Blackburn Rangers take to the road

It was imperative that we stay vigilant against the danger. Our enemy would not discriminate. Young or old, strong or feeble, all were within its sights. It could sink its vicious teeth into our flesh and not release for days or weeks. Few would escape our journey without falling victim to its ruthless aggression.

Our expedition leader and Blackburn’s brand manager, Robin, tried in vain to prepare us for the threat. He gathered us up and spoke in hushed tones.

“It’s important to remember that if you’re not on the trail, you are almost certainly standing in poison oak.”

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It was a valiant warning, especially since I’m still scratching two weeks later. I joined Blackburn and its 2016 class of Blackburn Rangers for an introductory ride through the mountains of coastal California. With a little help from Santa Cruz and Big Agnes we escaped from the arid asphalt plains of the San Jose airport parking lot and ascending through sun, wind, mist and fog to a quiet Boy Scout camp perched high in the hills above the city. Tucked beneath the massive evergreens we cooled our heels and warmed our hearts with a campfire and some of Kentucky’s finest.

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Blackburn is the kind of brand that doesn’t just spit out products to make a buck. They’re out there using these things—both the employees and the brand’s annual group of Blackburn Rangers. The six Rangers chosen for 2016 will complete some of the most famous bike touring routes in North America. While off-road bikepacking is very on-trend right now, it’s really bike travel of all kinds that Blackburn is promoting, as many of the routes its Rangers travel are entirely paved.

Meet the Rangers

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Brian Ohlen – Cody, Wyoming

Brian hails is an avid fisherman and cyclist.  He intends to combine his passions and bike-fish his way from Canada to Mexico, in search of the elusive Steelhead Trout.

What is your goal for the route?

“I’d love to catch a steelhead in each of the three states I’ll travel through. Three fish doesn’t sound like much, but those buggers are hard to catch!”

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Sorry Laura, this is the only photo of you I took.

Katie Hawkins and Laura Brigham – East Palo Alto, California

Katie, left, and Laura, right, are neighbors in East Palo Alto and decided to apply together to tackle the Great Divide this summer.

What do you hope to get out of this journey?

Laura: “I hope to share the enthusiasm that I have for biking and the outdoors with those on the Great Divide as well as those following from home. I hope at the end of this crazy ‘Canadian gone Mexican’ adventure, Katie and I will leave with unforgettable memories, strong legs, sweet tan lines, and a bunch of awesome new friends.”

Katie: “I see this as a soul-searching adventure for 2 months. I want to be able to get away from my normal 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. job and be on an adventure that separates me from life’s distractions. I want to share my experiences with various biking communities along the route and hope to learn from them, as well.”

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Courtney Lewis – Brooklyn, New York

Courtney followed the Blackburn Ranger program for the last few years, and the variety of their backgrounds and approaches were immediate inspiration for her to tackle the same path in her own way. Courtney’s ‘own way’ includes stepping off the bike and hiking nearby summits along the route, and also bringing her dog along.

What do you hope to get out of this journey?

“I’m excited to shake up my routine, and the routines of my friends (and friends-to-be!) along the way. I want to push my limits to get the most out of the time I have, and to learn more about myself.”

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Ivan Kilroe – Lancaster, Great Britain

Ivan has a great approach to cycling that is based on sharing beauty and joy with friends that we can appreciate.

Have you traveled by bike in the past?

“In the last year I’ve done a handful of short trips travelling by bicycle and really enjoyed the freedom you feel from carrying everything you need to survive. I’ve definitely got a bad case of ‘outdoorism’ – seeing the sun rise and set everyday, and waking up outside all becomes kind of addictive.”

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Photo by John Watson

Christian Ayoob – Watkinsville, Georgia

Christian hails from the robust , but often overlooked, cycling community around Athens, Georgia, and is one of the first Southerners that has been selected as a Ranger.

What do you hope to get out of this journey?

“By the end of this journey, I hope to have collected stories, met as many people as possible, and all around have had fun. Along with doing this, I would love to have a very detailed journal and blog for others to follow and get inspired.”

While the Rangers plan to ride thousands of miles, you don’t need to quit your job and drop off the grid to have a great adventure on a bike. Most of Blackburn’s products are just as useful on a commute to school as they are on the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route.

New gear

We also got a look at some of Blackburn’s newest products on the ride:

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Blackburn’s unique frame bags ($60 or $65) come in two sizes and are expandable depending on your cargo needs. They’ve been updated with stronger zippers and will soon be available in a limited-edition camo print. The Seat Pack ($120) and Handlebar Roll ($100) will be available in camo as well. All the bags will continue to be available in black.

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These little 2Fer lights were one of my favorites. These $25 USB-rechargeable lights have a clip on the back that holds them snug on a loop like you find on backpacks, or on the included stretchy strap. The name derives from their ability to run with white or red LEDs so they can go front or back.

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The new Switch Mini multi-tool is a bit of a crossover between something that stays packed away with your bike stuff and your at-home tool kit. There are four pieces with a tool at each end that can be held either perpendicular or inline with the handle. The rounded ends make it useful when working in tight spaces where you can’t hold the tool perfectly inline with the bolt. It includes a 2.5 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, 6 mm, T25 Torx, T30 Torx and a flat head screwdriver that all pack away in the included case, with room to spare for an ID and a couple bucks.

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My favorite item introduced was the new Chamber HV floor pump ($80), the highlight of a whole new line of floor pumps. Designed for big tires, it has a high volume piston and a HUGE gauge that only goes to 50 psi. Some trick features include a bleed valve in the head for precise pressures, a bottle opener (natch) and a 31.8 mm clamp for the handle that lets you bolt on an old set of handlebars for some custom flair.

More photos

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Video: Specialized Adventure Dispatch x Sarah and Tom Swallow

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Courtesy of Specialized

In this episode of The Adventure Dispatch, we head out on an overnight ride with Sarah Swallow through the Humboldt Redwood State Park. Sarah is an expert when it comes to creative route planning, which is why we’re happy that she decided to share her methodology for sub-24-hour overnight riding (S24O). So take notes or just enjoy the scenery and get motivated, because you’re about to learn what happens when you saddle-up, slow down, and take notice of the world around you.

Read more about the Swallow’s pioneering ride along the Trans American Trail.

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Film: the California Sierra Trail Race

As more and more riders find themselves pulled by the lull of adventure in big mountains, new bikepacking races and events are popping up across the country. The California Sierra Trail Race is a self-supported monster and one of the few that makes a loop back to its starting point, in this case Auburn, California. While it might make the logistics of participating a bit easier, the ride is anything but: 430 miles and 70,000 feet of climbing along old roads and singletrack in the Sierra Nevada mountains.

This short film by Aaron Johnson gives some background on how the route came together and follows the second running of the race in July 2014, when only four men lined up at the starting line. Will you be there this year?

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Bicycle Times visits SRAM’s California research and development lab

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In 1998, a small group of California engineers developed bicycle components and called the company TruVativ. Six years later, the mighty SRAM purchased the San Luis Obispo company, followed by the company’s introduction of its Rival, then Force, then Red road group sets. We were in the area for a Zipp 30 Course wheel introduction, so on the way out of town we toured the new SRAM lab, a brand-new 20,000-square foot facility across from the SLO airport, about a mile down the road from the original 8,600-square foot building. Thirty employees—engineers, lab technicians, marketing, public relations and machine shop wizards—share a custom work space which might be the envy of the industry.

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The SRAM SLO lab is where drivetrain components, seat posts, cranksets, handlebars and stems are developed, prototyped, and tested until failure. It’s in the early stages of development, and we weren’t able to take photos of the early development stuff, but one thing stood out: engineers have the equipment necessary to create a carbon prototype crankset in-house and have it on the stress test machines the next day, a process that just a few years ago would take months.

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And yes, SRAM breaks a lot of stuff. They break stuff so you don’t have to!

And with the recent introduction of its expanded 1x drivetrain platform, it was cool to watch their chainline test, which took cross chaining to the extreme.

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Shifting and all it encompasses includes too many variables for a feeble-minded journalist to count, but SRAM built its own test mule to cover all possibilities.

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Zipp brand manager Declan Doyle—based in Indianapolis—hails from the Emerald Isle, and was pleased to see a conference room named in his honor.

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This man gets to build prototypes, and has the world-class equipment to play with every day. Can’t wait to see how his workspace evolves over the next few months.

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More photos

Click the magnifying glass to enlarge photos:

 

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Preview: 25th Sea Otter Classic in Monterey, California

Photo: Louie Traub

Photo: Louie Traub

The 2015 Sea Otter Classic will be held April 16-19, 2015, at the Laguna Seca Recreation Area in Monterey, California, home to Formula 1 and past MotoGP racing, and the Bicycle Times editorial team will descend to scour the aisles for new product news.

Photo: Louie Traub

Photo: Louie Traub

This four-day cycling festival features a full schedule of amateur and professional events, where nearly 10,000 domestic and international athletes compete over four days. The Sea Otter Classic also plays host to the largest consumer bike exposition in North America with 411 exhibitors and 65,000 attendees, but how and when did it begin?

“You guys should put on a mountain bike race.” That simple statement from a Monterey bike shop owner in 1990 was the genesis for the Laguna Seca Challenge, later renamed the Sea Otter Classic.

Co-founders Frank Yohannan and Lou Rudolph hosted the inaugural Laguna Seca Challenge on April 6 and 7, 1991. The event had a total of 350 athletes and 150 spectators. In 1993, the Laguna Seca Challenge was renamed the Sea Otter Classic. By 2010, the Sea Otter Classic had become a four-day celebration of cycling welcoming more than 8,500 athletes and 50,000 fans. The event is now regarded as the bicycle world’s premiere festival and one of the world’s largest. The little mountain bike race has grown up.

Photo: Louie Traub

Photo: Louie Traub

Racers make the annual pilgrimage to Sea Otter to participate in cycling’s best competitive and non-competitive events. Nearly 200 classes of amateur road and mountain bike racing for all ages and skill levels will toe the line. Mountain bike races include cross-country, dual slalom, downhill, and more. Road cyclists can choose from road and circuit racing on the world-famous Laguna Seca Raceway. And for those who want to bike in less-competitive fashion, Sea Otter offers the Gran Fondo, with two distance options.

Photo: Alex Strickland

Photo: Alex Strickland

The Sea Otter Village, hub of the event, pulses with free bike demos, stunt shows, and live entertainment, plus kids’ playhouses and special activities for kids 12 and under. Other Village hotspots are an international food court and beer and BBQ garden, and the Sea Otter exposition area. The expo features hundreds of vendors who display new products, give out free samples, and offer terrific bargains. And in the Sea Otter Village, hundreds of professional road and mountain bike athletes are present to share their racing techniques with fans and to sign autographs.

Photo: Alex Strickland

Photo: Alex Strickland

Look for our new product reports here soon!

For more information, visit www.seaotterclassic.com or call (800) 218-8411.

 

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L’Eroica vintage ride comes to California

Carbon frames, integrated shifters, skin-tight clothing—all of these things make cycling easier, and faster, but for many folks there is a desire to celebrate a simpler, more authentic era of cycling before technology laced its inevitable fingers through our spokes.

The L’Eroica rides were founded in the Chianti region of Italy, a homeland of sorts for cycling culture. With a strict dress code and bike specification, they form a rolling time capsule along the famed Strade Bianche of roads through vineyards and orchards.

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For the first time the spirit of the original L’Eroica is coming to America. The Eroica California will be held April 11 and 12 starting in Paso Robles. There will be three route options, from 41 to 123 miles, and they are only to be undertaken with strict bicycle regulations. These include only bikes that have been constructed prior to 1987, have exposed brake housing over the handlebars, toe-clip or flat pedals, and down tube shifters.

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More than just a ride, the Eroica California includes a festival with local vendors, live music, a silent auction, a pasta meal for riders and a bicycle Concours d’Elegance.

Registration is open now. You can read more about what it’s like to ride L’Eroica in our recap of our trip to the original Italian event here.

 

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