The Family Adventure Project

10 Lessons from 10 Years Adventuring with Kids

Words and photos: Stuart Wickes

Ten years ago, my wife Kirstie and I started The Family Adventure Project after making resolutions to put our family first. We wrote some ideas down and promised each other we’d act on them. Over the years, those handwritten notes became a website and now a blog, recording all the things we’ve done together, providing lasting memories of our little and big adventures and reminding us not to settle for a life less lived. Here is some of what we have learned.

Family Adventure Project Team Cycling in Japan on Shimanami Kaido Cycle Route

Family Adventure Project Team Cycling in Japan on Shimanami Kaido Cycle Route

Lesson 1: Newborns can travel, too

Babies don’t melt if you take them out in the rain and they don’t break if you hike them up a mountain. Sure, those early months and years are a precious and demanding time, but you don’t have stay at home to enjoy them. You might as well have no sleep in a place you’ll remember.

Lesson 2: Toddlers are easier in the outdoors

Toddlers were made for stamping in puddles, for gathering up leaves in the woods and for stuffing twigs into pockets. The outdoors is a great big playground. It’s also free. Why visit expensive fun factories or waste money on play barns when you can explore the world together at no cost? Take a wagon of snacks and go see what’s out there.

Lesson 3: Tweens and teens bring challenges wherever they are

Everyone knows children can be challenging, tweens and teens especially, so why not let them sulk in a pleasant environment? Give them the chance to say what’s on their mind without the distractions of everyday life. Spend time with them now, keep those communications channels open and you can build relationships that will survive almost anything.

Family Adventuring-3

Lesson 4: The world is a natural learning environment

School is a great thing, but the world is the most effective teacher there is. Just think of all the subjects that crop up when you’re out exploring the real world. History, geography, science, maths, art and languages never feel like a chore when they’re studied as part of a journey.

Lesson 5: Family life is more fun when you’re together

So much of daily life is spent in separate rooms, or even separate buildings. Come together once in awhile and get to know each other. Build up a bank of shared experiences that you can draw on. It’ll help to ground you for when more difficult times set in.

Lesson 6: You don’t need all that stuff. Really, you don’t

Life is about people. Ditch the stuff and try playing with each other for a change. Even the littlest member of the family can make a doll out of a stick and we’re constantly surprised by how many games they can all create from a pocket full of stones.

Lesson 7: Taking on new challenges boosts confidence

Who doesn’t want confident children? Every time you go on a journey together, go somewhere new or try something different you create an opportunity to learn new skills for yourself and the rest of the family. You’ll discover that you and your family can deal with way more than you think and that’s great for everyone’s confidence.

Picnic Stop, Eden Valley

Lesson 8: Adventures create strong reminders of their childhood

Children grow up in the blink of an eye and, let’s face it, a lot of regular life isn’t really that memorable. Adventure ramps up the number of new situations, people and places we encounter. It stirs up emotions of all kinds and deepens and tests relationships, which creates front, shared memories.

Lesson 9: Getting out with the kids keeps you fit not fat

Middle aged spread setting in? Get on your bikes. Or up a mountain. The children will be fitter than you, and closer to their peak. Let that be a challenge not a problem. If the kids are eating too many trans fats then make them burn them off. They’ll thank you when their own middle age sets in.

Lesson 10: Parenthood is short

You think it will last forever. It doesn’t. Make the most of it while you can.


Stuart Wickes and his wife Kirstie lead the Family Adventure Project, a UKbased website that chronicles its adventures online and beyond in an effort to encourage families get out, get active and adventure together. Learn more at familyadventureproject.org.

 

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