Bikeshare.com offers international bike share directory and more

Bikeshare.com is a website designed to help connect users, system operators, sponsors and suppliers and to inform those interested in bike share on the latest trends and developments in the industry.

Bikeshare.com takes pride in being a supporter of bike share systems around the world and will make launching new bike share systems more accessible for interested cities and companies. The launch of Bikeshare.com is just one of the many ways Cyclehop aims to help this exciting industry move forward.

Created with the user experience in mind, the website features an ever-growing directory of bike share systems and equipment vendors, industry news and trends, sponsorship opportunities, job postings, and more.

Bikeshare.com gives users the ability to discover bike share systems available to them whether it operates as a Public, Private, or University system. Bike share system owners will have the opportunity to claim an enhanced listing giving them the ability to add contact information, plans available, live station status, and more.

For a limited time, bike share systems can claim an enhanced bike share listing for free. Bikeshare.com’s marketplace is designed to connect individuals and companies with innovative suppliers, sponsors, and those seeking jobs in the industry. Vendors can showcase products and promote their services giving their brand the ability to connect with system owners and reach millions of bike share users around the globe. To celebrate the new website launch, vendors can claim their listing and get 50% off with discount code bikeshare50.

The news section of Bikeshare.com will ensure no one gets left behind in this rapidly changing industry. Subscribe to the newsletter or visit the site for the latest news and industry developments that will benefit anyone interested in bike share.

The global bike share market is expanding quickly. With the introduction of new technology and a growing user base more people will use bike share in 2018 than in all prior years combined.

For more information, visit bikeshare.com or contact Sam Cawkell at sam@bikeshare.com.

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Opinion: Dockless bike sharing creating chaos

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My immediate response when I heard about dockless bike share was “More butts on bikes, great.“ Then I started to ask questions. “So what do you do with it when you’re done?” “I could just leave it anywhere?… that doesn’t sound like a good idea.”

Dockless bike sharing launched in the United States this year, but is it a good thing? As of August 2017, Seattle became the first city in the United States to try dockless bike share. In September, a dockless bike share launched in D.C.

This bike share program is referred to as the “Uber” of bike sharing. Here is the concept behind dockless: You download an app, it locates a bike near you, you unlock the wheel with the app, and you pay roughly $1.00 for 30 minutes of use (this can differ based on the bike share company), park it when you’re done, manually lock it. That’s it. Definitely sounds affordable and more convenient than finding a bike share docking station and hoping there is a bike available, or hoping that a station has a parking spot available for the bike you have rented and are done with.

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If you look at China there are over 40 dockless bike share companies currently, with over 350,000 bikes and growing daily. But the problems that dockless bike shares have create have been reported multiple times. Bikes are left in the middle of sidewalks so that pedestrians cannot get to their destinations, which is especially a problem for senior citizens trying to walk with grocery carts, strollers and rascals. Bikes are being left basically everywhere – in huge bike piles, in trees, dumped in rivers, garbage cans – you name it and a dockless bike has probably been parked there in China.

So, how is Seattle doing with their new program? According to a recent Seattle Times report it’s going about the same as in China – dockless bikes are being parked irresponsibly.

And how about D.C.? You guessed it! In October, the Washington Post reported the same problems.

You will always have people who abuse programs or who don’t care to be responsible adults. But there is another problem this “Uber-style” bike share is causing. Not only is it creating another level of irresponsibility in busy cities, but it is not good for the commuter cycling community. Aggression on the streets towards cyclist continues to increase and having these bikes laying everywhere is just furthering that anger towards our community, further adding to the negativity anti-cyclists have. 

Docks create a place where you have to put something away. People are lazy and I include myself in that category, I love convenience and when things are easy. If you give someone the opportunity to be lazy, the majority of the population is probably going to just leave that bike parked in the middle of a pedestrian sidewalk. It’s naive to think that people will park things appropriately. If we continue to grow this program in the United States, are we destined for the large-scale problem China is currently facing.

What do you think about dockless bike share? Does your city have a dockless bike program? Have you tried it? Have you seen the chaos of bikes in weird places? Let’s discuss below!

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IKEA launches pilot program in Portland to encourage bike sharing

Words by Jeffrey Stern. Photos courtesy of Spinlister. 

Aimed at individuals who use their bicycles to commute, run errands and get around town on a daily basis, the new program launched in conjunction with Spinlister hopes to get more people in the already bike crazy town not only riding, but sharing their new IKEA SLADDA bikes.

Starting on Earth Day last month (April 22nd), IKEA launched their one-of- a-kind SLADDA bike partnership with Spinlister in their Portland, Oregon at 10280 NE Cascades Parkway location.

Alessandra Zini, the IKEA Portland store manager said, “Portland knows its bikes. We think Spinlister offers a great opportunity for our customers to try SLADDA before they buy it.”

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With Portland already boasting the highest rate of bicycle commuters in America and Earth Day being associated with green initiatives such as alternative modes of transportation like cycling, this geographic specific test-launch doesn’t come as a surprise.

Details on the Portland launch running from April 22nd to July 22nd are as follows:

Portland area IKEA Family members receive a $150 discount on the SLADDA bike bringing the cost down to $349. Once the SLADDA is purchased, owners can list their bikes on Spinlister with 0% listing fees until the entire cost of the bike is recovered from rentals. Spinlister normally takes a 17.5% listing fee on the daily rental price. Sounds like an easy way to pay off a sweet new commuter, right?

Offered with front and rear racks, a cargo trailer and powered by an automatic 2-gear belt drivetrain integrated into the rear hub, it looks like quite a few Portland cyclists have taken advantage of the offer already, posting their bikes for $5/hour, $20/day or $100/week making the return on their investment quite swift.

“We’re thrilled to be able to introduce the SLADDA bike from IKEA to the Spinlister community,” says Marcelo Loureiro, CEO of Spinlister in a press release from IKEA.

“Providing sustainable and affordable urban transportation is a core facet of the Spinlister platform, and partnering with IKEA offers us the opportunity to share that vision with more riders. By adding their new SLADDA bike range to Spinlister’s global marketplace, IKEA is staking a bold position at the forefront of the bike sharing economy,” he continued.

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Typical bike rental prices run upwards of $25 or more per day on Spinlister, so the SLADDA price is a good deal that should entice more users to the bike sharing platform based in Santa Monica, California.

It’s important to note that the actual location of the IKEA Portland store is not easily accessible by the current bike routes in the city. Perhaps if the pilot is successful, not only will more stores around the country be featuring the Spinlister SLADDA deal, but it could spearhead better bicycle infrastructure in the surrounding neighborhoods as well; a win-win for all parties involved, getting more economically friendly bike options on the road throughout the country.

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Nike signs on to sponsor Portland bike share system

Despite being known as the most bike-friendly large city in America, Portland, Oregon, is also one of the few major cities without a bike share system of its own. Now, thanks to a $10 million commitment from Nike, its bike share system will launch this summer with 1,000 orange bikes bearing the classic swoosh. The color is the same shade as the original Nike shoeboxes from 1971.

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The system and the bikes will be known as Biketown, which is fitting as Nike had previously branded its birthplace of Eugene, Oregon, as Tracktown. The bikes will be bright orange and Nike will oversee their design, as well as that of the stations and the system’s digital presence.

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The system is set to launch in July 2016 and will be operated by Motivate, a bikeshare management system used in New York, Chicago, the Bay Area, Washington D.C., Boston, Seattle, Toronto, Melbourne, Australia, and more cities around the world.

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The bicycles themselves will be created by Social Bicycles (SoBi), a Brooklyn-based transportation technology company. A second-generation system, it has the renting and locking mechanisms built into the bikes themselves.

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New bike share system coming to The Ohio State University

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A new bike share system is being planned for one of the largest universities in the nation, and it offers some interesting new features not found on standard models.

Zagster currently operates bicycle-sharing programs at Yale University, Duke University, Princeton University, Santa Clara University and California State University, East Bay. Now it is in negotiations to operate at The Ohio State University.

The system will start with 115 bicycles and 15 stations, delivering a safe and sustainable alternative transportation option for the university community. Zagster hopes to have the system up and running in time for fall classes. In addition to commuter bicycles, the system will eventually include tandem, hand cycle, electric assist, heavy duty and three-wheeled cargo bikes.

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The standard models, built by Breezer, will also have an integrated lock that is controlled by an app so they can be taken off-campus, into town or to a friend’s house and locked safely without a docking setup nearby. In fact, all the electronics that power the system are stored on the bike, so they can only be accessed via smartphone instead of through a kiosk. This helps keep the price down for Zagster’s other bike share clients, namely universities, businesses, hotels and other non-municipal entities.

In conjunction with the bicycle-sharing system, the university plans to expand educational safety programming and implement a helmet program, supported by a grant from the Ohio Department of Transportation. Zagster plans to offer students internships and other employment opportunities along with developing research collaborations with faculty.

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Spinlister unveils new peer-to-peer bike share model

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Traditional bike share programs operate as private businesses. A company or municipality owns the bikes and runs the operation and logistics, and (usually) a corporate sponsor helps provide the funding. Spinlister, a peer to peer bike renting app, is hoping to turn the model on its head with a new bike share program launching this year in Portland, Oregon.

Currently the Spinlister service works by allowing users to rent out their own private bicycles, surfboards and snowboards to other users. The new system will actually include a specific bicycle that can be available to users at any time. There is no hub or central station and the bikes will use the city’s existing bike rack infrastructure.

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The bikes, made by Dutch company VanMoof, are still privately owned, but Spinlister says it plans to subsidize and finance the bikes to make the barrier of entry lower, and owners can actually make money with them over time. They will feature an integrated lock controlled by Bluetooth that will allow it to be unlocked with the mobile app. It has an on-board computer that allows it to be tracked by the network and record when and where it is rented. The system will likely come in handy considering Portland’s huge bicycle theft rate.

The bike also has 2-speed Sturmey Archer or 8-speed Alfine hubs, flat-resistant tires, dynamo-powered lighting and an adjustable seatpost. Spinlister says that after the beta test in Portland, maintenance of the bikes will be the responsibility of the owners, but the network will partner with local bike shops for discounts on service.

With all that technology on board the bikes will likely be expensive, though no set price has been established yet. Spinlister says that by earning money renting the bike, owners will be able to bring the price invested down under $1,000.

If all goes well, Spinlister hopes to expand to significant supply density in San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles and Austin. Look for bikes to be arrive in Portland in “late summer.”

 

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NPR: Low-income riders are rare on bike share

Bike sharing systems are meant to make simple and practical transportation options available to more people, but rates of ridership among low-income users is incredibly low. According to Transportation Alternatives, only 0.5 percent of riders on New York’s CitiBike system are categorized as low-income.

[It] may have something do with where the docking stations are located. But the people who run these systems say they’re businesses. And they have to start where the demand for cycling is greatest. Paul DeMaio is a consultant who worked with Capital Bike Share in Washington, D.C.

Systems are forced to go for the low-hanging fruit — the neighborhoods that have the highest density of commercial, of residential. And that are gonna provide the most ridership to help pay for the service. And then hopefully catch up with the outlying neighborhoods as quickly as they can.

But it’s more than just location. Even when these stations are sited in low-income neighborhoods, they often go under-used. Partly, this may be about price. A typical bike-sharing membership costs somewhere between $60 and $100 a year. Many of these systems offer discounts for low-income riders, but they’re not always well-known or advertised.

Listen to or read the full story from NPR here.

 

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