Wyoming bikepacking: Medicine Bow National Forest

Wyo Bikepacking August-9

Sometimes, you need a full year to plan an overnight.

Last fall, my uncle William and I had succeeded in talking each other into an off-road bikepacking trip (and acquiring a bunch of cool new gear), so he went out into Wyoming’s Medicine Bow National Forest to find a route and a camping spot. I eventually had to cancel and the trip—which would be a first for each of us—was shelved.

At the end of July, we finally made it happen. We started with a shakedown ride, a bowl of my aunt’s delicious homemade chili and a sendoff from my 16-year-old cousin that consisted of an eye roll. Our two-day ride began above 10,000 feet and took us even higher over steep, chunky Jeep roads and along barely-visible singletrack before reaching Heart Lake. We pitched our tents in a field of wildflowers and proceeded to catch up on about 10 years of not seeing each other very much.

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Just one night? One has to start somewhere and one night is absolutely worthwhile. Philosopher Alain de Botton explained in his book “The Art of Travel” that appreciating and holding onto small experiences with nature was an ideal of poet William Wordsworth. Even though two or three days vacation can’t solve all of your problems, they can reside in your mind as a comfort.

The poet celebrated what he called “spots of time.” Those are, essentially, scenes that may have seemed minor in the moment but that nonetheless stick with us, and that we return to in our memories for contentment when everyday life feels crushing. Daffodils moving in the wind; the smell of a stand of pine trees—anything is up for grabs.

There are in our existence spots of time,
That with distinct pre-eminence retain
A renovating virtue…
That penetrates, enables us to mount,
When high, more high, and lifts us up when fallen.

— William Wordsworth, re-printed in de Botton’s “The Art of Travel”

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Wyo Bikepacking August-10

That, to me, is the value of these experiences. Sure, they are fun to share on Instagram, but in thinking back to my first backpacking trip 20 years ago as a comparison, I realize how many times I have called upon that memory and savored it fondly. That is what I know I will do with this trip, and likely every one after, even those that inevitably don’t go well.

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That is the excellence of bicycles: they give us spots of time. Even if you simply ride a couple of miles to work and back every day, it’s a unique moment in your 9-to-5 or equivalent. Even if it’s just a one-night bikepacking outing, it’s a unique break in the regular routine of life.

I read recently (in relation cycling) that, essentially, the only rides worth remembering are the really difficult ones. Nah. Suffering certainly tightens memory’s grip, but so do beauty, camaraderie, relaxation, novelty. And fun. If you spend two days riding a bike with a giant grin plastered irremovably on your face, that ride is probably going to get filed away in a safe, accessible place.

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I may not precisely recall every stream crossing, or how beautiful our tents looked set up in a field of flowers as the light of the sinking sun illuminated them in pinks and oranges, or how silly giddy my uncle and I both were when I busted out a SPAM single in the morning to fry up and share and we launched into a 30-minute conversation about different types of camp stoves and their merits, or how that kid backpacking with his mom brought a soccer ball and we could hear him kicking it in the distance as we rode away from camp.

I may not remember each of those things individually but, collectively, they will engrain themselves as a new spot of time in my memory, hopefully one that I get to hold onto. And, nothing could have motivated me more to go bikepacking than actually going bikepacking. When is my next trip? When and where can I go for two or three nights? How quickly can I start working my way up to an adventure that is classically “epic?” I knew from the first few pedal strokes that this Wyoming trip was just a beginning.

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Wyo Bikepacking August-2

The outing had the enhanced glow of nostalgia because it took me back to the same mountain range where, at age 10, I followed the same Uncle William and my parents into the woods for my first backpacking trip. Twenty years on, it seems that neither one of us has fundamentally changed all that much, which was somewhat of an unexpected relief. There’s an indescribable comfort at being able to slip into familiarity with a kindred spirit, especially in the process of exploring a shared passion.

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Wyo Bikepacking August-8

This isn’t where I tell you that you need to go out and do something like I did or that it was a big deal or that it wasn’t a big deal. There’s more than enough finger-wagging in the outdoor media about how you’re not doing it right but someone else is. We meticulously planned a one-night trip and only rode a handful of miles each way. Our way is certainly one way to do it. There are many others.

Define your love of cycling and the outdoors in whatever way you damn well please. That’s something I learned from Uncle William and have always admired. I appreciate that he doesn’t chase trends or exclusive toys. Besides, as he puts it, “if you want only expensive bikes, then you can’t have very many of them.”

So, I suppose I am going to tell you what to do, and that is this: Do what you want.

The Bike

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You can’t talk about bikepacking without talking about the bike. My Surly Pugsley has been a faithful friend now for the last three years and has broadened its usefulness from winter snow machine to adept touring rig.

Following my shakedown trip in Moab, I shod its stock 50-mm rims with 26×2.75 Surly Dirt Wizard tires, swapped in a Jones H-Bar up front and a Brooks Cambium saddle out back and called it good. I don’t yet know how the 100 mm bottom bracket width will affect my knees on longer journeys, but that width offers the benefit of preventing my legs from rubbing a stuffed frame bag.

I was extremely grateful for the stability, cushion and grip of extra-knobby, plus-ish tires paired to the great ride of a steel frame. The new crop of up-and-coming bikes designed around plus tires might seem like just a fad or a phase, but I don’t think I’ll ever do loaded, off-road touring on anything else. I’m sold. Now that some bike companies are turning to 26plus tires for smaller-frame and women’s-specific mountain bikes, I might have more tire options in the future.

The Gear

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Backpack: Water bladder, sleeping bag, rain cover for pack, ultralight wind vest, arm and leg warmers (the only items I did not use), wallet, phone, keys to my truck

Apidura seat pack: alcohol fuel stove and small fuel bottle, small cook pot, collapsible bowl that doubles as a tiny cutting board, titanium fork and spoon, waterproof matches, insulated mug, insulated vest, insulated jacket, rain jacket, small pack towel, spare clothing (socks, underwear, wool hat, warm gloves, baselayer tights, long-sleeve shirt) and camp shoes attached to the outside (Crocs clogs)

  • TIP: Make sure you don’t strap so much on the top of the seat pack that you can’t get your rear back off the saddle on steep, loose descents.

Revelate Designs frame bag: toiletries (toothbrush, toothpaste, glasses, contact lens solution/case, wet wipes); breakfast (SPAM single, oatmeal, almond butter, instant coffee); dinner (freeze-dried backpacking meal); small bottle of cooking oil; bike-specific toolkit; spare tube; tire pump; ultralight one-person backpacking first aid kit; headlamp; camp knife; small roll of biodegradable toilet paper; pocket-sized sketchbook with pencil

Revelate Designs handlebar bag: one-person tent, ground cloth, tent poles/stakes, sleeping pad, camp pillow (the only thing I’d leave at home next time)

Fork-mounted dry bags (made by Salsa): Left: lunch/snacks (bagel, dried sausage, marinated green olives, dark chocolate-covered raisins, small container of peanut butter, Clif Bar energy food pouch-sweet potato flavor); Right: 1-liter water bottle, SteriPen for water purification

Revelate Designs stem bag: compact-ish camera (Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100), lip balm, DEET bug juice, sunscreen

Did I forget anything? Yep: a small flask of bourbon and an evening hot drink such as cocoa or decaf tea. Luckily for us both, my uncle brought fire starters (cotton balls rubbed with petroleum jelly) since everything around us was wet. A small folding saw would have been welcome for firewood gathering and trail clearing, but not necessary.

 

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Feature: Ready for Anything

Illustrations: Chris Conlin
Originally published in Issue #41

What to do if you break a spoke

Screen Shot 2016-07-28 at 6.00.15 PMIt depends on the ride. It’s all about being prepared. Ideally you’ll have a really tiny spoke wrench in your bag and you can loosen two nipples/spokes on opposite sides of the broken spoke. How do you know you’re loosening the nipple? Hold your hand on the spoke and either feel it increase or decrease in tension.

Wrap the broken spoke around a neighboring spoke if you can’t pull it out. If you have rim brakes, make sure your wheel can fit through the brake pads (since it is now out of true). Not all wheels can handle a broken spoke, however. Lower spoke count wheels (24 spokes and below) are a lot harder to fix in the field and require a phone call to someone. Additionally, proprietary wheels like paired spoke wheels and some proprietary spokes can’t be adjusted as easily.

If you’re touring, it helps if you have a few spare spokes and a little heartier of a truing wrench. If it’s a drive side spoke you’ll also need a cassette removal tool like the Stein mini lockring tool. Once the cassette is off you can replace the spoke bringing it as close to tension as you can.

— Jude Gerace, owner/founder of Sugar Wheel Works

What to do if you bonk

Screen Shot 2016-07-28 at 6.00.58 PMThere are two goals I try to achieve when that sudden onset of energy-drain hits you like a ton of bricks. The first is to minimize the length and extremity of my ride as quickly as possible. The second is to take note of how you feel and more importantly how you recently felt so that you can be more aware of the signs that a “bonk” is coming. This is valuable because a “bonk” doesn’t actually hit you like that ton of bricks out of nowhere. There are signs, if you are listening well enough.

Priority number one is to get essential fuels back into the system to “unbonk.” Ideally you need simple sugars that are quickly metabolized. How you react to the initial onset will relate to how much you’ll need to consume. Normally one or two packages of energy chews is a solid option to get you back in the game.

However, it takes a while to recover from bonking. Once you’ve consumed essential carbs, it’s a waiting and survival game. This could take 5 to 30 minutes (if it works at all). Take extra care to observe how you feel during this whole process and try to recall the minute feelings you had just before you bonked. These “tells” are invaluable to learn for the future. Learning these tells well help you to avoid bonking entirely.

For me, I’ve come to learn that I typically feel a slight euphoria before I bonk. Shortly afterwards I start to feel my arms growing in weight. This is the tipping point for me and a moment when I can save face if timing, energy and strategy is employed tactfully. So get to know yourself when you bonk.

You will always run the risk of bonking, no matter how prepared and knowledgeable you are. So while you want to avoid bonking, when it happens, treat it as a learning experience, an invaluable one.

— Shawn Milne, former professional cyclist and current marketing specialist at Skratch Labs

What to do if you come across an injured person

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The obvious first thing to do when you come up on an injured cyclist is to make sure the scene is safe. Ideally you are not moving an injured person unless you can do this without causing further harm. However, you might need to move someone out of harm’s way or protect them by signaling or warning oncoming traffic.

Then there is a standard basic life support sequence we use to check for threats to life. It’s an “ABC” approach familiar to people who have taken CPR or basic first aid courses. We check the “A” or airway and make sure air can move in and out of the lungs. There may be a need to clear the mouth of blood, vomit, broken teeth, or to position the patient on their side so they can breathe.

Next we check for “B”, breathing, and hopefully don’t need to perform mouth-to-mouth or mouth-to-mask breathing. The only first aid for broken ribs, which can cause pain and shortness of breath while the injured person tries to breath, is simple reassurance and support until help arrives.

The “C” or circulation step is to check for a pulse and to begin chest compressions if there is no pulse present. It’s also importantly a check for severe bleeding and stop it. Direct pressure on the site of the bleeding with a hand or better yet a piece of fabric or an actual wound dressing will stop more bleeding.

We can add a “D” and an “E” to this sequence as well. “D” is the assumption of a spine injury and protection of the spine by avoiding unneeded movement until help arrives. “E” reminds us to look at things that are bent, broken or out of place to find serious injuries and also reminds us to think about the environment. The cyclist who was warm in the saddle may quickly become cold on the pavement.

Ideally you now hear the wail of the siren signaling that help is on the way.

— Tod Schimelpfenig, curriculum director, NOLS Wilderness Medicine Institute

How to avoid dangerous weather

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Thunderstorms pose the biggest problems for cyclists in regards to dangerous weather. Thunderstorms occur during the times when most cyclists are most likely outside riding during the warm months. They can suddenly sneak up on you with little warning and produce a multitude of dangerous weather conditions.

Lightning: If you are caught outside in a thunderstorm, you want to minimize the possibility of being hit by lightning. If road riding and you have no shelter, find a low area and lay flat away from your bike and any tall objects. If mountain biking, seek shelter away from trees. Again, find a low area and lay flat or seek shelter in boulders if out in the woods.

Hail: Large hail can do considerable damage. If you are caught in a hail storm, keep your helmet on, it’s the best protection you have. Try to find some shelter like a bridge to hide under. If you are caught with no shelter, try to cover your body as best as possible with any protection like corn stalks or hay. Even tree branches covering your body will help protect you from hail. Stay away from your bike because of the threat of lightning.

Sudden Temperature Drops: Thunderstorms, the passage of cold fronts or higher elevations can mean sudden changes in temperatures and hypothermia. Check the weather before venturing out and have a rain jacket with you. It will keep you dry and also retain heat if temperatures drop.

If temperatures drop, try to minimize your speed so you don’t create excessive windchills on your body. You bike may actually start to shake as your body shivers. Pull back on your bike speed or even stop to allow warming to occur. You can even seek any debris, hay or grass along the road or trails that you can stuff into your shirt to give you protection from the cold temperatures.

Tornadoes: Seek shelter in a sturdy building or storm shelter. If you are caught in the open when a tornado is approaching, dismount your bike and seek shelter in a ditch, storm drain pipe or underpass. Keep in mind that if it’s raining hard, ditches and storm drains can fill up with water and underpasses are not always the safest place.

If in a forest mountain biking, seek a location that is below ground level like a stream or creek, or around boulders. Trees and branches will be coming down all around you so you need to cover yourself up and protect yourself for the debris. Keep your helmet on because it will provide some protection.

— Henry Margusity, senior meteorologist with AccuWeather.com

How to get un-lost

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Every part of me wants to write a few paragraphs about good preparation as the best way to get “pre-un-lost,” but for now you’re lost. First and foremost, stop and take a deep breath. Don’t panic. Wrapping yourself around the axle only leads to bad decisions. Go back (mentally) to the last point you remember being un-lost. How far back was it? Is it short enough to ride or hike back to? Nine times out of 10 on the trip back you’ll discover your mistake and get back on track and be surprised you missed that turn.

The important takeaway here is keep it simple and stay based in solid fact. DO NOT start piling on bad decisions and end up on the cover of Bicycle Times as a tragedy story.

My second tip, and very related to the first, is to avoid groupthink. My company operates primarily self-guided tours and we get some of the craziest “we got lost” stories you’ll ever hear. So many of them are a result of groupthink: one or two guys start to create a story of where they are and what turn they took or didn’t take. We hear wild tales of “I knew the route was sorta SHAPED like this, so we veered in that SHAPE.”

Next thing you know you have 10 guys all headed in the same direction believing the story. Meanwhile, one of the guys in the back tells it later, “I knew what they were saying made no sense and I had the GPS, but I just went along with it.” Speak up and think critically of everyone’s ideas while staying respectful. You may completely disagree with another’s idea of where you are, but avoid infighting.

Finally, paper maps are light, cheap and the batteries never die. Just sayin’.

— Matt McFee, director of Hermosa Tours

What to do if you’re in an accident

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  • Call 911 for ambulance and police and wait for their arrival. If you are in no shape to do so, ask a bystander to do it.
  • Don’t refuse medical assistance and say that you are fine—you’ll be pumped full of adrenaline and may not realize you are injured.
  • Photograph any visible auto and bike damage, skid marks and accident debris.
  • Photograph the driver’s insurance card and driver’s license, and write down the name, phone number, address and auto insurance information for the driver. If the driver refuses to cooperate, notify police.
  • Don’t give any statements to the other party’s insurance company.
  • Photograph and write down the make and model of the vehicle, as well as the license plate number.
  • Don’t engage in any negotiations for compensation with the driver.
  • Get names and contact information for all witnesses to the accident.
  • Hire an attorney who has experience handling bicycle accident cases.
  • Resist the urge to post details of the accident online. It will be scrutinized by the driver’s insurance company.
  • Have a reputable bike shop document the damage to your bike. Also document damage to any other property involved, such as clothing, accessories, backpacks, etc.

— Marc S. Reisman, Esq.

10 more vital tips

Richard Belson, an instructor at the United Bicycle Institute, offered up some extra tips for cyclists. Find them here.

 

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First Impression: Marin Four Corners

Marin GAP Tour (10 of 41)

Photos: Emily Walley

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Marin designed the Four Corners and Four Corners Elite for the daily commute and the weekend adventure, and it couldn’t be more on point. I’m testing the lower priced model, with an MSRP of $1100. It offers all the bells and whistles for fully-loaded touring in an affordable package. The Four Corners is an all-steel frame with mounts for a front and rear rack, fenders and three bottle cages.

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Saddling up, I immediately noticed the upright riding position facilitated by the long headtube. The bars sit higher than what I’m used to and have a 20-degree flare to the drop. On other bikes, I’ve trended toward riding primarily on the hoods and tops, but the Marin’s upright position had me comfortably riding in the drops for long stretches of rolling hills and rail trails—a welcome change. The reach on the size small frame was a little long for me, so I put on a 20 mm shorter stem.

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To get a sense of the bike’s touring capabilities, I added fenders and a front rack and loaded it down with gear for a mixed-surface tour from Cumberland, Maryland, to Pittsburgh. The ride included crushed limestone rail trail, rolling hard roads, dirt roads and railroad ballast. I carried my weight low on the front rack and the bike handled very well while weighted down.

Marin GAP Tour (10 of 41)

On the small-sized frame, I was unable to include a water bottle underneath the downtube because it hit the fender. Though I haven’t tried yet, I’m speculating that the tire will come very close to hitting even a short bottle without fenders. On my trip, I used a stem-mounted cage for a third bottle.

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The other two bottle mounts are placed so they’re easy to reach for day-to-day use, but they’re not in an ideal location for a frame bag. I zip-tied a cage lower on the downtube, closing up the unused space and allowing room for my frame bag.

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I found the stock Schwalbe Silento 700c x 40 mm tires to be an appropriate spec, rolling well in a variety of terrain and adequately burly, so I wasn’t overly concerned with getting a flat. The Four Corners has clearance for up 45 mm tires with fenders or 29 x 2.1 knobby tires without fenders.

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The Shimano Alivio 9-Speed with 12-36T gearing was adequate while weighted down over Pennsylvania’s rolling hills, but I’d go with a lower gear range for an extended, fully-loaded tour with sustained climbs.

Marin GAP Tour (32 of 41)

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I was thrilled with the stock WTB Volt Sport saddle. One of the biggest pains of rail trail riding are the long, flat sections of saddle time. The WTB is comfortable and supportive and I didn’t find myself sitting gingerly.

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Look for the full review in an upcoming issue of Bicycle Times. Not subscribed? Sign up today for our email newsletter so you don’t miss stories like this one. Or, subscribe to the print magazine, where you can find the full review of this bike.

 

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Globetrotting: Finding your groove

By Beth Puliti

Whether you’re headed out on a world tour or a weekend adventure, I have four words for you: be open to change.

Until you begin the physical act of pedaling your bicycle, any grand plans that you have made in your head are subject to change at any time for any reason. This is especially true when it comes to how far you expect to travel on a daily basis.

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Before embarking on this open-ended bike tour, I planned my route based on how far I anticipated pedaling each day and how often I thought I should take a rest day. With these averages, I was able to loosely figure out where on the map I’d be at certain points in the year. Advantageous, sure, but not entirely accurate.

When I hit the pavement, myriad factors came into play each and every day that influenced and sometimes even changed my best-laid plans. Factors that hadn’t crossed my mind while sitting in front of the wood stove pouring over maps and journals of those who had gone before my husband and I. These factors became immediately apparent once on the road.

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Factors like long stretches of rain in northern Italy and unending sections of flat highway in the central part of the country. Both had us hammering out way more miles than we had anticipated simply because the scenery around us either wasn’t interesting (or didn’t look so through the rain), and so we just kept plugging along without taking the time to stop. We arrived in Rome far earlier than planned, which allowed us to build in a visit with my relatives, something that wasn’t in our original plans, but turned out to be a personal highlight of the tour.

On the other hand, mechanicals, Mother Nature and ill-marked roads have slowed our pedaling too many times to count. In Thailand, a handful of flat tires sidelined us for much of the afternoon. In Turkey, a brutal headwind encountered during the first few days of entering the country nearly brought our progress to a stop. And in Italy, a wrong turn got us lost on unmarked roads in a national forest for hours. In all of these cases, we covered far shorter ground than expected that day.

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Being open to change allows you to take wrong turns, broken bike parts and bad weather in stride so you can focus on things other than your daily mileage count—like the friendly people you’re probably meeting, the incredible food you’re probably eating and the new places you’re probably seeing. These are the reasons you decided to travel by bike anyway, right?

OK, so you’re not going to wreck yourself over a silly little thing like daily distances. What about other preconceived plans you made? Perhaps you decided you would exclusively camp on your tour, but after a few nights in a tent you realize you don’t really like it. Fellow bike tourers, it’s OK to change the plan to what you feel comfortable doing.

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Time on the road makes you realize that many of the best experiences will occur on the days when things don’t go entirely as expected. More miles, fewer miles, sleeping under the stars or under a roof—at the end of the day, it doesn’t matter. What matters is finding a groove that works for you. One that’s not too fast, nor too slow to enjoy the world from behind your handlebars.


Follow Beth Puliti on Instagram and read her other thoughts on bike touring for Bicycle Times.

 

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Ask Beardo: Panniers

Q: Beardo,

I’ve been trying to figure out where to mount my panniers. Front or rear, low or high, a mixture of both? I see all kinds of systems being used for touring, bikepacking and whatever else, but I can’t find a definitive guide to where and why.

Thanks,
Felix Trentostropher
Randellburgh, Utah

Beardo Panniers

Felix,

Why is it we need to be sure of anything or everything? Is your bike going to spontaneously combust and eject you into a tar pit if your bags aren’t placed exactly to the whims of the latest Internet adventure stud/Peter Pan/Instagram hero? No it won’t.

You have all the evidence you need to decide on this. Thousands of dudes (both male and female) that dressed and groomed like it was the ‘70s, because it was ‘70s, crossed the U.S. with heavy military surplus gear stuffed into rear panniers and a handlebar bag. Is this an ideal system? Probably not. Does it work. Hell yes! There is tall-tubesock and running shorts bedecked evidence everywhere you look.

Look, if you load up a bike, it will change the handling, no matter where you mount your bags. Maybe your bike has the proper combo of bar height, fork offset, frame stiffness and head tube angle (and any number of X-factors no one can quite figure out) to make it ride like a dream with low-mount panniers. The problem is, you won’t know unless you try.

And most people load up their stuff the way that seems the most practical/affordable/cool-looking and over the course of a tour become so attuned to the vagaries of the bike that a Zen-like calm replaces the worry that bags mounted someplace else may be the final key to cycling nirvana.

It is much more important to keep your kit clean, dry and secure. Make sure your bags are attached to your rack well enough to bomb down that rocky two-track to that hidden swimming hole.

Buckle your buckles, tighten your straps, keep heavy stuff low, your camera close at hand and your cell phone buried deep under that big bag of gorp. The rest will take care of itself.


This Q&A originally appeared in Bicycle Times Issue #37. Support your favorite independent cycling magazine and order a subscription today. Beardo is counting on you.

 

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Allegheny National Forest touring tandemonium

From Issue #37
Words and Photos by Emily Walley and Justin Steiner

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The thought of committing to a four-day, three-night touring adventure aboard the Salsa Powderkeg with almost zero tandem experience was a little bit intimidating. Would we be able to comfortably carry all of our gear? How would we manage some of the rougher dirt roads and trails we planned to traverse in Pennsylvania’s Allegheny National Forest?

Despite these reservations, our excitement to share this new experience was thrilling, and we quickly got to work acclimating to life aboard a bicycle built for two. Not long into the first road ride, our confidence swelled as it became apparent we were aboard a very competent and capable rig. But, we also realized that we needed to recalibrate our approach slightly. As independent cyclists we’ve grown accustomed to making forceful and sometimes aggressive maneuvers on the bike. Those inputs don’t jive well in tandem land. Subtle inputs and smooth transitions are the name of the game.

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With one road ride under our belt, we jumped to the next logical step: mountain biking. On the Powderkeg, our standard weekly Thursday ride became a whole new adventure and a barrel of fun. Dropping into the first trail was a little rough as trail features we haven’t thought about in years suddenly tested our capability. We were both tense and our inputs were fighting each other. It’s amazing how much influence the stoker has on the bike, despite the lack of ability to steer. The stoker’s wide bar provided a lot of leverage. We occasionally found it helpful for Emily to move her hands to the center of the bars, minimizing her upper body input. Riding as a stoker requires a lot of leg input and a very relaxed upper body.

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Not long after we ran poor Emily into the first tree, forcing us to jointly dismount, we began to relax and started into a rhythm together. Amazingly, that first near-crash (and the many that followed) made us realize abrupt dismounts were totally manageable, as was dabbing a foot when necessary to right the ship. We found it helpful for the stoker to remain on the bike and let the captain dab whenever possible. This way Emily could help propel the bike forward on an ascent or technical terrain while Justin resumed his position. From that point on, we were golden, at least once the captain came to terms with just how wide he had to turn so as to not run his stoker into any more trees.

Throughout that first mountain bike ride, we continued to be amazed by the capability of the Powderkeg. With such a long wheelbase the stability is incredible. As long as we kept the pedals turning, we could crank, albeit slowly, up just about anything. We knew we were ready to tackle some reasonably rough and tumble terrain, so long as it didn’t involve a lot of big rocks and logs as it’s awfully easy to high-center.Tandem Tour Salsa-3

A Blessing and a Curse

With our confidence high and our communication dialed, we began planning and packing for our tour of a portion of the more than 500,000-acre Allegheny National Forest (ANF). Like most of our National Forests, the ANF is a “working forest,” meaning managed natural gas and oil extraction as well as selective timber harvests provide operational revenue and economic impact within the local community.

While the harvesting of natural resources may be a point of contention now, this forest’s history is far uglier than today’s sustainability managed approach. By the early 1900’s, nearly all of this land, and most all of Pennsylvania for that matter, was clear cut by private companies trying to meet burgeoning demand for lumber for everything from construction to wood pulp for paper to wood chemical production—acetic acid, wood alcohol and acetate of lime. During the Civil War, tanneries used immense amounts of hemlock bark to keep up with leather production.

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After the trees were gone, the land was abandoned. In 1923, the Federal Government purchased this land and established the ANF, as authorized by the Weeks Act of 1911. At the time, locals called this shrub-filled wasteland the “Allegheny Brush-patch.”

Unfortunately, when the Federal Government purchased the ANF, funding limitations lead to purchasing only the surface rights. Ninety-three percent of the ANF’s subsurface rights are privately held, which has led to extensive oil and natural gas extraction. In 1981, this region produced roughly 17 percent of Pennsylvania’s total crude oil output.

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While there are many undeniable downsides to these industries, one of the upsides comes in the form of forest roads. After decades of drilling and logging, forest roads criss-cross a majority of the forest. Some are open to vehicular traffic, others have long since been closed to motor vehicles. Some barely even exist.

So long as you’re away from extraction traffic, these roads are perfect for touring. You’re off the beaten path, but the terrain is mellow enough that you’re able to comfortably cover ground on a loaded touring bike. But, it’s also just technical enough to keep things interesting. For the most part, forest roads tend to be well signed, so they’re easily navigable. For this trip, the ANF’s administrative map proved to be the right tool for for planning and navigating. These administrative maps show all of the forest roads, whether they’re gated or open to the public. Online maps and gazetteers can’t always be trusted when it comes to showing which roads are navigable and which aren’t.

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After spending way too many hours staring at maps drawing and redrawing routes, we settled on three beautiful, remote locations to camp and connected the dots with as much dirt and as little hike-a-bike as possible.

Packing turned out to be easier than feared. With racks and panniers at both ends, a frame bag up front, one Salsa Anything Cage and Anything Bag, six water bottles and a snack bag, we were set. (Visit bicycletimesmag.com/tandem_anf to see detailed setup info.) Here, the Powderkeg again impressed us with its versatility and plethora of options for mounting and hauling gear.

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On the Road

Day one consisted of a long, long climb from the reservoir’s edge up a drainage to the top of the plateau, rolling ridgetop pavement, and a steep descent back to the water’s edge to a boat-in-only campsite. Toward the end of the day, we experienced the first of many mini-frustrations. Know how you tend to get fidgety toward the end of a long day in the saddle? Well, that mutual fidgeting and fatigue isn’t the best for morale when every little wiggle and wobble is transmitted to your partner in crime.

After a fitful night’s sleep trying to keep a portly raccoon out of our food stash—Blackburn’s awesome Outpost Top Tube bag may be water resistant, but it’s not coon-proof—we made a fatigued pushed up out of the valley.

In the late afternoon, we rolled into a beautiful, secluded campsite upstream from a fish hatchery. Water rumbling over a small dam provided the perfect soundtrack for a good night’s sleep.

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Day three took us to Heart’s Content Scenic Area, one of approximately 20 stands of old-growth forest remaining in all of Pennsylvania. Walking through this forest, it’s hard to believe the entire state was once covered by these giants. Shame of it is, many of these trees are nearing the end of their lifecycle. Each year a few more fall down.

The highlight of this day was bombing five miles down hill on an old timber-era, narrow-gauge rail corridor. All loaded down and traveling on this sometimes-rough surface, the Powderkeg rolled with a confidence that encouraged more speed, despite the rain. This and many other downhills made me thankful for the large disc brake rotors. Even with those big rotors, we often smelled hot brakes on descents.

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After a big day in the saddle and one lengthy, uphill, bushwhacking hike-a-bike, our last night camping was by far the most spectacular, right at the base of an underappreciated and positively gorgeous waterfall. We hustled to beat the rain into camp, which hammered down just moments after we finalized our tarp setup. Thanks to the day’s rain, it only took a dozen attempts to get a decent fire going. With nearly a month of rain prior to our trip, the falls were running ample and loudly, making for another good night’s sleep.

After a short trip back to the car on day four, we were happy to be easing back into civilization. It’s funny how being mostly remote for not even four full days provides a whole different perspective on your day-to-day existence.

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In all, this trip was everything we had hoped it would be. We had a blast sharing a local adventure, but more importantly, touring on a tandem undoubtedly made us both more connected, conscientious, considerate partners.

Continue reading with our full field review of the Salsa Powderkeg.


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Review: Salsa Powderkeg Tandem

From Issue #37
Testers: Justin Steiner and Emily Walley

To see action photos and learn more about this bike, check out the multi-day bikepacking adventure that begat this review by reading “Allegheny National Forest touring tandemonium” from the same issue.

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Salsa first began prototyping tandems back in 2010 when former Salsa Engineer Tim Krueger and his wife Odia saw other couples racing the Chequamegon Fat Tire Festival’s Short and Fat Race on tandems. Now, many prototype miles later, including a trip down the Tour Divide,the production Powderkeg is here.

While the Powderkeg is inspired by Salsa’s El Mariachi 29er mountain bike, the construction is much burlier. Salsa utilizes downright huge Cobra Kai tubes custom drawn for this project on the frame and fork to minimize flex. Despite the heavy-duty construction, the complete bike weighs just 42 pounds.

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Three frame sizes are available; medium/small, large/small and large/medium. According to Salsa, those offerings will fit captains from five feet, eight inches to six feet, three inches. Stokers from five feet, five inches to six feet even. It’s worth noting we’re both one inch shorter than the minimum stated fit range but had no issues fitting on the bike. Emily ran the standard stoker stem and Justin swapped to a 60 mm stem.

Salsa bills the Powderkeg as a mountain, gravel and touring bike. Big brakes and aggressive knobby tires hold up the mountain bike end of the bargain so long as you’re willing. On the touring side, a plethora of rack, water bottle and three-pack mounts provide ample options for hauling stuff and mounting fenders. Salsa’s Alternator rear dropout system works incredibly well with the company’s Alternator Rack, but doesn’t play as nicely with other racks.

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The rest of the Powderkeg’s spec is well thought out and reliable without being overly pricey. The Shimano SLX 3×10 drivetrain worked flawlessly and provided all the gearing range we needed. Avid BB7 cable-actuated brakes with 200 mm rotors provided ample stopping power and resisted fading throughout our testing.

It’s clear Salsa invested and lot of time and energy in this project and their hard work has paid off. The Powderkeg is a cohesive, rough and ready package. I’m so impressed with the ride quality and stiffness of this frame. Fully loaded for camping or on technical singletrack we never perceived a bit of fork or frame flex, which is incredible considering the length of the bike and the force two people can apply.

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The Powderkeg’s handling is similarly impressive. Of course, riding a tandem requires some adjustment, this bike’s 70-degree headtube angle and long wheelbase blend low-speed maneuverability and high-speed stability very well, regardless of whether bombing singletrack or cruising dirt roads. At tandem-friendly-speeds off road, I never felt much need for a suspension fork, but a 100 mm tandem-rated suspension fork may be used. Unlike a single bike, each person is only really dealing with the impacts from one wheel. The other wheel is so far away the bump forces are much smaller.

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The Powderkeg is one of just a few off-the-shelf mountain tandems available. Cannondale offers the Tandem 29er for $3,125 with some compelling component spec, but it doesn’t offer comparable touring versatility and has a strangely steep 72.5-degree headtube angle.

Aside from that, nearly every other tandem in this category hails from a smaller company and commands a premium. For instance, Co-Motion’s Java 29er starts at $5,595. Ventana offers a handful of tandems; the full suspension El Conquistador de Montañas 29er starts at $6,000 and the rigid, fat-wheel El Gran Jefe ranges from $3,200 to $6,500. All of these make the adventure-ready Powderkeg seem like a pretty good deal at $3,999.

More info from Salsa Cycles


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Review: Trek 920 Disc

From Issue #37

Bicycle touring has changed a lot over the past few years, and while riders once rejoiced for a smooth ribbon of asphalt, a rough and rocky road is now de rigueur. Right on the Trek website you see signs of this preference as the new 920 Disc is classified under the banner of “touring and adventure,” and it’s clearly been designed to peg the needle at the latter end of that dial.

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I have to say, the matte green paint and knobby tires look pretty badass, like something you’d expect to see with CALL OF DUTY EDITION stenciled on the side. Besides its looks the main draw of the 920 is of course the wheels and tires, which are straight out of the Bontrager mountain bike catalog: duster elite tubeless ready 29-inch wheels with thru-axles front and rear and XR1 29×2.0 tires. There is ample clearance for a 29×2.2 or a set of fenders with the stock tires.

When not exploring the back roads of the Wild West, the 920 Disc would make an excellent commuter. The build powering those big wheels is a Sram 10-speed drivetrain with 42/28 chainrings and an 11-36 cassette, also borrowed from a mountain bike. Old-school bike tourists will appreciate the bar-end shifters, though I wish the modern SRAM versions could be switched to friction mode. The double chainrings are more than adequate for most riding, but don’t offer a huge range. This might be the first bike I’ve ridden where I was wishing for a little bit lower gear and a higher gear; usually it’s just one or the other.

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Built from Trek’s 100 Series Alpha Aluminum, the frame’s tubing is aggressively shaped with a massive downtube and a distinctly kinked top tube. That kink makes room for a second bottle cage on the top of the down tube on frames size 56 and up, for a total of four on the main triangle. There are also bottle cage mounts on each fork leg that do double duty as the front rack mount. In fact, the 920 Disc includes both front and rear Bontrager aluminum racks. While the rear rack is a fairly conventional design, the front rack sits up a bit higher than a set of traditional low-riders, though with the panniers mounted on the second bar from the top the bike handles just fine with plenty of toe clearance.

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Bringing it all to a halt is a pair of TRP’s Hylex hydraulic disc brakes, which stand out for their stopping power but are also distinctive for their ergonomics. The main body of the lever houses the master cylinder, and to make room they are quite long. So much so that if you swapped these onto another bike, you’d have to shorten the stem by 10 mm or so to compensate to achieve the same reach to the hoods. The compact bend of the handlebar keeps things pretty comfortable though. I also swapped out the stock stem for a shorter one to dial in a perfect fit.

I loaded the 920 up with panniers and hit the pavement for a 100-mile overnight road ride, and then ditched the racks for some forest road exploring. It’s perhaps a bit too heavy for all-out gravel racing, but I found it’s an excellent companion for all-day back road explorations and dirt road rambling. Despite the aluminum frame, the big tires are more than enough to soak up the road vibrations, and the Bontrager saddle and I got along just fine.

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While the basic layout of the 920 Disc is fairly traditional, the details are anything but. Shift cables run internally and the frame is equipped with a port for the Trek DuoTrap S speed and cadence sensor system. The hydraulic brakes might scare off some traditionalists, but they are much appreciated when you’re careening down a mountain with 70 pounds of gear. Purists will also scoff at the notion of an aluminum frame and fork on a touring bike, but if you really think you need a frame that can somehow be pieced back together on the side of the road by a good samaritan with a blowtorch in Uzbekistan, so be it. But I doubt you do.

The other refrain I’ve seen echoing through the message boards is that Trek copied the Salsa Fargo, as if that were the first bike with 29-inch tires and drop bars. While the Salsa is at heart a mountain bike and can run a suspension fork, the 920 Disc isn’t meant for singletrack. Think of it more as a Subaru Outback than a Jeep Wrangler.

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The stock tires are most at home on double-track or gravel, but they roll well enough that I left them on for road rides as well. Because they are tubeless ready the bead sits incredibly tight on the rim and fixing a flat requires very high air pressure, some strong thumbs and a bit of cursing to get the tires to seat properly. I recommend setting them up tubeless from the beginning to shed weight and eliminate pinch flats.

While the 920 is meant for more rough and tumble adventures rather than smooth pavement, I would still choose it over the classic Trek 520 model for traditional road touring. My mountain bike experience has made me a big fan of hydraulic disc brakes and thru-axles—modern features that have earned my trust. Whether you go slicks or knobbies, with racks or without, the 920 Disc is a versatile bike that is ready for your next adventure.

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Details

  • Price: $2,090
  • Weight: 24.8 pounds (without racks), 27.5 pounds (with racks)
  • Sizes: 49, 52, 54, 56, 58 (tested) and 61 cm
  • More: trekbikes.com

 

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Adventure Cycling to host National Bike Travel Weekend

Adventure Cycling Association invites people of all ages and abilities to join National Bike Travel Weekend: the largest-ever weekend of bicycle travel across America and Canada—June 3-5, 2016—by registering an overnight bike trip or joining an existing one.

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“Our goal is to inspire new and experienced bike travelers alike to enjoy an overnight bicycle trip with thousands of other people throughout North America on the same weekend,” says Jim Sayer, executive director of Adventure Cycling Association. “National Bike Travel Weekend is for big groups, small groups and solo bike enthusiasts. It can be one night or two nights, travelers can sleep outside or indoors, and the distance covered can be one to 100 miles — whatever works for you.”

Everyone who registers a National Bike Travel Weekend trip by May 16 will be entered into a drawing to win a commemorative Salsa Marrakesh touring bicycle. The official National Bike Travel Weekend hashtag is #biketravelweekend.

Participants can connect with over 150 National Bike Travel Weekend ambassadors with questions about going on a bike overnight. These ambassadors, located all over North America, are eager to share their local and regional knowledge of bike-friendly routes and overnight accommodations.

The inaugural National Bike Travel Weekend is being launched as part of Adventure Cycling’s 40th anniversary celebration in 2016. Adventure Cycling was founded as Bikecentennial and started as a 4,250-mile TransAmerica Trail bicycle ride with over 4,100 participants in the summer of 1976.

 

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Swift Industries launches new Hinterland Collection

The hinterlands are the area just beyond your reach. Past the horizon. Around the next bend.

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Those are the places Swift Industries hopes you’ll explore with its new line of bags and accessories. All of Swift Industries’ bags are made by hand in its Seattle workshop, and the new Hinterland Collection switches out the traditional Cordura construction in favor of the lighter and more water-resistant XPac material.

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The centerpiece is the updated Ozette randonneuring bag that is available in three sizes, each of which mounts to a rando-style front rack. They feature a flared flap for water protection, a new closure system that offers better durability and versatility, and an internal organization system to keep your items close at hand. The small carries 10.5 liters, the medium 12.5 liters and the large 15.5 liters. It is only available in black XPac with orange accents. Prices range from $230 to $260.

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Matching the Ozette is a pair of Hinterland Jr. Ranger Panniers, also made from XPac and perfect for carrying on front lowrider racks. They carry 20 liters per pair and use a traditional bungee hook attachment system for universal fit and durability. In addition to the external pockets, the dual-closure main body is lined with waterproof textile to ensure it is extremely weather resistant. They retail for $260 a pair.

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Also new is the Roanoke Backpack Pannier, a modular backpack that attaches to your bike via traditional hook-and-strap pannier hardware. The two adjustable straps are made from seatbelt webbing for comfort and clip on and off to stow in the front pocket. Still made from Cordura for a classic look, it is available in either a Mini or Roll Top version, and the backpack conversion can be added to custom pannier bags, as well. The Roll Top measures 23 liters and the Mini Roll Top is 15 liters. The Roll Top sells for $205 and the Mini Roll Top for $180.

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The Hinterland Collection, the Roanoke backpack panniers and all of Swift Industries’ classic bags are available now at Swift Industries’ redesigned website.

Keep reading

Read our review of the classic Jr. Ranger Panniers.

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Globetrotting: How can you afford it?

By Beth Puliti
Published in Issue #31

It’s a bit surreal to finally be turning the pedals on foreign soil after so much planning went into freeing myself from life at home. I’m not going to sugar coat things: Taking the initial steps to begin a long-term bike tour was intimidating and laborious. It would have been so much easier to hire a travel agent, purchase a vacation package, escape for two weeks and return home. Albeit, financially and emotionally drained.

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But I don’t do easy. I can’t afford easy. And I don’t have the desire to “escape” life (despite what the travel industry and my nurse at the travel clinic say). I want to live it, fully and on my terms. It’s the belief that life doesn’t have to only consist of the familiar routine we frequently find ourselves living, unless we want it to. I believe we have the ability to figure out what it is we want in life and more or less create our own reality.

Therefore, it is while living my life—not running from it—that I began this long-term, two-wheeled journey. And it was when telling my friends and family of my plans that I heard time and again, “How can you afford it?” It’s a valid question. And it has a simple, two-part answer: priority and sacrifice. I’ll attempt to explain in more detail.

When something becomes a priority, we take steps to make it happen. Many people find a way to finance a brand new car, designer clothing or dining out, usually by saving and/or sacrificing in areas deemed less important. In the same way, when travel becomes a priority, my husband and I take similar steps. We live a simple life and are frugal with our humble savings. When we decided to place a higher value on travel, we didn’t have to change our lifestyle drastically.

That isn’t to say we don’t make sacrifices. The following is a list of things we did, or were already doing, that afforded us the freedom to travel. I understand everyone’s situation is different. This is simply what worked for us, and perhaps it might serve as a starting point of sorts for those looking for some guidance.

  1. We don’t have a smartphone payment. I don’t have one and my husband’s is paid for by his employer.
  2. We don’t have a cable bill, or a television, for that matter.
  3. We rarely go out to eat.
  4. We owned one older car that was paid off. Several days before we left the country, we sold it on Craigslist to add a bit of extra cash to our savings and eliminate our insurance payment.
  5. We put our house up for rent.
  6. We sold expensive items we wouldn’t have a need for on the road, such as rarely-used camera lenses and hardly-ridden bikes.

However, being able to afford long-term travel extends beyond the planning stages. We’re just as conscious of our spending when we’re pedaling, too. Here’s what we do on the road to afford frequent travel.

  1. We buy and cook most of our own food.
  2. We almost always use human-powered transportation.
  3. We sign up for credit cards that offer bonus miles and use the frequent flier miles we’ve accrued from business travel.
  4. We “wild camp” or seek out Warm Showers hosts. (Have you heard of Warm Showers? It’s a community of touring cyclists around the world who open up their homes to other touring cyclists. We’ve been hosted by some truly wonderful people on our current tour.)

This column is proof that we’re also working from the road, as time permits. Saying that we travel “inexpensively” is pretty subjective. What does that mean, exactly? It means [we were] pedaling through Italy on $20 a day [at the start of the trip]. That’s less than our living expenses in the United States. We thought we’d need to rush through Europe to maintain our savings but, much to our surprise and delight, we’re able to take our time.

Traveling this way isn’t for everyone. It requires a bit of sacrifice, effort and faith in humanity. But it will afford you authentic experiences, leave you with more money in your bank account and reward you a thousand times over.

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Swallow Bicycle Works completes the Trans America Trail

In early August, Sarah and Tom Swallow closed up their bike shop, Swallow Bicycle Works in Loveland, Ohio, and set out for the adventure of a lifetime. They hoped to be one of the first to complete the Trans America Trail, a cross-country route from North Carolina to Oregon on mostly gravel, dirt and otherwise unpaved roads. They completed the trip this week after ten weeks on the road. I caught up with Sarah to ask about the experience.

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For folks who aren’t familiar, can you tell us a little about the Trans America Trail route?

The Trans America Trail route is a primarily unpaved 5,000-mile transcontinental route designed by Sam Correro, intended for dual sport motorcycles. The surface of the route consists of mostly dirt and gravel roads, some sand, mud, high-clearance rocky roads, and some pavement.

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Does the route go through a lot of resupply points? How does it compare to traditional bike touring?

Because the route is designed for dual sport motorcycles, it intersects with small towns that have gas stations. The longest distance between resupply points for us was 150 miles, but most of the time it was 50 to 70 miles. The greater distances between resupply points in less populated areas like Northern Oklahoma, Utah, and Nevada required a lot more planning for food, water, and camping, as we would ride those sections in two to three days, depending on their difficulty. I suppose that traditional bike touring includes more frequent opportunities to resupply and to be in populated areas, but I think it depends on where you are bike touring.

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How difficult was it to navigate the route? Did you use GPS? Maps? A little of both? 

We had an easy time following the route using our GPS devices. Although it is not marked, hundreds of motorcyclists ride this route every year, so the route is fairly established with accurate and up-to-date GPX files and maps provided by Sam or GPS Kevin. We used a tablet with downloaded maps, along with local state road maps we would pick up along the way for additional reference. The tablet was also useful for when we had to modify the route files.

What were some of your personal motivations for the trip? 

There have been many. To name a few, it was to see what this route was all about, to see and learn from the world, and the simple pursuit of learning by doing. We wanted to experience it together, and to test our relationship with cycling, something we’ve made a life of with Swallow Bicycle Works.

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What kind of gear did you use? What would you recommend gear-wise for someone attempting it themselves?

Choosing a bicycle for this route wasn’t easy since we had no point of reference for what the route would be like other than the small sections we had ridden and the information from motorcyclists on the internet. We used information about the Tour Divide to establish an idea of what the ride could be like with the expectation that there would be more pavement and less climbing. Before this trip we had only done a handful of 3-day and one, 7-day off-road bike tours, so we had relatively little experience relevant to a trip of this proportion.

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We opted for what we had the most experience with for long-distance dirt road riding, which were steel-frame touring bicycles with Bruce Gordon 43mm on-/off-road tires and a centralized, lightweight minimal bike packing system. The overall system of equipment we selected was chosen to be an ideal balance of efficiency and comfort for the time that we had to ride the entire route, which we projected to be 500 miles per week for 10 weeks. Our estimates were not too far off, although there was a lot less pavement, a lot more large rocky sections, sand, mud, every kind of gravel there is, and some extremely steep grades.

After riding the route, we realized that our bikes were extremely capable, although biased to groomed road-like conditions, rather than rough rocky trails where we would have been more comfortable on a mountain bike. Our recommendation is to ride what is most comfortable to you on as many surfaces as you can imagine, and don’t ride anything less than a 43mm tire. Also, avoid an overly heavy setup in the case of extreme conditions requiring potential hike-a-bikes (i.e. flooding, mud, sand, snow, rock-slides, and other unknowns that affect a huge route subject to a variety of weather conditions). For a detailed list of what we packed, check out the Swallow Bicycle Works website.

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Can you share your favorite high point or maybe not-so-favorite low point for the trip?

The low points made the high points so much higher. One particular low point was riding 40 miles on and off through deep sand in the San Raphael Swell in the high desert of Utah, followed by an unexpectedly steep and technical 20-mile climb the following day. We had hit our limit of difficulty after only 35 miles and decided to call it a day, at which point the perfect camp spot appeared, located along a rushing creek, equipped with a fire ring, plenty of flat spots to lay the tent, and golden aspen trees and cedars all around. That night we drank as much water as we wanted, ate to our hearts’ content, and star gazed into the late hours of the night, until some clouds moved away and revealed the bright orange super moon lunar eclipse, an unexpected surprise.

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Keep reading

Read Sarah and Tom’s dispatches from the road on the SBWxTAT blog.

 

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A bike ride through Colombia’s coffee country

By Sean Jansen

If you look beyond the violent history of Colombia you will see a country that not only has moved on considerably from its past when Pablo Escobar was running things, but also a country that has something for everyone. It has the tropical climes of the Amazon, the Caribbean and the Pacific coasts. It stretches from massive cities to the Andes Mountains. If you trek deep into the misty hills you’ll find an area, nestled just south of the city of Medellin, that is famous for the country’s other top export. It is known as the Zona Cafetera, and that’s where the coffee is grown.

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I came to Colombia years ago for the first time via the sailboat crossing from Panama and it was on this boat where I tried Colombian coffee for the first time. I have had Panamanian, Indonesian, Bolivian and Brazilian coffee too, but it is really the Colombian coffee that sweeps all of them off of their feet. It is rich and thick with flavor, but also smooth enough that you need not add cream or sugar to enjoy it.

The region where I ventured on my most recent visit is near a town called Salento, close to the Valle de Cocora, a valley that looks straight out of Jurassic Park. Salento is a small town and it isn’t really known to tourists as the coffee hot spot, but it has fantastic coffee and a really cool way of getting to the plantations and surrounding areas.

Salento is only about 15 miles from a much larger city, but because the Andes are so treacherous it takes 45 minutes to get there. The only way to get to the plantations from Salento is on dirt roads, some of which are impossible to drive on. Therefore you can either walk, ride a horse, or get there the way we chose: by grabbing a couple mountain bikes and heading out to the plantations on two wheels.

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We rolled up and down the terrain of the Andes, all the while peering at vegetation that looked like something prehistoric. While trying to breathe the thin air more than a mile above sea level, it was lost to us what our ultimate goal of the trip was. We were completely taken away by the sheer bizarreness and beauty of a place that God clearly intended on being lost and never found. Going up and down on a bumpy dirt road puts into perspective how many little nooks and crannies there are still undiscovered and most likely untouched on this planet. We were seriously contemplating when a dinosaur would come out of the vegetation and cross the road. To think that the country’s famous coffee comes from this zone was something that dumbfounded us.

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After about 45 minutes of jaw dropping, life changing beauty, we arrived at the plantation and were immediately welcomed into the estate and given an introduction to the coffee. We learned about its journey from the plant in the soil to the black liquid in a cup that people all over the world rely on every day.

Coffee is grown between the altitudes of 1,800 and 6,000 feet on mountainsides and often interspersed with plantain and banana trees as the combination of plants help each other grow. Colombia is special because unlike some other coffee growing regions of the world, Colombia sits almost on the equator and has two growing seasons instead of just one.

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The coffee that we drink and the beans that we buy at the store are black because they are cooked and are ready to be ground and brewed to your desire, but they don’t look like that when they are first picked from the plant.

The guide explained to us how to use the colors of the leaves to see if the beans are ready or not and how to pick them. A coffee picker has to pick around 40 to 100 beans to make a single cup of coffee, which, if I were the picker, would take me about an hour.

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We all picked a coffee beans from the plants and tried our best to peel back the skin to get to the light brown inner bean. It is then ready to put into the caldron for cooking. Then the beans are dried in the sun, which could take up to a couple days. Finally once dried, they are placed into what is known as a popper.

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A popper is a device that not only heats up to an incredible temperature, but also stirs the beans every two to three seconds while they are roasting. In the popper they are cooked and stirred until the dark brownish black color comes about. Once achieved, they are taken out and cooled for approximately 12 hours. Then finally, after the hours it took to pick the beans, peel the skin, dry the beans, cook them and grind them, you are ready to have your first cup of coffee.

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And that we did, and that we were happily coaxed with the energy and stained teeth to continue cruising around the Andes mountains and the Zona Cafetera. Two of my favorite things in the world are coffee and cycling, and to have both of them together with such a spectacular setting, I’m not sure my afternoon could have been any better.

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Correction

An early version of this story made several references to “Columbia.” Columbia is the capital of South Carolina. The area was first visited by Hernando de Soto in 1540 and much of the city was destroyed during the Civil War. Today it is the home of the University of South Carolina and balances bustling redevelopment while maintaining its historic architecture. No coffee is grown there.

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Best bike touring gear for family travel

Editor’s note: Bicycle Times Issue #38 has a family theme, and we reached out to one of the most experienced travelers we know about how he has fared introducing his young son Sage to bicycle touring. In this online extra, Cass Gilbert talks about the gear that his family has found most useful along the way.


By Cass Gilbert

My son Sage is something of a seasoned traveller. At the ripe old age of two and three quarters, he’s already chalked up an impressive tally of countries visited, including the US, the UK, France, Chile and Ecuador. All of which have been enjoyed from the comfort of his bicycle trailer.

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As the miles have gone by, our gear choices have evolved. Before Sage was even born, we invested in a Thule Chariot trailer, choosing it thanks to its excellent suspension system, its fabled stoutness, and the broad range of accessories available. Summers are hot in New Mexico, so we invested in the more costly CX1, mainly because it features removable side windows. Otherwise, we’d have opted for the Cougar; it’s cheaper, lighter and simpler, yet uses the same well-regarded suspension system.

For the first few months, we used our Chariot exclusively as a stroller, pairing it with the Infant Sling accessory until Sage was old enough to sit up properly. At 18 months, we added a Yepp seat to our rig—first the Mini that mounts up front, then the Maxi that mounts on a rear rack, as Sage grew taller. We found the former far better for interaction (it’s perfect for pointing out things you see), but the latter better suited to longer, hillier rides, largely because you can pedal out of the saddle.

We’ve also experimented with Thule’s excellent RideAlong; it features a dual beam design that helps smooth out bumpy terrain, as well as useful arm rests and the ability to recline. It is, however, bigger and bulkier, and unfortunately the position of its mounting clamp wasn’t compatible with Nancy’s small sized, derailleured Surly Troll. I often ride a fat or 29+ bike, which really helps add to Sage’s comfort off road, and creates a very stable ride.

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But as great as seats are, trailers are still the best option for versatility, be it in the height of summer, the depths of winter, or for the inevitable inclement weather on tour. If your child is still napping, a trailer also provides the perfect cocoon; we’ve also noticed that Sage often enjoys having his own sense of space. For an extended trip, I expect a combination of a seat and trailer would be ideal—it’s the setup of choice for most families I met cycling through South America. As an aside, during our own longer journeys, we play music or audio books through our weather- and child-resistant Outdoor Tech Buckshot speaker to help pass the time.

What else? Given our propensity for seeking out dirt roads, we’ve fitted wider-volume BMX tires to the Chariot to increase comfort and stability. The Chariot’s a capable trailer, and handles the roughest terrain with unexpected aplomb—but care has to be taken when riding up curbs or over rocky surfaces, as two wheelers can occasionally flip over.

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During the last few months, we’ve borrowing a Tout Terrain Singletrailer. Although this single wheel design isn’t as versatile as the Chariot—it’s only a trailer, rather than a stroller, too—it performs superbly on singletrack, the ride is far smoother, and there’s less drag when accelerating (which, as Sage is now almost 40 pounds in weight, is very welcome). On the downside, the Singletrailer’s load capacity is limited and, although it folds into itself, it’s bulkier to travel with.

Note, too, that if you’re venturing abroad, a Chariot can masquerade as a stroller, traveling for free on airplanes (though I’d recommend wrapping it in a cover to protect it from the vagaries of the baggage handlers). I’d highly recommend both trailers in their own way. Both sport an eye-watering price tag, but if you intend to tour off road regularly, they make great investments and will really broaden the range of places you can explore.

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In terms of family-orientated cargo bikes, the only model we’ve tried is Surly’s Xtracycle-compatible longtail. The Big Dummy is a superb vehicle for hauling a family’s worth of gear and food, while its extended deck provides ideal real estate for a Yepp Maxi child seat. Compared to a standard bike, there’s a ton of breathing room between rider and child.

Again, we fitted the Big Dummy with the biggest tires we could find—Surly’s new 2.5-inch ExtraTerrestrials—to help smooth out bumpy terrain.  For trips around town and shorter, fair weather tours, an Xtracycle is a very compelling option. Given that Sage is just about three, I expect he’ll be progressing to a tag-along bike in the next year or so, or perhaps a Weehoo iGo. That’s a world we’ll be delving into soon.

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As for camping, we use a 3-person Big Agnes Copper Spur UL3. It’s light, roomy, easy to pitch and handles rain well. We also like our Black Diamond Mega Light tarp. Aside from being incredibly light and spacious, it’s perfect for grassy meadows and summer campouts—though watch out for ticks. Sage sleeps on a Therm-a-rest Prolite 3 Short sleeping pad, wrapped up in a Milk and Honey Down Sleep Sack and a down jacket. We’ve found this combination the best solution to his midnight wiggling. If it’s especially cold, he wears a woollen hat and gloves to bed. Much to his delight, Sage has his own headlamp, which he likes to wear when we read him his bedtime story. Gear is organized using Eagle Creek’s superlight Pack-It system—color coding keeps things fun.

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We use denatured alcohol to cook as it’s clean and easy. Sage can almost match us for appetite, so we’ve recently graduated from our minimal 1.2 liter ti pot to a 2.8 liter enamel-coated cauldron, made by Evernew. We consider good food a key component to sucessful family camping, so we’re happy to haul the extra weight. Water is filtered via Platypus’ quick and easy Gravity Works, which we can hang off a tree while we’re busying ourselves around the campsite.

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Sage’s toddler packlist

  • Milk and Honey Company down sleep sack
  • Merino wool sleep sack
  • Therm­a­rest Prolite 3 Short sleeping pad
  • Patagonia down sweater jacket
  • Patagonia hooded fleece jacket
  • Patagonia Torrentshell jacket
  • REI rain pants
  • Patagonia Capalene long underwear (used as Pjs)
  • NUI merino wool hat
  • 1 wool sweater
  • 2 pairs cotton sweatpants
  • 1 pair cotton leggings
  • 4 cotton shirts
  • 2 pairs shorts
  • 3 pairs of socks (2 cotton 1 wool )
  • Hand mitts
  • Sun Day Afternoon sun hat
  • High factor sun cream
  • High top shoes
  • 1 natural rubber pacifier
  • Favorite soft toy ­ Mono the Monkey
  • A couple small toys for trailer and soccer ball for campsite fun
  • Occasional Daniel Tiger and Sesame Street episodes on the iPad
  • Arnica for falls and bruises
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Klean Kanteen stainless steel water bottle for in the trailer
  • 2 cloth diapers for overnight accident prevention
  • Wipes
  • Black Diamond Wiz headlamp
  • Nutcase Watermelon Helmet

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Anhaica Bag Works: Convertible Backpack Pannier

Anhaica Bag Works (17 of 17)

Anhaica Bag Works (17 of 17)

Photos by Emily Walley

Marina Mertz, founder of Anhaica Bag Works, creates unique waxed canvas bags for both on and off the bike. The business is located in what we know as Tallahassee, Florida, but the name hearkens back to the city’s early roots as Anhaica, home and capital city of the Apalachee people.

Marina started small, sewing bags in a work space she rented from Tallahassee’s community bike shop, but soon her days were filled with crafting the Anahica collection, from bicycle touring bags to everyday totes. 

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The resulting product is beautiful. I was immediately drawn to the muted color palette and vintage aesthetic of the Anhaica line. I had the pleasure of testing out the Convertible Backpack Pannier: a versatile carryall for wherever your bike takes you.

The hand-waxed nature of the canvas gives the bag an aged appearance without sacrificing strength and regular use only enhanced its “weathered” style.

I have never bought a single yard of waxed canvas but instead spent months testing different mixtures of wax and application processes. We use 100% local beeswax for all of our bags. – Mertz

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As stated in the name, this particular Anhaica bag converts from backpack to pannier for convenient carrying on your back or on your bike, and it does so quite well. For use while riding, the shoulder straps are designed to tuck under a large velcro flap and the bag attaches to the rack via two sturdy plastic hooks. There is not a lower rack attachment on the bag so if your ride involves fast-rolling, rough terrain I’d recommend using a zip tie or two at the top, for some extra security.

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When worn as a backpack, the flap lives behind the straps. With the full bag length extending to 25 inches when open, 12 inches wide and 4.5 inches deep; it easily stows a 15-inch laptop in a padded case, a change of clothes and a lunch with room to spare. With the roll top closed, I had 18 inches of interior height. For grocery getting, it fits about one paper bag’s worth of goods. The straps are sewn below the pannier hooks, so they do not interfere with the bag’s wearability, and have a light padding making them comfortable even when loaded. 

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Between the wax coating and nylon lined interior, the bag can tolerate a bit of steady rain before your gear becomes wet. In a light shower, the water beaded up and brushed off. Anhaica recommends using the provided beeswax to keep the bag water-resistant and looking nice. The side seams are not sealed but they are covered by a layer of nylon helping to trap any moisture that could seep through. If you’re concerned about moisture, you could seal the seams yourself for a few dollars and a little time.

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The two side pockets with reflective accents aren’t quite a standard water bottle size, but they are right-sized for tools, a map, or a thermos. The large 8″ x 10” front zipper pocket works well for a phone, wallet and keys.

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I used the Convertible Backpack Pannier for toting stuff around the city. It’s a great commuter or book bag and could be easily be used for a light overnight. The Convertible Backpack Pannier is available in grey/brown (tested), blue/brown, and black for $220.

Check out the entire Anhaica line at anhaicabagworks.com. I’m particularly keen on the Lost Coast Tote and the Bucket bag

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Born below the sandy pines of North Florida, on the sun softened pavement of canopy roads, under the deluge of southern thunderstorms and from the desire to create bags that don’t sacrifice style for function. – Anhaica Bag Works

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Recommendo: Flat pedals for touring and bikepacking

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Like many gear-oriented guys I know, when I first got into cycling I went all in. I bought the spandex shorts, the fingerless gloves, and of course, those wacky clip-in pedals. But now that I’m a little older and wiser, or at least a lot more pragmatic, I’ve taken a shine to flat pedals for touring and bikepacking adventures.

I think about it this way: when I’m out and about exploring, ultimate power transfer to the pedals isn’t my top priority. I would gladly trade a few watts for the ability to get off my bike and explore a waterfall, drop into a cafe or set up camp without having to walk in clipless shoes or carry an extra pair.

So flat pedals it is, but I’m certainly not going to ride on the freebie plastic things that are probably going to snap in half in the middle of nowhere. Luckily high quality options abound, thanks to mountain bike riders and their durability requirements. These three pedals are designed largely for aggressive mountain bike riding, but I’ve borrowed them for a bit from our sister magazine, Dirt Rag, for use on road and off-road adventures.

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Spank Spike – $130

These are the pedals that kindled my love for high-end flats. They have a huge platform and look great. The three-quarter axle is hollow tapered steel with a bushing on the outboard side and a sealed bearing on the inboard side. While the big inboard bearing keeps things spinning nicely, it isn’t big enough to cause any annoying run on the instep of your foot. I measured the spread of the pins—where you’re feet actually make contact— with my Feedback Sports calipers and it is approximately 100 mm front to back and 102 mm side to side.

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The lack of a pedal wrench spot on the axle also means the Q-factor is kept narrow. The aluminum body is available in six colors and the 20 pins thread in from the opposite side for easy replacement or adjustment. The body is essentially flat and measured just more than 12 mm thick. The Spikes weigh in at 439 grams per pair, and like each of the pedals in this group they are completely serviceable and rebuildable.


 

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Specialized Boomslang – $180

Years in the making, the Boomslang pedals are typical of Specialized products in that they are high tech and sleek. The aluminum body is all swoops and curves and has a slightly concave shape I measured at more than 13 mm at the edges and 11 mm at the inside. Rather than use an outboard bushing it uses a unique design in that the outer needle bearing is accessed through a little trap door held in place by the pins. The inner bearing is a standard, sealed radial unit.

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Each pedals has 22 pins with an hourglass shape that allows them to snap off in a controlled manner. If they do, there are four extras threaded into each pedal on the side. I measured their spread at 90 mm front to back and 105 mm side to side. The Boomslang pedals are a bit smaller and feel a bit thicker than the others in this group, perhaps because of the height of the pins. Some drawbacks are that they require a special spanner tool to access the inner bearing and the middle pins cannot be removed because they hold the door to the outer bearing in place. Like Henry Ford’s finest, they’re only available only in black.


 

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VP Harrier – $120

I thought the Spike and Boomslang pedals were big until I saw the Harriers. These things are HUGE. They use a chromoly axle and an outboard bushing, but the inner bearing is an Igus polymer bearing which is much smaller and thinner than a sealed radial bearing. This means there barely bulge at all where the axle meets the crank arm.

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Each pedal has six pins per side that thread in from the opposite side, plus four pointy pins that use a standard box wrench. I measured the pins at 91 mm front to rear and 107 mm side to side. The squared off shape of the body maximizes real estate, something I appreciate when riding in boots. In addition to this deep red they’re also available in black or silver.

Conclusion

All of these pedals are high-end offerings designed to be battered on trails and ridden hard, so I have no doubt they are all plenty durable enough for touring. The VP Harriers get my vote because of their huge platform, lower weight and simplified bearing design. Plus they’re the least expensive in this group.

What kind of pedals do you use for touring?

 

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First impressions: Trek 920 rugged touring bike

Bicycle Times Trek 920

The Trek 920 blurs the line between “gravel” bikes and loaded touring bikes.

The whole concept of bicycle touring has been turned on its ear in the past few years. For a generation the idea was loading up a stalwart Trek 520 and following the pavement wherever it took you. Today many folks don’t even start their tour until they find where the pavement ends. Rides like the Tour Divide or the Oregon Outback have made back roads the new main street for bike touring, and Trek has designed the new 920 model for exploring on dirt, gravel and beyond. (Trek also debuted a new 720 light touring model.)

Bicycle Times Trek 920

The parts spec uses a traditional touring layout but swaps in some high-tech mountain bike components.

The all-new aluminum frame and fork are more reminiscent of a mountain bike than a traditional, steel touring rig. The massive tubes keep things from twisting when loaded or traversing rough terrain. The distinctive kink in the top tube adds room for a second bottle cage on the down tube, meaning there is room for four bottle cages on the main triangle, as well as one on each fork leg.

Bicycle Times Trek 920

Thru-axles front and rear add stiffness and security.

The 920 can be stripped down for events like the Dirty Kanza 200 or run with its included front and rear aluminum racks, giving you all the carrying capacity you could want. And while it may look a bit like a traditional touring bike with this set up, the details make it anything but. The Bontrager Duster wheels and knobby 29×2.0 Bontrager XR1 tires are straight from the brand’s mountain bike line, as are the inclusion of thru-axles front and rear.

Bicycle Times Trek 920

Braking is handled by the excellent TRP Hylex hydraulic system.

The drivetrain is a curious mix as well, with traditional-looking bar end shifters paired with a SRAM S1000 42/28 mountain bike crankset and 11-36 cassette. Keeping your loaded rig under control is made much easier with the TRP Hylex hydraulic disc brakes. After using these for a few weeks it’s impossible to imagine going back to cantilevers.

Bicycle Times Trek 920

The frame can also fit fenders for double duty as a commuter, something that should normally be essential here in Oregon.

I’ve been riding the Trek 920 on back roads all over Oregon in the past few weeks (aided by an alarming lack of snowpack) and thus far it has been an excellent adventure partner. Watch for an in-depth review soon.

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Vital stats

Price: $2,090

Weight: 28.13 pounds, w/racks

Sizes: 49, 52, 54, 56, 58 (tested), 61cm

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First Impressions: Trek 720 Disc light adventure touring

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For decades Trek has offered its model 520 steel touring model, specced with bar-end shifters, a rear rack, braze-ons for fenders and low-rider front rack, and clearance for chubby tires to tackle any terrain. For 2015, two new models are joining it in Trek stores: the rugged 920 adventure bike and the lightweight 720, both made with aluminum frames and decidedly different than each other and their grandpappy, the 520.

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The 720 Disc is indeed aimed at more of the mixed-use crowd—riders who spend most of their time behind bars on asphalt—but who enjoy a taste of speed with the ability to tackle a little gravel. The handlebar height is similar to my daily rider, which I use on fast lunch rides in the hills for fitness, and the frame’s geometry is more on the aggressive side, which suits me fine.

The Gear

Trek, along with its house brand Bontrager, developed a plastic snap-in front lowrider dry-bag system for the carbon touring fork to carry some necessities. This frees up the rider’s back for a hydration pack for longer, hotter rides, or allows a pack-rat to carry as much stuff as they need. The rear triangle can also fit a standard rack, and Bontrager has several to choose from.

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The 11-32-tooth, 11-speed cassette offers low enough gearing to handle long, steep climbs, and the 50/34 front chainrings allow a nice cadence on the flats, which I enjoy because I’m partial to doubles. I also like Shimano’s reliable 105 group, and the 720 includes shift/brake levers, derailleurs, cassette and chain, plus the RS500 crankset. Shifting has been crisp and reliable, and I need to tighten up the stretched cables a little to make things perfect after several rides.

The Ride

The 700x28c Bontrager AW1 Hard-Case Lite tires roll smoothly with 100 psi, and as of this post I’ve not suffered any flats. I’ve ridden several hundred miles on Bontrager tires the past few years, and have grown to appreciate the connection I feel to the road, which gives me a bit more confidence when cornering.

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I’ve also grown accustomed to looking down and seeing disc brakes on my drop-bar bikes, and the TRP HY/RD cable-actuated, hydraulic hybrid disc brakes have become my favorite since testing the Pivot Vault in 2014: squeeze the brake lever and speed is scrubbed with little effort.

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Like the Ibis Hakkalügi Disc I repurposed last fall, the Bontrager wheels are wide, round and true, even after several rides, providing a nice no-hassle ride. Unlike the ‘Lugi, the 720 Disc has fitting for fenders.

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At 21 pounds without pedals and dry bags mounted on my 58 cm test sample, the 720 Disc won’t win any weight weenie contests, but that’s not the point. This is a bike designed to be loaded down, and smart bikes like this only feel better with extra stuff bolted or strapped on. Trek knows this from its tenure with the popular 520.

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Thoughts

The 720 Disc can handle fast rides with the Lycra crowd, or become a mule on longer overnight excursions. The graphite finish with lime and green highlights provide enough of a neutral palette, and with a few simple modifications (like Cher’s costume changes between songs), you’ll have a diva of your own to go wherever you like.

Stay tuned for a more in-depth review of the 720 after we’ve had a chance to spend more time riding it.

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Vital Stats

  • Price: $1,979
  • Weight: 21.1 pounds w/o pedals
  • Sizes: 49, 52, 54, 56, 58 (tested), 61 cm
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Swift Industries: Junior Ranger Panniers

Swift Junior Ranger Panniers (8 of 8)

Swift Junior Ranger Panniers (8 of 8)

I love Swift’s retro aesthetic so you can imagine my excitement when the Junior Ranger Panniers arrived for review. My respect for their product is fueled by the fact that Swift bags and panniers are entirely handmade in Seattle, Washington, by a small team of four adventurous individuals.

The Junior Ranger Panniers were born out of a desire to pedal with less. Less space equals less stuff and as someone who went through a major “stuff purge” in 2014 I can appreciate Swift’s drive to go small on these panniers. The Junior Ranger is Swift’s smallest and lightest touring pannier, weighing in at 3.5 pounds and 20 liters capacity per pair.

The bags have the sturdy construction and feel that one expects from 1,000-Denier Cordura fabric. It’s water repellent thanks to the urethane coating and very abrasion resistant. Inside you’ll find a waterproof lining, but the seams are not sealed. Regardless, they’d shed a lot of water before your gear gets wet. If the unsealed seams are a concern you could seal the seams yourself with a $8 tube of seam sealer. Alternatively, Swift suggests buying a pair of Sea to Summit Ultra Sil Dry Sacks to ensure that your gear stays dry.

Swift Junior Ranger Panniers (2 of 8)

The Junior Rangers attach to the rack via Swift’s hook and bungee mounting system. Bungee tension is adjustable by replacing the knot in the cord. It took me a couple tries to get the tension where it needed to be to keep the bags from sliding forward over rough terrain, but once I achieved the right tension the bags didn’t budge. The handle on the backside of the pannier makes it easy to secure the lower hook, then tension the bungee to hang the bag on the rack.

Swift Junior Ranger Panniers (1 of 8) Swift Junior Ranger Panniers (7 of 8)

A roll-top closure with the option to buckle at the top or on the sides of the pannier, allows you to modify the size of the bag. There are two unlined exterior pockets, one elastic opening suitable for an additional water bottle and a front pocket large enough for quick-grab snacks or other small items.

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In terms of capacity, the Junior Ranger’s size will certainly keep you in check while you’re packing gear; but honestly, they don’t feel that small. I could easily do an overnight or an ultralight weekend trip in nice weather. If you’re going on an extended tour these would make a great second set of bags for a front rack. The elastic pockets are an awesome feature with the panniers on a front rack, putting additional water bottles at arms reach.

They’re also right-sized for day-to-day commuting. On trips to my studio the elastic pocket housed my travel mug. Inside one bag I fit a change of clothes, extra shoes, my DSLR plus an extra lens, and my lunch. Another plus, these bags are nicely scaled for a small size frame.

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The Junior Ranger Panniers are available in fuchsia (tested), olive, or steel. The bright fuchsia was great for daytime visibility and there’s a reflective strip on the rear facing panel of the pannier for visibility at night. These are going to last for years to come and certainly worth the $220 as a touring pannier or and everyday commuter.

The Swift business motto is the same motto they stick to on a bike tour and is one we can all take a little inspiration from, regardless of the path pedaled.

Trust that you’re capable of going the distance

Let the experience fuel your creativity

Have a plan, and plan not to stick with it

Enjoy your encounters with the people you meet along the way

Move steadily and with purpose

Heighten your sense of place

Find inspiration in the little things

Get lost every once in a while

Be aware of the impact that you make

 

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U.S. Bicycle Route System expands with 1,253 new miles

The Adventure Cycling Association and the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) has created 1,253 miles of new U.S. Bicycle Routes along the East Coast. The U.S. Bicycle Route System (USBRS) now encompasses 8,042 miles of routes in 16 states and the District of Columbia.

The new routes include USBR 1 in Massachusetts and Florida, USBR 10 in Michigan, USBR 11 in Maryland, and USBR 90 in Florida. Realignments were also approved for USBR 76 and USBR 1 in Virginia, which were originally designated in 1982.

The U.S. Bicycle Route System is a developing national network of numbered and signed bicycle routes that connect people, communities, and the nation.

Similar to emerging international networks, such as Europe’s EuroVelo network and Quebec’s La Route Verte, the U.S. Bicycle Route System provides important recreational and transportation options for the active traveler. Currently, more than 40 states are working to develop route corridors into official U.S. Bicycle Routes to be approved by AASHTO.

The network is expected to soon become the largest network of cycling routes in the world.

New routes

U.S. Bicycle Route 1 in Florida (584.4 miles)

U.S. Bicycle Route 1 follows Florida’s Atlantic coast from Key West to Jacksonville, where it ends at the Georgia State Line. Much of USBR 1 follows the East Coast Greenway and Adventure Cycling Association’s Atlantic Coast Route. The route includes many scenic beaches and intersects cities and towns along the way.

State Bicycle Coordinator DeWayne Carver said that FLDOT plans to designate more U.S. Bicycle Routes in the near future.

U.S. Bicycle Route 90 in Florida (423.8 miles)

U.S. Bicycle Route 90 is an east-west route that connects the Alabama border to Florida’s Atlantic Coast in Butler Beach, just south of St Augustine. The route partly follows Adventure Cycling’s Southern Tier route and traverses rural north Florida through pastures, forests, and small towns, with a few “big city” stops in Pensacola and Tallahassee.

Bicyclists interested in riding U.S. Bicycle Routes in Florida can find maps, turn-by-turn directions and other information at the state’s DOT website.

U.S. Bicycle Route 11 in Maryland (34 miles)

US Bicycle Route 11 runs for 34 miles from the Pennsylvania state line northwest of Hagerstown to Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. There are a variety of urban and scenic attractions along the route, which follows a combination of rural roads, state highways and off-road trails.

Cyclists can stop in downtown Hagerstown and explore its historical and art museums located in the picturesque Hagerstown City Park. For bicycle travelers interested in civil war history, there are many historical attractions along or near the route, including the National War Correspondents Memorial in Gathland State Park, the Antietam National Battlefield, and Harpers Ferry National Historical Park.

USBR 11 also traverses the traffic-free, scenic Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Towpath (also designated as U.S. Bicycle Route 50) for 2.6 miles until it reaches Harpers Ferry.

For more information on bicycling in Maryland, visit the Maryland Department of Transportation Bicycle and Pedestrian website.

U.S. Bicycle Route 1 in Massachusetts (18 miles)

The Massachusetts Department of Transportation has designated two new segments along U.S. Bicycle Route 1, adding 18 miles to the route, which now totals 38 miles. The two new segments offer a glimpse of what makes Massachusetts a special place for local and long-distance travelers alike, with an array of landscapes and settlements along urban and rural byways.

The more northerly segment of USBR 1 in Salisbury and Newburyport straddles the majestic Merrimack River. While the Salisbury Old Eastern Marsh Trail provides proximity to expansive Atlantic Ocean beaches, Newburyport’s Clipper City Rail Trail reminds riders that the City’s clipper ships were once the fastest on the seas, spawning a global maritime trade. Both communities also offer nature preserves and museums in close proximity to USBR 1.

Further south, USBR 1 traverses through the communities of Topsfield, Wenham, Danvers, and Peabody, which are removed from the Atlantic and offer a different experience of Massachusetts. Wetlands remind cyclists of glacial epochs long past, and boardwalks provide opportunities to explore these landscapes and natural history.

U.S. Bicycle Route 10 in Michigan (193 miles)

U.S Bicycle Route 10 stretches for 193 miles along U.S. 2 and connects the eastern and central portions of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. The eastern terminus connects with U.S. Bicycle Route 35 in St. Ignace.

As the route travels west to Iron Mountain, Michigan, travelers are presented with stunning views of the Mackinac Bridge, rolling sand dunes along Lake Michigan, and tourist attractions like the famous Mystery Spot. The gently rolling route passes numerous parks, state and national forest lands, and scenic overlooks. Along the way, small lumber towns and rural communities offer everything a bicycle traveler could need every 20 to 30 miles.

Michigan is now tied with Florida for second place among states for USBR mileage (1,008 miles), with Alaska having the highest mileage (1,414 miles).

U.S. Bicycle Route 1 Realignment in Virginia (6 miles added)

The Virginia Department of Transportation has realigned U.S. Bicycle Route 1 in Northern Virginia to provide a safer and more reliable route for cyclists. Increased traffic volumes, changes to access through Ft. Belvoir, and the closure of a bridge on Gunston Cove Road were all factors which triggered a re-evaluation of the existing route. The realignment improved the scenic appeal of the route by adding more mileage along the Potomac River.

USBR 1 in Northern Virginia travels by several interesting and historic sites including Historic Occoquan, Mt. Vernon (Home of George Washington), Woodlawn Plantation, the Pope-Leighey house (designed by Frank Lloyd Wright), George Washington’s Grist Mill, and Old Town Alexandria. The route now ends at the 14th St Bridge in Washington DC.

United States Bicycle Route 76 Realignment in Virginia (6 miles removed)

The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) has realigned U.S. Bicycle Route 76 in the Staunton District to provide a safer, more direct route for cyclists. The route was realigned just north of Lexington to Route 56 near Vesuvius and matches the existing Adventure Cycling TransAmerica Trail route. The new route follows roads with lower-volume traffic and avoids two interstate interchanges.

This section of USBR 76 passes through the historic city of Lexington, home of the Virginia Military Institute and Washington and Lee University. For eastbound cyclists, this section of USBR 76 is the last part of the route in the Shenandoah Valley and skirts the western foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

The northern end of the realignment ends at Route 56 which then quickly climbs 2,000 feet over four miles to the Blue Ridge Parkway. The 17-mile section of the Blue Ridge Parkway offers numerous scenic views and is consistently noted as one of the highlights of the TransAmerica Trail by cross country cyclists.

Maps of the TransAmerica Trail are available at Adventure Cycling and more information about the USBR 76 route changes is available on the VDOT website.

What’s next

The U.S. Bicycle Route System will eventually be the largest bicycle-route network in the world, encompassing more than 50,000 miles of routes. Adventure Cycling also provides an updated list of links to maps and other resources for cyclists wishing to ride an established U.S. Bicycle Route on its Use a U.S. Bicycle Route page.

Support for the U.S. Bicycle Route System comes from Adventure Cycling members, donors, and a group of business sponsors that participate in the annual Build It. Bike It. Be a Part of It. fundraiser each May. The U.S. Bicycle Route System is supported in part by grants from the Tawani Foundation, Lazar Foundation, and Climate Ride.

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