PBE 2017: Pedalino Bicycles

Julie Ann Pedalino’s bikes are beautiful. Vibrantly-colored, with intricate detail work. When you learn her story, it’s no surprise. With a background of over ten years in the fine arts and graphic design business, she carries her creativity and love for panache over to her latest endeavor, bicycle framebuilding.

After developing a love for cycling and wrenching on bikes, and then spending considerable time mentoring under framebuilders Vincent Rodriguez and Doug Fattic, Julie began building her own frames three years ago. She does it on a part-time basis (while working as a graphic designer the rest of the time), and has built about 20 frames so far, all of which are fillet brazed steel.

Julie enjoys working with steel for a number of reasons. “First, and perhaps most importantly,” she says, ” I think the ride quality and buttery road feel of steel is unmatched!” The material also lends itself to creativity, is readily available and relatively inexpensive, and is fairly easy to machine.

Photo: Brett Rothmeyer

Photo: Brett Rothmeyer

Photo: Brett Rothmeyer

Photo: Brett Rothmeyer

She builds fit-focused bikes for all types of riders, but especially loves building for small people because she understands that it can be very hard to find a bike that fits if you’re under 5’3″ and a lot of bike companies make “undesirable design compromises in order to manufacture frames for the typical range of average riders.” She also loves working with proportional wheels sizes – so smaller wheels for smaller bikes. She’s made a number of road and cross bikes designed around 650 rather than 700c wheelsets.

“I really love working with clients to create a bike that they have a personal connection with and are inspired by,” Julie says. “I’m an artist, and it’s important to me to not only create beautiful things, but to create things that have an impact on my audience. While I love the traditional art media, it’s amazing to me that a bicycle has the possibility to become a truly transformative factor in a person’s life in a way that a drawing or painting is unlikely to do.”

pedalino-5

One of Julie’s favorite bikes she’s ever built was one of her early works – a 650c road bike that was her first fancy lug bilaminate frame, built while still under the apprenticeship of Doug Fattic. “The process of building it really opened my eyes to the possibilities for creativity within frame building,” she says. She cut all the lugs by hand, so it was extremely time and labor intensive, and it’s a bike that fits her and she loves to ride, solidifying her connection with the work.

So what does the future hold for Julie Pedalino? She’d like to continue to explore the possibilities of CAD based design and CNC machining. She would also love to grow her business so that she can not only support herself, but also allow her to bring in talent and build an amazing team. “It’s always been my dream to create space, opportunity, and exposure for as many creative folks as possible!,” she says.

“Finally,” she concludes, “I want to make an impact and be an inspiration for other women who (like I was not too long ago) aren’t aware of or exposed to the fact that they can do this sort of thing, too! The more noise we make, the easier it to be to get the message out there that girls and women can not only participate in, but excel at engineering, machining, and metal fabrication.”

Photo: Brett Rothmeyer

Photo: Brett Rothmeyer

pedalino-10

Find out more at www.pedalinobicycles.com.

Print
Back to Top