Year in review: Our best adventures of 2015

Our celebration of “everyday cycling” took many forms over 2015, from exploring local rides, local cycling culture and celebrating the people we ride with, to embarking on epic, multi-day bikepacking adventures from California and Washington to Laos and Bolivia. Below are some of the highlights of the past year from Bicycle Times staff and contributors. We hope you enjoyed the photography and storytelling from their adventures!

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Detroit Lake, Oregon

In January, our publisher and founder Maurice Tierney kicked off the new year with a bike camping adventure via the San Francisco Bay Trail. Then, in March, he gave us insight into what it’s like to be a judge at the North American Handmade Bicycle Show. Editor-in-chief Adam Newman took us on an exploration of Oregon’s Detroit Lake, a man-made reservoir that is drained annually by the state and leaves behind a unique landscape for riding on.

Laos

Laos. Photo: Mark Greiz

Bixby

Bixby and Mike Minnick

In the spring, Adam Perry rode Eroica California with Andy Hampsten on a 1980s Torelli 12-speed, and sent us a report. Mark Greiz took us to Laos where he cycled and bushwhacked across a harsh jungle landscape that he believed no one had ever pedaled through before. Our tech editor Eric McKeegan joined the Blackburn Rangers for a multi-day bikepacking camp in California that included a BB gun biathlon, surfing and eating pie. We also met Bixby, a Border-Collie mix riding across the country on a bike trailer with Mike Minnick, visiting animal shelters and aiding a grassroots campaign to support nonprofit animal shelters.

Pedal Fest

Pedal Fest. Photo: Rocky Arroyo

Over the summer, Rocky Arroyo checked out PedalFest, a celebration of cycling, family, music and much more in Oakland, California. Carole Trottere wrote a humorous, emotional letter to her first road bike when, after 20 years, she upgraded to a new ride. Newman wrote a scathing, raw opinion piece about cyclists maimed and killed by cars after several cyclists lives were taken in his home city of Portland.

Adventure Fest

Adventure Fest

In September, we celebrated the first-ever Bicycle Times Adventure Fest with 400 friends in the beautiful hills of central Pennsylvania. We also attended Interbike during which a pair of socks made headlines and our new web editor, Katherine Fuller, addressed the misogyny that persists in the bicycle industry.

Trans-America Trail

Trans-America Trail. Photo: Tom Swallow

The following month, Sarah and Tom Swallow wrapped up their 10-week bike ride on the Trans America Trail, a cross-country route from North Carolina to Oregon on mostly gravel, dirt and otherwise unpaved roads. Sean Jansen shared a story of touring Colombia’s coffee growing regions by bicycle and Cass Gilbert offered up his advice—based on extensive experience—for the best bike touring gear for family travel.

Iron Cross

Iron Cross

Bolivia. Photo: Cass Gilbert

Bolivia. Photo: Cass Gilbert

Also in October, Fuller, paid tribute to a fallen cyclist who was honored with a 24 hour bike ride up and down the mountain on which he was killed. On a lighter note, McKeegan raced Iron Cross XII, an event with something like 7000 feet of climbing over 64 miles, a half-mile “run up” that averaged 28 percent grade, miles of forests roads, a few stretches of technical rocky singletrack, 50 mph descents, and a wintery mix of sleet and snow. Cass Gilbert inspired many of our readers with his story and stunning photos of “fatpacking” Bolivia.

Fatsgiving

Fatsgiving

Touring outside of Seattle

Touring outside of Seattle. Photo: Russ Roca

Rounding out the year, Tierney and his friend Suzette Ayotte embarked on a wine tour by bicycle in California that moved about as slowly as expected. For the holidays, Newman brought you his second edition of “Fastgiving,” or riding fat bikes on sand at the Oregon Dunes. Russ Roca and Laura Crawford took us on a biking, camping and fly fishing adventure on the dirt roads outside of Seattle. On a tour fit for two, Justin Steiner and Emily Walley took off on a tandem adventure through the Allegheny National Forest. Finally, we visited REEB cycles and Oskar Blues brewing to talk Colorado-made bicycles and beer and the obvious combination of the two.

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In case you missed it, our most-talked about bike review was of the Trek 920. Newman so loved the dirt-road touring machine that he purchased one after testing it, but the debate still rages on about “why isn’t it made of steel?” We also took the wild and weird Cannondale Slate, a 650b “road” bike with a Lefty suspension fork, for an extended ride on both paved and dirt roads in California, and went on tour with Salsa’s new Powderkeg tandem, a steel bikepacking/mountain/dirt road bike.

bicycle-times-ask-beardo-food

Also in 2015, our resident advice columnist and curmudgeonly bicycle mechanic Beardo the Weirdo offered up his sage advice on whether or not you really need to wear Lycra, what to eat while riding, what’s up with cargo bikes and belt drives and how to properly load your panniers (or, more accurately, how to stop worrying about whether or not they’re loaded properly).

Cheers and thanks to everyone who made 2015 a good time. Here’s to continued exploration on two wheels in 2016.


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Allegheny National Forest touring tandemonium

From Issue #37
Words and Photos by Emily Walley and Justin Steiner

Tandem Tour Salsa-4

The thought of committing to a four-day, three-night touring adventure aboard the Salsa Powderkeg with almost zero tandem experience was a little bit intimidating. Would we be able to comfortably carry all of our gear? How would we manage some of the rougher dirt roads and trails we planned to traverse in Pennsylvania’s Allegheny National Forest?

Despite these reservations, our excitement to share this new experience was thrilling, and we quickly got to work acclimating to life aboard a bicycle built for two. Not long into the first road ride, our confidence swelled as it became apparent we were aboard a very competent and capable rig. But, we also realized that we needed to recalibrate our approach slightly. As independent cyclists we’ve grown accustomed to making forceful and sometimes aggressive maneuvers on the bike. Those inputs don’t jive well in tandem land. Subtle inputs and smooth transitions are the name of the game.

Tandem Tour Salsa-9

With one road ride under our belt, we jumped to the next logical step: mountain biking. On the Powderkeg, our standard weekly Thursday ride became a whole new adventure and a barrel of fun. Dropping into the first trail was a little rough as trail features we haven’t thought about in years suddenly tested our capability. We were both tense and our inputs were fighting each other. It’s amazing how much influence the stoker has on the bike, despite the lack of ability to steer. The stoker’s wide bar provided a lot of leverage. We occasionally found it helpful for Emily to move her hands to the center of the bars, minimizing her upper body input. Riding as a stoker requires a lot of leg input and a very relaxed upper body.

Tandem Tour Salsa-10

Not long after we ran poor Emily into the first tree, forcing us to jointly dismount, we began to relax and started into a rhythm together. Amazingly, that first near-crash (and the many that followed) made us realize abrupt dismounts were totally manageable, as was dabbing a foot when necessary to right the ship. We found it helpful for the stoker to remain on the bike and let the captain dab whenever possible. This way Emily could help propel the bike forward on an ascent or technical terrain while Justin resumed his position. From that point on, we were golden, at least once the captain came to terms with just how wide he had to turn so as to not run his stoker into any more trees.

Throughout that first mountain bike ride, we continued to be amazed by the capability of the Powderkeg. With such a long wheelbase the stability is incredible. As long as we kept the pedals turning, we could crank, albeit slowly, up just about anything. We knew we were ready to tackle some reasonably rough and tumble terrain, so long as it didn’t involve a lot of big rocks and logs as it’s awfully easy to high-center.Tandem Tour Salsa-3

A Blessing and a Curse

With our confidence high and our communication dialed, we began planning and packing for our tour of a portion of the more than 500,000-acre Allegheny National Forest (ANF). Like most of our National Forests, the ANF is a “working forest,” meaning managed natural gas and oil extraction as well as selective timber harvests provide operational revenue and economic impact within the local community.

While the harvesting of natural resources may be a point of contention now, this forest’s history is far uglier than today’s sustainability managed approach. By the early 1900’s, nearly all of this land, and most all of Pennsylvania for that matter, was clear cut by private companies trying to meet burgeoning demand for lumber for everything from construction to wood pulp for paper to wood chemical production—acetic acid, wood alcohol and acetate of lime. During the Civil War, tanneries used immense amounts of hemlock bark to keep up with leather production.

Tandem Tour Set 2-2

After the trees were gone, the land was abandoned. In 1923, the Federal Government purchased this land and established the ANF, as authorized by the Weeks Act of 1911. At the time, locals called this shrub-filled wasteland the “Allegheny Brush-patch.”

Unfortunately, when the Federal Government purchased the ANF, funding limitations lead to purchasing only the surface rights. Ninety-three percent of the ANF’s subsurface rights are privately held, which has led to extensive oil and natural gas extraction. In 1981, this region produced roughly 17 percent of Pennsylvania’s total crude oil output.

Tandem Tour Set 2-5

While there are many undeniable downsides to these industries, one of the upsides comes in the form of forest roads. After decades of drilling and logging, forest roads criss-cross a majority of the forest. Some are open to vehicular traffic, others have long since been closed to motor vehicles. Some barely even exist.

So long as you’re away from extraction traffic, these roads are perfect for touring. You’re off the beaten path, but the terrain is mellow enough that you’re able to comfortably cover ground on a loaded touring bike. But, it’s also just technical enough to keep things interesting. For the most part, forest roads tend to be well signed, so they’re easily navigable. For this trip, the ANF’s administrative map proved to be the right tool for for planning and navigating. These administrative maps show all of the forest roads, whether they’re gated or open to the public. Online maps and gazetteers can’t always be trusted when it comes to showing which roads are navigable and which aren’t.

Tandem Tour Set 2-1

After spending way too many hours staring at maps drawing and redrawing routes, we settled on three beautiful, remote locations to camp and connected the dots with as much dirt and as little hike-a-bike as possible.

Packing turned out to be easier than feared. With racks and panniers at both ends, a frame bag up front, one Salsa Anything Cage and Anything Bag, six water bottles and a snack bag, we were set. (Visit bicycletimesmag.com/tandem_anf to see detailed setup info.) Here, the Powderkeg again impressed us with its versatility and plethora of options for mounting and hauling gear.

Tandem Tour Set 2-3

On the Road

Day one consisted of a long, long climb from the reservoir’s edge up a drainage to the top of the plateau, rolling ridgetop pavement, and a steep descent back to the water’s edge to a boat-in-only campsite. Toward the end of the day, we experienced the first of many mini-frustrations. Know how you tend to get fidgety toward the end of a long day in the saddle? Well, that mutual fidgeting and fatigue isn’t the best for morale when every little wiggle and wobble is transmitted to your partner in crime.

After a fitful night’s sleep trying to keep a portly raccoon out of our food stash—Blackburn’s awesome Outpost Top Tube bag may be water resistant, but it’s not coon-proof—we made a fatigued pushed up out of the valley.

In the late afternoon, we rolled into a beautiful, secluded campsite upstream from a fish hatchery. Water rumbling over a small dam provided the perfect soundtrack for a good night’s sleep.

Tandem Tour Salsa-6

Day three took us to Heart’s Content Scenic Area, one of approximately 20 stands of old-growth forest remaining in all of Pennsylvania. Walking through this forest, it’s hard to believe the entire state was once covered by these giants. Shame of it is, many of these trees are nearing the end of their lifecycle. Each year a few more fall down.

The highlight of this day was bombing five miles down hill on an old timber-era, narrow-gauge rail corridor. All loaded down and traveling on this sometimes-rough surface, the Powderkeg rolled with a confidence that encouraged more speed, despite the rain. This and many other downhills made me thankful for the large disc brake rotors. Even with those big rotors, we often smelled hot brakes on descents.

Tandem Tour Set 2-4

After a big day in the saddle and one lengthy, uphill, bushwhacking hike-a-bike, our last night camping was by far the most spectacular, right at the base of an underappreciated and positively gorgeous waterfall. We hustled to beat the rain into camp, which hammered down just moments after we finalized our tarp setup. Thanks to the day’s rain, it only took a dozen attempts to get a decent fire going. With nearly a month of rain prior to our trip, the falls were running ample and loudly, making for another good night’s sleep.

After a short trip back to the car on day four, we were happy to be easing back into civilization. It’s funny how being mostly remote for not even four full days provides a whole different perspective on your day-to-day existence.

Tandem Tour Salsa-5

In all, this trip was everything we had hoped it would be. We had a blast sharing a local adventure, but more importantly, touring on a tandem undoubtedly made us both more connected, conscientious, considerate partners.

Continue reading with our full field review of the Salsa Powderkeg.


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Review: Salsa Powderkeg Tandem

From Issue #37
Testers: Justin Steiner and Emily Walley

To see action photos and learn more about this bike, check out the multi-day bikepacking adventure that begat this review by reading “Allegheny National Forest touring tandemonium” from the same issue.

Salsa Powderkeg-1

Salsa first began prototyping tandems back in 2010 when former Salsa Engineer Tim Krueger and his wife Odia saw other couples racing the Chequamegon Fat Tire Festival’s Short and Fat Race on tandems. Now, many prototype miles later, including a trip down the Tour Divide,the production Powderkeg is here.

While the Powderkeg is inspired by Salsa’s El Mariachi 29er mountain bike, the construction is much burlier. Salsa utilizes downright huge Cobra Kai tubes custom drawn for this project on the frame and fork to minimize flex. Despite the heavy-duty construction, the complete bike weighs just 42 pounds.

Salsa Powderkeg-5

Three frame sizes are available; medium/small, large/small and large/medium. According to Salsa, those offerings will fit captains from five feet, eight inches to six feet, three inches. Stokers from five feet, five inches to six feet even. It’s worth noting we’re both one inch shorter than the minimum stated fit range but had no issues fitting on the bike. Emily ran the standard stoker stem and Justin swapped to a 60 mm stem.

Salsa bills the Powderkeg as a mountain, gravel and touring bike. Big brakes and aggressive knobby tires hold up the mountain bike end of the bargain so long as you’re willing. On the touring side, a plethora of rack, water bottle and three-pack mounts provide ample options for hauling stuff and mounting fenders. Salsa’s Alternator rear dropout system works incredibly well with the company’s Alternator Rack, but doesn’t play as nicely with other racks.

Salsa Powderkeg-8

The rest of the Powderkeg’s spec is well thought out and reliable without being overly pricey. The Shimano SLX 3×10 drivetrain worked flawlessly and provided all the gearing range we needed. Avid BB7 cable-actuated brakes with 200 mm rotors provided ample stopping power and resisted fading throughout our testing.

It’s clear Salsa invested and lot of time and energy in this project and their hard work has paid off. The Powderkeg is a cohesive, rough and ready package. I’m so impressed with the ride quality and stiffness of this frame. Fully loaded for camping or on technical singletrack we never perceived a bit of fork or frame flex, which is incredible considering the length of the bike and the force two people can apply.

Salsa Powderkeg-6

The Powderkeg’s handling is similarly impressive. Of course, riding a tandem requires some adjustment, this bike’s 70-degree headtube angle and long wheelbase blend low-speed maneuverability and high-speed stability very well, regardless of whether bombing singletrack or cruising dirt roads. At tandem-friendly-speeds off road, I never felt much need for a suspension fork, but a 100 mm tandem-rated suspension fork may be used. Unlike a single bike, each person is only really dealing with the impacts from one wheel. The other wheel is so far away the bump forces are much smaller.

Salsa Powderkeg-7

The Powderkeg is one of just a few off-the-shelf mountain tandems available. Cannondale offers the Tandem 29er for $3,125 with some compelling component spec, but it doesn’t offer comparable touring versatility and has a strangely steep 72.5-degree headtube angle.

Aside from that, nearly every other tandem in this category hails from a smaller company and commands a premium. For instance, Co-Motion’s Java 29er starts at $5,595. Ventana offers a handful of tandems; the full suspension El Conquistador de Montañas 29er starts at $6,000 and the rigid, fat-wheel El Gran Jefe ranges from $3,200 to $6,500. All of these make the adventure-ready Powderkeg seem like a pretty good deal at $3,999.

More info from Salsa Cycles


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