlier version of this story listed an incorrect location for Becker Gear. It is based in Fairbanks.


Swallow Bicycle Works joins forces with Bruce Gordon

After finishing their traverse of the U.S. along the Trans-America Trail, possibly the first to do so by bicycle, Sarah and Tom Swallow were looking for their next adventure. They had closed up their bike shop, Swallow Bicycle Works in Loveland, Ohio, before they left.

The completed their ride across the country on Bruce Gordon’s Rock N Road tires (see our review in Issue #38) and, after visiting Gordon in his Petaluma, California, shop, they decided to stay. The Swallows will join Gordon running his bike shop doing repairs, manning the phones and sharing their knowledge of adventure touring with the world.


Gordon knows a thing or three about that market, too. His Rock N Road touring bike—in both custom and production versions—has been at the forefront of big-tire, gravel road riding for decades. The flat-bar version is even credited with helping to create the market for 29-inch wheel mountain bikes.

Their target start date at the shop is February 1, 2016.


Swift Industries’ Stoked Spoke adventure lecture series is back

There’s no denying it’s a bit harder to find adventure in the winter. The mountains are snowed in, the skies are gray and the ground is wet. But in Seattle you can keep your bike camping stoke high with the return of the Swift Industries Stoked Spoke series.

“A few summers back we were rolling out on bicycle adventures and hardly even unpacking between trips,” said Swift Industries founder Martina Brimmer. “We spent weeknights at the bar after work scouring maps and exchanging stories from our weekends away and getting details about where other friends had gone exploring. It hit us that a route sharing series would be exactly the ticket to keep us excited through the dark winter months. We took a lot of inspiration from the TED Talks format and added booze, a lot of flannel and steel bikes to the equation.”


Held on three evenings over the winter, each forum will include four to six presentations of maps, photos, routes and more that can inspire your next excursion. After the 5 to 10 minute talks, each presenter will host an information table where they can chat one on one with anyone who wants to learn more.

Stoked Spoke series

  • December 16
  • January 20
  • February 17

The series is meant to highlight the best bike adventures of Cascadia and beyond, and each night will be hosted by the Rhino Room with a setup for screenings, tables for maps and booths, plus a full bar to keep the spirits high.

Jason Goods leads a bikepacking presentation at the Bicycle Times Adventure Fest.

Jason Goodman leads a bikepacking presentation at the Bicycle Times Adventure Fest.

“Each presentation will include maps of the route, the level of challenge of the route measured in elevation gain and terrain, and offers tips on ideal gear and bicycle setups,” Brimmer said. “There has been an increase in interest to get off pavement and onto dirt in the touring scene… This new chapter in bicycle adventuring is introducing people to backcountry travel which tends to be more logistically heavy than highway touring so the more remote the destination is, the more information like resupply spots and water access become the highlight of a presentation. We encourage all sorts of terrain and travel styles, but as usual, our emphasis is on tours that are self-supported and mostly planned around camping.”


The Swift Industries Get Lost Adventure Club.

At the core of the Stoked Spokes events is getting people together in a room and promoting interaction in a way that simply can’t be duplicated online, Brimmer said.

“Reading about a trip often kick-starts my curiosity about a region or route, but if I know someone who has ridden those roads I always go right to them for tips, beta, and the opportunity to ask more specific questions, like access to fly fishing en route. Getting together as a growing community of bicycle-obsessed wanderers and explorers is so fun and really motivating. Our circle of riding companions grows with each event.”

If you have a route you’d like to share, get in touch with Jason at Swift Industries ([email protected]) and include the following in the body of the email:

  • Name and email address
  • A paragraph describing your route overview, ready to be published on the Swift Industries blog
  • Name and location of starting and finish points
  • Total mileage
  • Duration of your trip
  • Link to a digital map (RideWithGPS or Google)
  • Four photos from your ride

If your route is chosen you should be prepared to put together a Powerpoint presentation and some maps and photos to help other folks find their way.


Can’t make it in person? Watch the Swift Industries blog for a recap of each Stoked Spoke events, complete with trip summaries, maps and photos. Or you can host a Stoked Spoke event of your own. Bike shops, breweries and living rooms are all great places to host a Stoked Spoke event, Brimmer said. When choosing a location make sure you consider the line of sight to the presenters and the acoustics of the space, she said, and if you have other questions don’t hesitate to get in touch.

Swift Industries’ tips for a kick-ass trip report:

  • Short and sweet is the ticket to a great presentation.
  • Dynamic photos keep the audience engaged and will really capture the audience’s imagination.
  • Practice makes perfect: the art of storytelling is weaving suspense and humor into your trip’s logistical overview.
  • Have lots of fun!



Swift Industries launches new Hinterland Collection

The hinterlands are the area just beyond your reach. Past the horizon. Around the next bend.


Those are the places Swift Industries hopes you’ll explore with its new line of bags and accessories. All of Swift Industries’ bags are made by hand in its Seattle workshop, and the new Hinterland Collection switches out the traditional Cordura construction in favor of the lighter and more water-resistant XPac material.

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The centerpiece is the updated Ozette randonneuring bag that is available in three sizes, each of which mounts to a rando-style front rack. They feature a flared flap for water protection, a new closure system that offers better durability and versatility, and an internal organization system to keep your items close at hand. The small carries 10.5 liters, the medium 12.5 liters and the large 15.5 liters. It is only available in black XPac with orange accents. Prices range from $230 to $260.


Matching the Ozette is a pair of Hinterland Jr. Ranger Panniers, also made from XPac and perfect for carrying on front lowrider racks. They carry 20 liters per pair and use a traditional bungee hook attachment system for universal fit and durability. In addition to the external pockets, the dual-closure main body is lined with waterproof textile to ensure it is extremely weather resistant. They retail for $260 a pair.


Also new is the Roanoke Backpack Pannier, a modular backpack that attaches to your bike via traditional hook-and-strap pannier hardware. The two adjustable straps are made from seatbelt webbing for comfort and clip on and off to stow in the front pocket. Still made from Cordura for a classic look, it is available in either a Mini or Roll Top version, and the backpack conversion can be added to custom pannier bags, as well. The Roll Top measures 23 liters and the Mini Roll Top is 15 liters. The Roll Top sells for $205 and the Mini Roll Top for $180.

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The Hinterland Collection, the Roanoke backpack panniers and all of Swift Industries’ classic bags are available now at Swift Industries’ redesigned website.

Keep reading

Read our review of the classic Jr. Ranger Panniers.


Swallow Bicycle Works completes the Trans America Trail

In early August, Sarah and Tom Swallow closed up their bike shop, Swallow Bicycle Works in Loveland, Ohio, and set out for the adventure of a lifetime. They hoped to be one of the first to complete the Trans America Trail, a cross-country route from North Carolina to Oregon on mostly gravel, dirt and otherwise unpaved roads. They completed the trip this week after ten weeks on the road. I caught up with Sarah to ask about the experience.


For folks who aren’t familiar, can you tell us a little about the Trans America Trail route?

The Trans America Trail route is a primarily unpaved 5,000-mile transcontinental route designed by Sam Correro, intended for dual sport motorcycles. The surface of the route consists of mostly dirt and gravel roads, some sand, mud, high-clearance rocky roads, and some pavement.


Does the route go through a lot of resupply points? How does it compare to traditional bike touring?

Because the route is designed for dual sport motorcycles, it intersects with small towns that have gas stations. The longest distance between resupply points for us was 150 miles, but most of the time it was 50 to 70 miles. The greater distances between resupply points in less populated areas like Northern Oklahoma, Utah, and Nevada required a lot more planning for food, water, and camping, as we would ride those sections in two to three days, depending on their difficulty. I suppose that traditional bike touring includes more frequent opportunities to resupply and to be in populated areas, but I think it depends on where you are bike touring.


How difficult was it to navigate the route? Did you use GPS? Maps? A little of both? 

We had an easy time following the route using our GPS devices. Although it is not marked, hundreds of motorcyclists ride this route every year, so the route is fairly established with accurate and up-to-date GPX files and maps provided by Sam or GPS Kevin. We used a tablet with downloaded maps, along with local state road maps we would pick up along the way for additional reference. The tablet was also useful for when we had to modify the route files.

What were some of your personal motivations for the trip? 

There have been many. To name a few, it was to see what this route was all about, to see and learn from the world, and the simple pursuit of learning by doing. We wanted to experience it together, and to test our relationship with cycling, something we’ve made a life of with Swallow Bicycle Works.


What kind of gear did you use? What would you recommend gear-wise for someone attempting it themselves?

Choosing a bicycle for this route wasn’t easy since we had no point of reference for what the route would be like other than the small sections we had ridden and the information from motorcyclists on the internet. We used information about the Tour Divide to establish an idea of what the ride could be like with the expectation that there would be more pavement and less climbing. Before this trip we had only done a handful of 3-day and one, 7-day off-road bike tours, so we had relatively little experience relevant to a trip of this proportion.


We opted for what we had the most experience with for long-distance dirt road riding, which were steel-frame touring bicycles with Bruce Gordon 43mm on-/off-road tires and a centralized, lightweight minimal bike packing system. The overall system of equipment we selected was chosen to be an ideal balance of efficiency and comfort for the time that we had to ride the entire route, which we projected to be 500 miles per week for 10 weeks. Our estimates were not too far off, although there was a lot less pavement, a lot more large rocky sections, sand, mud, every kind of gravel there is, and some extremely steep grades.

After riding the route, we realized that our bikes were extremely capable, although biased to groomed road-like conditions, rather than rough rocky trails where we would have been more comfortable on a mountain bike. Our recommendation is to ride what is most comfortable to you on as many surfaces as you can imagine, and don’t ride anything less than a 43mm tire. Also, avoid an overly heavy setup in the case of extreme conditions requiring potential hike-a-bikes (i.e. flooding, mud, sand, snow, rock-slides, and other unknowns that affect a huge route subject to a variety of weather conditions). For a detailed list of what we packed, check out the Swallow Bicycle Works website.


Can you share your favorite high point or maybe not-so-favorite low point for the trip?

The low points made the high points so much higher. One particular low point was riding 40 miles on and off through deep sand in the San Raphael Swell in the high desert of Utah, followed by an unexpectedly steep and technical 20-mile climb the following day. We had hit our limit of difficulty after only 35 miles and decided to call it a day, at which point the perfect camp spot appeared, located along a rushing creek, equipped with a fire ring, plenty of flat spots to lay the tent, and golden aspen trees and cedars all around. That night we drank as much water as we wanted, ate to our hearts’ content, and star gazed into the late hours of the night, until some clouds moved away and revealed the bright orange super moon lunar eclipse, an unexpected surprise.


Keep reading

Read Sarah and Tom’s dispatches from the road on the SBWxTAT blog.



Best bike touring gear for family travel

Editor’s note: Bicycle Times Issue #38 has a family theme, and we reached out to one of the most experienced travelers we know about how he has fared introducing his young son Sage to bicycle touring. In this online extra, Cass Gilbert talks about the gear that his family has found most useful along the way.

By Cass Gilbert

My son Sage is something of a seasoned traveller. At the ripe old age of two and three quarters, he’s already chalked up an impressive tally of countries visited, including the US, the UK, France, Chile and Ecuador. All of which have been enjoyed from the comfort of his bicycle trailer.


As the miles have gone by, our gear choices have evolved. Before Sage was even born, we invested in a Thule Chariot trailer, choosing it thanks to its excellent suspension system, its fabled stoutness, and the broad range of accessories available. Summers are hot in New Mexico, so we invested in the more costly CX1, mainly because it features removable side windows. Otherwise, we’d have opted for the Cougar; it’s cheaper, lighter and simpler, yet uses the same well-regarded suspension system.

For the first few months, we used our Chariot exclusively as a stroller, pairing it with the Infant Sling accessory until Sage was old enough to sit up properly. At 18 months, we added a Yepp seat to our rig—first the Mini that mounts up front, then the Maxi that mounts on a rear rack, as Sage grew taller. We found the former far better for interaction (it’s perfect for pointing out things you see), but the latter better suited to longer, hillier rides, largely because you can pedal out of the saddle.

We’ve also experimented with Thule’s excellent RideAlong; it features a dual beam design that helps smooth out bumpy terrain, as well as useful arm rests and the ability to recline. It is, however, bigger and bulkier, and unfortunately the position of its mounting clamp wasn’t compatible with Nancy’s small sized, derailleured Surly Troll. I often ride a fat or 29+ bike, which really helps add to Sage’s comfort off road, and creates a very stable ride.


But as great as seats are, trailers are still the best option for versatility, be it in the height of summer, the depths of winter, or for the inevitable inclement weather on tour. If your child is still napping, a trailer also provides the perfect cocoon; we’ve also noticed that Sage often enjoys having his own sense of space. For an extended trip, I expect a combination of a seat and trailer would be ideal—it’s the setup of choice for most families I met cycling through South America. As an aside, during our own longer journeys, we play music or audio books through our weather- and child-resistant Outdoor Tech Buckshot speaker to help pass the time.

What else? Given our propensity for seeking out dirt roads, we’ve fitted wider-volume BMX tires to the Chariot to increase comfort and stability. The Chariot’s a capable trailer, and handles the roughest terrain with unexpected aplomb—but care has to be taken when riding up curbs or over rocky surfaces, as two wheelers can occasionally flip over.


During the last few months, we’ve borrowing a Tout Terrain Singletrailer. Although this single wheel design isn’t as versatile as the Chariot—it’s only a trailer, rather than a stroller, too—it performs superbly on singletrack, the ride is far smoother, and there’s less drag when accelerating (which, as Sage is now almost 40 pounds in weight, is very welcome). On the downside, the Singletrailer’s load capacity is limited and, although it folds into itself, it’s bulkier to travel with.

Note, too, that if you’re venturing abroad, a Chariot can masquerade as a stroller, traveling for free on airplanes (though I’d recommend wrapping it in a cover to protect it from the vagaries of the baggage handlers). I’d highly recommend both trailers in their own way. Both sport an eye-watering price tag, but if you intend to tour off road regularly, they make great investments and will really broaden the range of places you can explore.


In terms of family-orientated cargo bikes, the only model we’ve tried is Surly’s Xtracycle-compatible longtail. The Big Dummy is a superb vehicle for hauling a family’s worth of gear and food, while its extended deck provides ideal real estate for a Yepp Maxi child seat. Compared to a standard bike, there’s a ton of breathing room between rider and child.

Again, we fitted the Big Dummy with the biggest tires we could find—Surly’s new 2.5-inch ExtraTerrestrials—to help smooth out bumpy terrain.  For trips around town and shorter, fair weather tours, an Xtracycle is a very compelling option. Given that Sage is just about three, I expect he’ll be progressing to a tag-along bike in the next year or so, or perhaps a Weehoo iGo. That’s a world we’ll be delving into soon.


As for camping, we use a 3-person Big Agnes Copper Spur UL3. It’s light, roomy, easy to pitch and handles rain well. We also like our Black Diamond Mega Light tarp. Aside from being incredibly light and spacious, it’s perfect for grassy meadows and summer campouts—though watch out for ticks. Sage sleeps on a Therm-a-rest Prolite 3 Short sleeping pad, wrapped up in a Milk and Honey Down Sleep Sack and a down jacket. We’ve found this combination the best solution to his midnight wiggling. If it’s especially cold, he wears a woollen hat and gloves to bed. Much to his delight, Sage has his own headlamp, which he likes to wear when we read him his bedtime story. Gear is organized using Eagle Creek’s superlight Pack-It system—color coding keeps things fun.


We use denatured alcohol to cook as it’s clean and easy. Sage can almost match us for appetite, so we’ve recently graduated from our minimal 1.2 liter ti pot to a 2.8 liter enamel-coated cauldron, made by Evernew. We consider good food a key component to sucessful family camping, so we’re happy to haul the extra weight. Water is filtered via Platypus’ quick and easy Gravity Works, which we can hang off a tree while we’re busying ourselves around the campsite.


Sage’s toddler packlist

  • Milk and Honey Company down sleep sack
  • Merino wool sleep sack
  • Therm­a­rest Prolite 3 Short sleeping pad
  • Patagonia down sweater jacket
  • Patagonia hooded fleece jacket
  • Patagonia Torrentshell jacket
  • REI rain pants
  • Patagonia Capalene long underwear (used as Pjs)
  • NUI merino wool hat
  • 1 wool sweater
  • 2 pairs cotton sweatpants
  • 1 pair cotton leggings
  • 4 cotton shirts
  • 2 pairs shorts
  • 3 pairs of socks (2 cotton 1 wool )
  • Hand mitts
  • Sun Day Afternoon sun hat
  • High factor sun cream
  • High top shoes
  • 1 natural rubber pacifier
  • Favorite soft toy ­ Mono the Monkey
  • A couple small toys for trailer and soccer ball for campsite fun
  • Occasional Daniel Tiger and Sesame Street episodes on the iPad
  • Arnica for falls and bruises
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Klean Kanteen stainless steel water bottle for in the trailer
  • 2 cloth diapers for overnight accident prevention
  • Wipes
  • Black Diamond Wiz headlamp
  • Nutcase Watermelon Helmet



Shop Window: Revelate Designs introduces frame bags for touring bikes

Photos courtesy of Revelate Designs

Eric Parsons began his company making bags for Iditarod Trail racers from his basement apartment in Alaska. Now he’s grown the brand, Revelate Designs, into an industry leader in stock-size, American-made bikepacking and touring bags.


The latest product is a framebag built or road, gravel and touring bikes. While folks have been building custom bags like these for years, the new Ripio line offers four stock sizes that will fit most bikes. They are made from waterproof X-Pac woven panels with heavy duty, water-resistant zippers.



There is an exit port at the top for hydration tubes or wires for headlights or other accessories. The left side pocket is flat for small items or maps, while the main area has a horizontal Velcro divider that can divide it into two compartments with separate zippers.



There is an additional vertical divider at the top in the Large and XL sizes to keep it from bulging and interfering with your pedal stroke. There are also extra loops for securing a pump so it doesn’t sink to the bottom.


The Ripio bags are available now for $165 on the Revelate Designs website.



First ride on the new 2016 Salsa bikes


Somewhat surprising is this 29plus touring bike that Salsa says will be produced in somewhat limited numbers. More evolutionary than revolutionary, it’s kind of like what you’d expect to get if a Fargo and a Mukluk enjoyed a little too much bourbon around the campfire before snuggling into a sleeping bag together.


It’s built with Salsa’s more heavy duty Cobra Kai steel tubing also found on the Powderkeg tandem and Marrakesh touring bike. Here you’ll find all the features and mounts from a Fargo but with the Boost 148 spacing on the Alternator rear end to accommodate the 29×3 Surly Knard tires on WTB Scraper rims. The fork is identical to the standard Fargo model though.


The deep copper paint is lovely in person, and subtle touches like the special logo treatment and subdued graphics are really eye-catching.


I had a chance to take it for a quick spin and I think it could really be the perfect vehicle for riders who want to tackle touring/bikepacking routes at a more casual pace and are willing to trade some speed for comfort. The huge tires soak up the bumps without creating excess rolling resistance. My guess is it’s the kind of bike that will leave customers either salivating or scratching their heads.

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The Deadwood will retail for $2,599 or $1,099 for a frame/fork.


Salsa says the Tour Divide race was the inspiration for the Fargo model, but in the ensuing years the bar for speed has been raised (or lowered?) and top gravel racers are looking for something even lighter and more aggressive. The full carbon fiber Cutthroat is the result.


An even more streamlined vision of what the perfect Tour Divide race bike could be, the Cutthroat does away with the Alternator dropouts but still retains rack mounts near the dropouts. The triple cage mounts on the fork are still there too, as it shares the Firestarter carbon fork with the high-end Fargo model.

In the back is the new “Class 5 Vibration Reduction System” that made its debut on the Warbird gravel bike. In an effort to absorb impacts and vibrations the seatstays bow outward considerably to flex. When you’re racing 2,800 miles in two weeks on unpaved roads and trails, any bit helps.

The Cutthroat with a SRAM Rival 1×11 build is $3,999 and the SRAM Apex/X7 2×10 build is $2,999. The frame/fork can also be had for $1,999.



While the Vaya has been carrying the “light touring” torch in the Salsa lineup for a few years, the brand admits it can be a bit overwhelmed when carting heavy loads. The Marrakesh was built from from Salsa’s Cobra Kai steel tubing to carry you and ALL your gear to its namesake exotic lands.


A touring bike in the classic sense, it has a 3×9 drivetrain and bar-end shifters on the drop-bar model. The flat-bar model is an entirely different frame geometry to achieve proper fit, but is otherwise identical. Each version is available in two colors with a Shimano Deore kit, SRAM BB7 disc brakes, a rear rack and a Brooks saddle. The Alternator dropouts allow you to rig a singlespeed setup if you destroy a derailleur or to built one with an internal-gear hub.


The Marrakesh will retail for $1,599 or $650 for the frame/fork.



Spotted as a prototype at Sea Otter, the new 27plus full suspension bike from Salsa made its official debut today with two carbon fiber models and an aluminum model built around the excellent Split Pivot suspension.


If you’re ridden the Horsethief 29er and enjoyed it, you’re likely to feel right at home on the Ponyrustler, as they share geometry figures. In fact, the 2016 Horsetheif is the exact same frame and each model can swap wheels thanks to the Boost hub spacing front and rear. Salsa will continue to offer them as two distinct models though, and the ride experience is quite different.


A quick demo ride largely confirmed that the ride experience somewhat splits the difference between a normal 29er and a full suspension fat bike. Compared to the Bucksaw full suspension fat bike the Ponyrustler feels much faster and more like a “normal” bike while still offering the extra traction and compliance of the larger tires.


The frame offers 120 mm of travel the complete bikes ship with 130 mm forks, all with 110 mm Boost spacing. The Carbon XO1 model ships with the Pike and SRAM XO1, of course, for $5,499. The Carbon GX1 model has the Fox fork and a 1×11 GX build for $4,499. Finally, the aluminum Ponyrustler has a Fox fork and 2×10 GX build for $3,499. All three models ship with SRAM hubs laced to WTB Scraper rims with WTB’s new Bridger 27.5×3.0 tires. The carbon frame will also be available on its own for $2,499.



Are 27plus bikes going to be the new normal in a few years time? Don’t be surprised if they are.



Other changes in the Salsa line

Aside from spec and color changes, some notable tweaks:

  • The carbon Beargrease gets one of the coolest fade paint jobs ever. (Pictured above)
  • All of Salsa’s fat bikes now come with 150 mm spacing on the forks so they can be swapped with a RockShox Bluto if desired. Each of the hardtail fat bikes (Mukluk, Beargrease and Blackbarrow) is also available with one stock.
  • The Mukluk frame geometry changes to match that of the Blackbarrow.
  • The Spearfish is now available in carbon only, with two spec levels or a frame option.
  • The Fargo Ti rides off into the sunset, mostly supplanted by the Cutthroat.
  • The new carbon and aluminum Warbirds were unveiled earlier this year.
  • The Vaya Ti remains in the lineup as a complete bike or frameset.
  • The smallest Vaya models now use 700c wheels instead of 26-inch, and there are only six total sizes instead of eight.
  • The Colossal Ti rolls away, and the single steel model is offered with SRAM Apex or as a frameset.


The Cutthroat does indeed feature hidden rack mounts.


Kona adds some sweet road, cross and adventure bikes for 2016

Kona has been expanding away from its mountain bike background lately, and the sneak peak we got on the 2016 models takes things to the next level. Here are the four models that stood out the most to me.



Private Jake – $2,000

An all new aluminum frame offers modern updates like front and rear thru-axles, and geometry that is on the slack and low side for a cross bike. Combine that with sliding modular dropouts and a single-chainring specific design, and this might be more of a “fun bike” than race bike, and that is OK with us. It even has clearance for 40 mm tires.


Roadhouse – $2,400

Steel road frames and disc brakes aren’t common bedfellows. Which is a shame. The Roadhouse unashedly combines a Reynolds 853 steel frame, flat mount disc brakes and thru-axles for what is perhaps the most modern production steel road bike I’ve seen. But fear not, it isn’t all high-tech. Those looking closely will see rack and fender mounts. I am probably in the minority here, but about the only thing that would make this a better bike is a high-end steel fork.


Sutra LTD – $2,000

Fear not touring cyclists, the standard Sutra model is still around, still has a triple crank, Brooks saddle, and a rear rack. The Sutra LTD leans more towards use on unpaved roads and dirt. Combine a frame with lots of braze-ons,  a 1×11 SRAM drive train with a wide-range 10-42 cassette, hydraulic disc brakes and 47 mm tires, and you should be ready for anything from long dirt-road tours to detours on the way home from work.


Essatto Fast – $TBA

We have almost no info about this bike, but we do know there are a surprising number of riders that want the speed of a road bike without the drop bars. This looks like it should fit the bill nicely for those riders.


As of this posting, Kona’s website isn’t live with the new bikes yet, but it should be soon.

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