Win a BikeFlights prize pack

BikeFlights has partnered with us to give one winner will a BikeFlights.com cardboard bike shipping box and a voucher good for up to $200 off shipping rates for a shipment on BikeFlights.com. Check out BikeFlights story and enter to win below!

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BikeFlights Bike Box

 

Single-use voucher is good for one-way, round-trip or multi-city orders at any shipping speed. The discount is applied to the “shipping rates” and does not include fees for pickup, residential delivery and/or shipping protection charges.

 

 

Complete the survey below by 11:59 p.m., March 29, 2017 to be entered to win. We will choose and notify a winner the following day. Some terms and conditions apply, but don’t they always? Open to U.S. residents, only. Sorry, but that’s not our choice.

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National Bike Summit Recap Part 3: Jamie from The City of Fort Collins FC Bikes Program

This is the final installment of the National Bike Summit Recap. We highlighted a tiny fraction of the organizations and people that attended this year’s event. Again, the role that these organizations play in bicycle and pedestrian safety is extremely important. So go support your local bicycle advocacy group; become a member, volunteer, go to an education class, attend and support hosted events.

Our last Q&A is with Jamie from The City of Fort Collins FC Bike Program. Jamie hosted a sessions called “Bicycle Friendly Driver” a successful education class that she hopes to share to the masses. The “Bicycle Friendly Driver” class teaches what is legal or illegal with photo reference, it teaches and emphasizes little things that can be done to prevent injuring a pedestrian or cyclist; open your car door with your right hand (makes you look over your shoulder), slow down and pass with care, what are the passing laws, etc. This is a program that Jamie and her colleagues have taken to the Fort Collins transportation service and has taught all the drivers how to be a “Bicycle Friendly Driver”, they have taken this to trucking companies, sanitation companies and more. Everyone who passes receives a sticker for their vehicle, and a certificate to show off. I’m sure we’ll hear more on this program’s success in the coming years.

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Go here to read the Part 1 with Kyle from the Shenandoah Valley Bicycle Coalition and go here to read Part 2 with Julie from Bike PGH.

Bike Summit Attendee: Jamie Gaskill-Fox
Organization: The City of Fort Collins FC Bikes Program

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Tell me why did you attended the National Bike Summit? I attended the Summit because I was invited by the League to do a session on the Bicycle Friendly Program that we developed and have been implementing in Fort Collins since December 2015.

What are some easy ways for people to get involved and support an organization like yours? 1) Ride your bike and do so in a safe and lawful manner.  Be the example – the more of us who are positive examples on a daily basis, the safer we will all be and the more support we will have in the long run. 2) Vote to support sustainable transportation. Our programs won’t exist without the support of voters. 3) Volunteer with our organization – we’re always looking for more awesome Ambassadors.  Ambassadors help educate others about safe cycling and encourage others to ride. Plus, Ambassadors help reinforce the positive cycling community.

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Why should people support organizations like yours? The work that we do makes roadways safer and easier to travel for ALL people. Our programming also helps meet much larger strategic goals such as climate action goals and reducing traffic congestion.

What was your #1 takeaway from the Summit? Even though there are great things happening across the country in regards to making our communities better for bicycling, we are at a critical time when we need to reflect on what we want the future to look like for people who ride bikes and to make it happen.. We need to find new ways to reach people through each of the 5 (now 6) Es. and engage them in a way that  spurs them into action.  Change is good – just as long as we grab it by the handlebars and steer it the way we need to go to make a better biking nation.

 

 

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Win a pair of Michelin tires

Contest ended. Congrats to Charles Overlay of Oakfield, TN!

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Michelin has partnered with us to give one winner a pair of MICHELIN Protek Max tires. Enter to win below.

With a super durable 5mm puncture protection layer, reflective sidewall, and Protek tread pattern, the MICHELIN Protek Max tire offers riders the speed of a road tire, with the durability of a commuter tire.

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These tires come in several sizes and the winner will be able to choose from the following size options: 26 x 1.4”, 26 x 1.85”, 700 x 28mm, 700 x 32mm, 700 x 35mm, 700 x 38mm.

 

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Complete the survey below by 11:59 p.m., March 22, 2017 to be entered to win. We will choose and notify a winner the following day. Some terms and conditions apply, but don’t they always? Open to U.S. residents, only. Sorry, but that’s not our choice.

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National Bike Summit Recap Part 2: Julie from Bike PGH

For the National Bike Summit Recap, we are highlighting some of the amazing organizations and people that attended this year’s event. The role that these organizations play in bicycle and pedestrian safety is extremely important. Go here to read the Part 1 Recap.

Bike Summit Attendee: Julie Mallis
Organization: Bike PGH, Pittsburgh, PA

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Tell me why did you attended the National Bike Summit? I wanted to meet with other youth bike educators and LCI’s (League Cycling Instructor), connect with other women in the industry, discuss and challenge the equity of the work we all do, lobby our state senators for people-centric safer streets and to bike around DC! Being around a lot of bike advocates is empowering and fun!

What are some easy ways for people to get involved and support an organization like yours? Thanks for asking! It’s easy, you can: 1: Donate or become a member. You can become a monthly sustainer or contribute annually, 2: Get your business involved with supporting bicycling, 3: Volunteer at our big events like OpenStreetsPGH or parking bikes at the bike valets.

Why should people support organizations like yours? We are a membership-based organization and we need the support and participation of the community to keep up the work! Our organizational focus is on advocacy, community, and education. We work for policy change and transformation of our urban core by inspiring and advocating within communities to achieve bikeable/walkable streets. As we work together for safer streets, we also host large community events like OpenStreets that reimagine how a street could be used. We provide accessible education programs and printed resources for youth and adults to learn online or on-the-saddle bike safety and tips. There are a number of ways in which someone can support or participate in this work!

What was your #1 takeaway from the Summit? Youth are the future of bicycling and we must centralize their voices and experiences in advocating for safer streets. The Engaging Youth in Advocacy and Education was my favorite session. It was hosted by young people from Philly’s Cadence Cycling and Neighborhood Bike Works, Arlington’s Phoenix Bikes and DC’s Gearing Up. Everything the youth had to say was on-point, inspiring and direct. “Just because I’m a youth, doesn’t mean I don’t know what I’m talking about” – Theo of 

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Look forward to one more National Bike Summit attendee posts !

 

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National Bike Summit Recap Part 1: Kyle from the Shenandoah Valley Bicycle Coalition

The National Bike Summit is a yearly advocacy event held by The League of American Cyclists. The point of this event is to gather bicycle advocates to coordinate and extend their voices to Capitol Hill and be able to attend sessions to give organizations the tools they need to make a difference within their community and beyond.  The hope is to work together to advance the cycling movement as a united front.

Advocacy is not exciting to everyone. There is a lot of legislation talk, accessing state funding, bond money, fund raising, rumble strip and chip seal discussions, lobbying, non-lobbying, federal advocacy and much more. There are times when my eyes glaze over a little and I just want to run into any battle, sword in the air ready to strike. Action first, talk later, me angry, me use fist… you get it. My point is it takes a very dedicated and patient individual to stand up and fight for cycling/pedestrian infrastructure and safety.

Almost every state attended The Bike Summit. Some states had multiple people to march on the hill and make the case for infrastructure funding to their State Senators and Representatives. Some states had only one representative and sadly, some states were not in attendance at all.

Listen, I’m not going to stand up here on this website soap-box and shake my finger at anyone or anything for my concern of lack of attendance. That’s not going to help. Instead I want to share with you the people I met, why they attended, how easy it is for you to get involved and hope that they can encourage you to go out and contribute to your local bicycle advocacy club (or start one!).

Bike Summit Attendee: Kyle Lawrence
Organization:  Shenandoah Valley Bicycle Coalition, Harrisonburg, VA

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Tell me why did you attended the National Bike Summit? I have attended the summit for the past 7 years and think it is important to travel to Washington DC and to the halls of Congress. For us, it is part of a comprehensive strategy to connect with our local, state, and national representatives

What are some easy ways for people to get involved and support an organization like yours? Our organization is membership centered and the easiest way to get involved is to join or come meet us at one of our events or rides to learn about how bicycles can improve our community. We aim to grow the number of smiles and high-fives in our entire community. Like every bike/walk organization, our work touches on a number of aspects involving transportation and land-use planning, education, encouragement and more. Joining any organization is usually step one. Whether you join or not, you should come out to a trail work day, go on a group bike ride, or grab food and drink with us at our monthly social. Above all, you can bring your ideas and energy to our efforts. All groups want and need is new inspiration, high energy and diverse interests. An honest desire to have fun and improve the community are always welcomed with open arms.

Why should people support organizations like yours? Bicycling and walking are mere tools to build stronger and happier communities. We all walk at some point and likely it could be easier and more comfortable. Our organization aims to do the same with bicycle riding. Whether you decide to bike or not, we aim to make it easier and more comfortable to navigate the spaces between the buildings. We believe safer and more comfortable cities grow more smiles, break down barriers, and make our communities happier and friendlier places to live, work, and play. The bicycle just happens to be a nice way to make it all happen. If you believe in strong, friendly communities, you’ll believe in our work.

 What was your #1 take-away from the Summit? Traveling to Washington DC every year allows me to see the progression in bicycle infrastructure across the District. The first year I attended the Summit, the bicycle lanes in the center of Pennsylvania Avenue were brand new. Since that time, the infrastructure around the city has grown for bicycle riding. Now the District can boast cycle tracks, bike share, and a burgeoning collection of Multi-Use Trails throughout the region, including in the heart of the District. I’ve gotten to watch the progression of the Metropolitan Branch Trail and the Anacostia Trail all wrapped up by the Capital Trails Coalition. Washington DC is an example of the growing national movement for more bicycling and walking. Seeing that around the Summit each year is inspiring and powerful.

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Keep your eye out for Part 2—more stories from all over the United States of advocacy groups and state organizations looking to grow cycling safety!

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Win a TiGr mini+ Titanium u-lock

Contest ended. Congrats to Edward Marshall of Peoria, IL !

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TiGr Lock has partnered with us to give one winner a TiGr mini+ Titanium u-lock. Enter to win below.

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TiGr® mini+ titanium u-lock: the latest in strong, lightweight, easy to use and easy to carry bicycle security.

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Strong. TiGr® Locks are proven to provide protection against all common modes of attack including: bolt cutter, saw, hammer, manipulation, cryogenic and leverage attacks. Certified by independent security experts. Put to the test everyday all over the world since 2011.
Lightweight. The TiGr® mini+ weighs 16.5 ounces (469g). Less than half the weight of a comparable steel u-lock.
Easy to use. The push-button locking mechanism and distinctive shape allow for quick and easy lock-ups.
Easy to carry. The included mounting clip is as easy to install as a water bottle cage, a snap to use and rattle free. Of course, the TiGr® mini+ also fits nicely in a bag or on a rack.
TiGr® Lock titanium bike locks. Certified bicycle security. Award winning product design. Made in the USA.

Complete the survey below by 11:59 p.m., March 15, 2017 to be entered to win. We will choose and notify a winner the following day. Some terms and conditions apply, but don’t they always? Open to U.S. residents, only. Sorry, but that’s not our choice.

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Win a Sunrace cassette and shifter

Contest ended. Congrats to Abe Stucky  of Pittsburgh, PA!

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Win a Sunrace CSMX8 11-46 11 speed cassette and a DLMX30 11 speed rear trigger shifter. Shift it like you mean it, enter to win below.

 

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The Sunrace CSMX8 11-46 11 speed cassette will fit on a standard MTB Shimano freehub body. Weighs 465g. Compatible with SRAM derailleurs and new Shimano XT and SLX rear derailleurs The Sunrace DLMX30 11 speed rear trigger shifter is Shimano compatible and weighs 139g.

Complete the survey below by 11:59 p.m., March 08, 2017 to be entered to win. We will choose and notify a winner the following day. Some terms and conditions apply, but don’t they always? Open to U.S. residents, only. Sorry, but that’s not our choice.

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Win a Pactimo Reflective Kit

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Pactimo has partnered with us to give one lucky winner a pair of Summit Raptor 2.0 RT Bib Shorts and a Summit RT Jersey. Enter to win below.

 

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Pactimo, a Colorado manufacturer of premium cycling apparel, has developed this endurance kit for cyclists who regularly ride 6+ hours at a time or who want the ultimate in comfort. A good pair of padded shorts can make a world of difference on long distance rides and these bibs are designed for long miles. The kit has a compression fit and Pactimo’s proprietary Reflective Technology (RT) in the arm, rear and leg grippers for increased safety in low light conditions and inclement weather.

Winner can select color, size and gender preference.

Complete the survey below the video by 11:59 p.m., February 08, 2016 to be entered to win. We will choose and notify a winner the following day. Some terms and conditions apply, but don’t they always? Open to U.S. residents, only. Sorry, but that’s not our choice.

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How we Roll: Diamondback in Afghanistan

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Editor’s note: This story first appeared in Bicycle Times issue #19, published in October 2012. Words and photos by Josh Parker.


I wouldn’t consider myself a competitive cyclist by any means, rather a bike enthusiast. The day before I left for Afghanistan, my wife and I found an old, beaten Diamondback priced at $50 at the local used sports shop. A brief haggle and $35 later, we left. The next day, I proudly wheeled our find onto the transport jet and headed overseas with the rest of my unit.

I’m pretty sure everything on the bike was original, down to the tires and tubes. All telling the story of a past life spent under the Arizona sun. Classic lines, a lugged frame and forgiving steel. An actual leather seat long past its prime. This Ridge Runner was one of the first of its kind in 1983.

Scrounged from bits of scrap lying around the compound, I built a rear rack to carry my laundry. Two hose clamps and some bottle cage parts compose the cup holder mounted to the top tube, borne from necessity after a one-handed close call balancing an early morning coffee. New tires after the originals gave way in dramatic fashion one hot afternoon. A “borrowed” saddle from the deserted skeleton of a discount store special when the old seat clamp disintegrated on a rocky road. And plenty of TLC.

More than just a convenience or some easy exercise, this old machine transformed steel and rubber into freedom. A taste of autonomy in a place with precious little. Thanks for the inspiration.

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Win an entry for you and a friend to Old Man Winter Rally

Contest ended. Congrats to:

  • Winner: Jimmy Clere of Colorado Springs, CO
  • Winner: Doug Welscott of Golden , CO
  • Winner: Andre Rethman of West Des Moines, IA

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The Old Man Winter Rally has partnered with us to give three winners the opportunity to win a free entry for themselves and an entry for a friend. Because riding with buddy is good times. Enter to win below.

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Oskar Blues Old Man Winter Rally, is an Epic Winter Adventure Ride in Lyons, ColoRADo on 2/12/17. Choose from a 50km or 100km course each filled with Dirt, Snow, Sweat, and Beer!
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Complete the survey below the video by 11:59 p.m., December 28, 2016 to be entered to win. We will choose and notify a winner the following day. Some terms and conditions apply, but don’t they always? Open to U.S. residents, only. Sorry, but that’s not our choice.

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Win Bike Pogies from Portland Pogies

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Fall is here and for those of us living in seasons… winter is coming. Stay warm and dry and enter to win a pair of Stormbreaker Pogies and a pair of Mosier Pogies from Portland Pogies.

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Pogies create a warm and dry pocket around your hands as you ride. They have a waterproof outer layer, a fleece inner layer, and velcro around your handlebars. The same design fits on flat and drop bars. No need for gloves!

Complete the survey below by 11:59 p.m., November 16, to be entered to win. We will choose and notify a winner the following day. Some terms and conditions apply, but don’t they always? Open to U.S. residents, only.

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Button Up & Bike: Winter Wear

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Were in the thick of it now. Winter. This round of Button Up & Bike is focused on a small group of go-to items that make a big difference in cold conditions. The prevailing characteristics? Warm, water repellent, and wind resistant. Some are an investment, but their functionality outweighs the cost. Many we’ve worn happily for years, biking and otherwise, and they don’t show signs of giving out on us anytime soon.

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Walz Plaid Wool Ear Flap, $33: This 100% wool cycling cap from the Walz Winter Collection is my favorite for the cold months because it keeps the wind out of my ears and looks cute. The flap is generous over the ears and provides more than enough room to tuck away unruly hair. Walz caps are all U.S.A. made and feature many styles and patterns, in addition to personalization options. -Emily

Neck gaiter: A neck gaiter can really help hide from the elements. I really like this gaiter because it’s not squeezing my face, fogging up my glasses while I attempt to breath. This is an old Buff Windstopper that doesn’t appear to be available anymore, but you can pick up a slightly different version with the Bicycle Times logo in our online store. Surly makes a wool, moisture wicking neck gaiter and Marmot has a GORE-TEX gaiter. Both look like they have a similar fit and would get the job done. -Trina

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Ryders Eyewear Via Photochromic glasses: The Via Photochromic glasses automatically adjust to the amount of sunlight you’re currently dealing with. Wearing sunglasses does not always work in the darker winter months so a transition or tinted pair of glasses is great for protecting eyes from cold and snow. The Via’s have wrap-around coverage and fit under my helmet with issues. Retail price: $100. There is a less expensive version of the VIA with a non-transition lens tint, designed for medium to bright light for $50. -Trina

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Wool jersey: This is a must for my cycling closet. The Bicycle Times wool jersey has three back pockets and is made of merino wool. Merino wool is soft, comfortable and warm. I’ve had my wool jersey for three years and have put it through the wringer. A few minor sewing repairs have been in order, mostly due to battles with a thorn bush. Price is $125, but on sale right now for $90. -Trina

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SmartWool NTS Mid 250 Baselayers, $100: Merino wool is the queen of all baselayers. Who can argue with apparel that’s warm, moisture wicking, and odor resistant? SmartWool baselayers come in mid, light, and micro weight. I’ve found the mid-weight Zip T and Bottom the ideal candidate for cold weather, but because merino is ace at temperature regulation I can wear it comfortably all day. I like the high quarter-zip collar to vent or block the wind and unlike some long underwear tops, this one is presentable when worn solo. -Emily

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Bar Mitts, size small, $75: How I pedaled through winters past without these things, I’ll never know. What a difference! Wind and moisture be gone, these neoprene sleeves are the answer to cold cycling hands. Most days I wore only a pair of mid-weight gloves and my hands were toasty; at times too warm! I didn’t have any issues shifting or braking, but I’d recommend sizing up to a medium for a little extra space and ease of getting your hands in and out while riding. There are also versions for drop bars or flat handlebars. I’m confident that these neoprene sleeves will keep my hands happy for years to come, making them well worth $75. Or, scoop up a pair on closeout for $45! – Emily

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Outdoor Research Aspect Jacket: Any softshell is great for cycling, but I’m partial to the Outdoor Research Aspect Jacket due to its large chest to waist vents. I begin my ride with them closed and unzip as my core temperature rises. The body is roomy compared to your average softshell making it great for layering; I often wear two wool shirts and a fleece vest underneath. The collar and waist have an elastic drawstring to trap heat in and the bright color is good for daytime visibility. Outdoor Research no longer makes this jacket but the Showers Pass Portland Jacket has similar characteristics at a price of $175. -Emily

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Novara Stratos Gloves: I have trouble keeping my extremities warm in the winter, especially on a windy day, but these waterproof Novara gloves do just the trick. The elastic cuff allows me to cinch down over my jacket keeping the heat in and the elements out. I’m a one finger on the brakes kind of person so I prefer to have my middle and index finger separate. Unfortunately, the Stratos are no longer available in women’s, but the men’s are still out there for $38, and they’re tech compatible. -Emily

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Hiking boots and wool socks: Hiking boots are generally what I wear in winter or rainy weather. These LOWA boots have GORE-TEX lining, are lightweight, waterproof and breathable. A pair of good boots with wool socks (sometimes 2 socks), result in happier feet. The LOWA Bora GTX I’ve had for 2.5 years and they’re still in great condition. A good pair of long-lasting hiking boots will cost you about $120-$250+. -Trina

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Craft Women’s PXC Storm Tight, $125: These Craft tights are breathable and warm, making them great for both city riding and mountain biking. They’re 100 percent poly, with a super soft lining and a wind resistant front. The stretch fabric and ankle zip allows me to easily pull them on over long underwear or jeans. They also have an opening by the knee that provides a little more movement while pedaling. -Emily

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Vittoria Arctica MTB, $245: I had trouble finding women’s SPD cycling shoes that were winter friendly in a size 6.5, so I was thrilled to stumble across the Vittoria Arctica MTB. You’ll usually find me in my hiking boots on city commutes, but I wear these for longer rides as well as for mountain biking. The waterproof membrane and neoprene top keeps the moisture out and the knobby sole keeps you from slipping around at the store or in the woods. Vittoria offers narrow and wide widths as well as low volume upon request. -Emily

Want to ride all winter but on a tight budget? Check out our post Winter Riding on a Budget!

Now go ride!

Don’t let us keep you, button up and bike!

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