Review: Currie Tech eFlow E3 Nitro

Curie Tech is not a newcomer to the electric bike market. Started in 1997 as an e-bike only manufacturer, the brand is now owned by the Accell Group, an international corporation with a growing portfolio of over a dozen bicycle brands, including Redline and Raleigh.

Review: Cleverhood Rain Cape

Since testing a rain cape from the Center for Appropriate Transport for issue #22, I’ve become a convert. I love wearing a cape when it’s pouring, staying comfy and dry underneath but not feeling like I’m encased in a plastic bag. It’s like wearing an umbrella, but less cumbersome.

Review: Trek T80+ GL

The world of e-bikes can be confusing for riders looking for basic, simple transportation. Trek’s T80+ is about as uncomplicated as things get, with a basic drivetrain, no throttle, and a very simple motor control unit.

Review: Jones Bikes Bend H-bar

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The new Bend H-bar from Jeff Jones builds on a legacy of creative tinkering started over a decade ago by the man himself. The idea behind the new $85 Bend H-bar was to create a svelte version of his signature Loop H-bar without. Less material means less places to mount things like GPS, lights, bell and other gadgets, but, like Swedish design, sometimes cutting things down to their essence makes for a better product.

Read our full review.


Review: Kelty Ignite DriDown sleeping bag

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When you’re camping out in winter, your sleeping bag is one item you do not want to skimp on. The Ignite Dridown 0 bag makes use of Kelty‘s new DriDown coated down, which helps retains the fluffy features’ loft and warmth. While I certainly didn’t sleep out directly under the rain, I did get it plenty moist on some rainy nights to be convinced that DriDown works. Another bonus: if you’re on an extended journey, it also dries more quickly, which is essential when you have limited opportunities to dry your gear.

Read our review.


Review: Sierra Designs Super Stratus jacket

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There’s no denying the superior warmth of natural goose down, but it doesn’t exactly play nice with moisture. A synthetic insulation handles perspiration and precipitation, but doesn’t compress as easily and doesn’t offer the warmth to weight. Enter DriDown, a down treatment process that treats the fibers with a hydrophobic polymer at the molecular level to repel moisture. It stays drier, retains loft better and dries faster than untreated down.

Read our full review.


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