Avoid Dropper Post Installation Mayhem and/or Amplify Your Confusion with these Tips!

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Everyone rides a dropper post right? Bicycle Times contributor Scott Wilson is a believer! Let us listen for a second as he shares this novel idea-Ed.

By Scott Wilson

You ride up to a red light and all the other jokers in the bike lane line up in various states of immobile balance. Someone has both feet flat on the ground and bike in between, reminiscent of the kid who drops his shorts all the way to his ankle at the urinal; another has one leg down and one up on the pedal, like a Lycra flamingo; the worst of them tries to track stand, fails, lurches forward a pedal rotation then tries again but halfway in the intersection this time.

You’ve seen it; you’ve been there.

Now imagine if you could just flip a switch to lower both feet onto the ground without removing your butt from the saddle. Imagine: stoplights become a pleasure, a chance to sit comfortably and inhale the vibrant world around you. Imagine the awe of your fellow commuters, watching, transfixed, as you lower yourself like some kind of technologically advanced alien sex god.

This dream can be your reality, but before you jump straight into the bike tech avant-garde, here are some of the little details people tend to overlook that will determine your success with the drop.

Before you buy, these are the measurements you should take.

Tools needed: Calipers and tape measure. Maybe some hex keys. 

  1. Stock seatpost diameter and/or seat tube inner diameter. If they don’t make a dropper post to match your frame: dang.

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  1. Distance from seat tube collar to saddle rails. Seatpost companies advertise 100mm drop or 120mm drop, but that’s just a measure of how much the saddle goes up and down, it doesn’t account for the size of the saddle cradle or the crown at the base of the stanchion. The minimum height for the “100mm” dropper post in the picture is actually 158mm when fully extended.

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  1. Internal seat tube depth. There are mysteries inside the bike frame. I’ve found Chinese candy wrappers, cigarette butts, and all kinds of mischief in brand new bikes, but if you have a small frame the most worrisome obstructions are the things that can’t be removed: water bottle bosses and fender braze-ons. To find what’s in there, loosen your seatpost collar and let your stock seatpost drop as far as it can, then pull it out and measure the distance between the seatpost collar and the base of the seat post. You might need 250mm or more to fit a dropper.

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  1. Handlebar clamp diameter. Stock dropper post control levers are usually made for 22.2 handlebars, so a lot of drop-bars are too big, even at their thinnest point, but some companies make a lever for 31.8 bars. If you’re tricksy you can retrofit a shifter to work as the dropper lever. There are guides on how to do that elsewhere on the Internet.

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“But what if my post bottoms out on something inside the frame?”

Water bottle bosses are the most likely enemy. Sometimes all you have to do is take out the water bottle bolt and that’ll give it the room it needs. There might also be a burr down there, which you can remove using a cylinder hone on an electric drill. Do not use a reamer or any other cutting tool because seat tubes are wicked thin and you’re liable to cut right through.

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“But what if the dropper post sticks up too far and my stinking feet can’t touch the pedals?”

How comfortable are you with cutting pieces off your frame? Some frames come with what frame builders call “smokestacks” – a section of seat tube that sticks out beyond the top tube junction. These smokestacks might be longer than necessary. Or, they might be exactly as long as they need to be. Only one way to find out for sure: use a hacksaw to cut a bit of spare stack away, then smooth it down with a file. Keep cutting, little by little, until you’ve effectively lowered the max saddle height, or until you’ve ruined your frame forever.

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Now that you have the dropper post down in the sweet spot, let’s figure out cable routing.

Tools needed: cable/housing cutters, 1.5mm to 4mm hex keys, zip ties?

This is the fun part. The cyclocross frame in the pictures has an extra braze-on for top-swing front derailleurs so I was able to run the cables through there, easy cheesey. Don’t have extra housing braze-ons? Don’t worry! Zip ties work fine. I suggest you tie up to the brake housing instead of the frame because it won’t move around as much. You can also buy housing guides that mount around the top tube.

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Before you cut the cable and housing, make sure that you can move the handlebars back and forth, all the way.

PRO TIP: Dropper post cables often come with what nerds call “compressionless housing” or “shift housing” to the layperson. The problem with compressionless housing is that it isn’t very flexible. Instead, I use brake housing, which handles bendy routing a lot better. I use a 5mm to 4mm stepped ferrule at the end to fit the housing into the dropper post cable-stop and the lever cable-stop. The bad part about brake housing is that when you flex it a lot the metal coil inside lengthens, effectively pulling on the cable. To overcome this, install the cable with an itty-bitty-bit of slack. Also, the dropper post is designed to work with a thin cable, while the brake housing is meant for a thick one. It’ll wear out quicker than normal. Deal with it.

Frequently Asked Questions:

“The saddle drops whenever I turn the handlebars. Whuddupwiththat?”

The housing might be too short, or the cable might be too tight. Make sure the housing isn’t pulling out of the ferrule when you turn. Also, installing a flexible elbow bend (sometimes called a noodle) might help.

“The saddle returns super slowly.”

You might just need to give the cable some more slack, or there might be some drag in the housing or lever. Might as well give up.

“I hit the lever but the shit don’t drop.”

First, try putting your weight on the saddle, dummy. If that doesn’t do it, then you might need to tighten up your cable, and double check that all your fasteners are tight too.

“At first it worked great, but now it keeps dropping when I don’t want it to.”

The housing might have dislocated from the ferule, so check that.

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“My dropper post has an electronic/hydraulic lever so none of this applies to me, but I’m still having problems.”

That’s what you get for trying to be fancy. Did you plug it in? Try turning it off and on. Is there even fluid in it? Air bubbles? If it’s an electric dropper and there’s fluid all over, then you’re really in trouble. Good luck, sucker.

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BIO: Scott Wilson has been repairing bicycles in shops across the United States for over a decade. He’s an acolyte of Doug Fattic’s frame building praxis and a dubious mentor for the next generation. He has an MFA in nonfiction writing and sometimes teaches English, whether asked to or not. Visit his blog: www.bikeblogordie.com

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Review: PNW Components Rainier 27.2 dropper post

By Eric McKeegan

I was first introduced to the importance of the dropper post during the BC Bike Race, a seven day mountain bike stage race in British Columbia. The idea of riding unfamiliar technical terrain at higher speeds made the dropper post on my loaner bike very much an “Ah-ha!” moment. But how does that translate to a dropper post on a drop-bar bike?

For those that aren’t familiar with this technology, a dropper post allows for seat height adjustment while riding, most often via a handlebar mounted remote. A lower seat allows for more room to move around on the bike, in turn providing more control on steep and/or rough terrain.

I’ve been using this post on a Specialized AWOL, which has a sloping top tube and quite a bit of exposed seatpost. You’ll need at least 163 mm of post from the seat collar to the saddle rails to make this work. The stock remote lever only works with 22.2 flat bars, but I got a prototype 31.8 lever that worked very well mounted next to stem.

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The Rainier works as well as any dropper I’ve used, sliding up and down smoothly. Even without an adjustable return rate, I never thought it was too slow or fast. The 80 mm of drop is scant compared to the 125 mm to 170 mm that is standard for mountain bikes these days, but seems plenty to make things more fun and controllable on drop-bar bikes.

On long road descents it is nice to have another position, whether tucked in low or just loafing on the lowered seat. For improved cornering, there really is nothing like dropping your center of gravity to feel connected to the bike and the road. When venturing off the pavement it is hard to describe just how much it can improve the riding experience.

Instead of needing to get as far behind the saddle as possible on steep descents, you can crouch over the seat, keeping weight on the front end for traction, but keeping that weight well behind the front axle. Staying closer to the bar allows your arms to stay more bent, helping to steer and absorb bumps much better than the straight arm position that is the result of being stuck behind the saddle.

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I see this post working well for a few types of riders. Mountain bikers who have grown to love the dropper post can now have the same thing on their road-oriented bikes or experienced riders that want to make their all-around bike (like the AWOL) as capable as possible. Finally, for beginner riders who are timid, the ability to lower the seat at the touch of a button can add an impressive amount of confidence.

This may seem like another “gadget” for your bike, and, admittedly, you could go through your riding life and enjoy yourself immensely without a dropper. But I see the dropper as an amplifier that can turn the fun factor of your ride experience up to 11 at the touch of the remote. It is up to you if that is too loud, or not.

MSRP: $275


This review was originally published in Bicycle Times 43. Check out more of our reviews online here and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to get fresh content delivered to your inbox every Tuesday! 

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