First ride: Tern Eclipse S18

tern-s18-1

Maybe you know the drill on folding bicycles, a.k.a. folders. Easy to store, easy to transport, and fun to ride! The perfect solution for the urban environment.

Folders come in many configurations, from tiny-wheeled singlespeeds to this one, perhaps the mother of all folders. The Tern Eclipse S18 is the zombie-apocalypse-surviving*, Swiss army knife of folders. It has everything you could want in an ultimate urban-assault vehicle. 18 speeds, fat tires on 24-inch wheels, disc brakes, racks, fenders and generator lighting. And to top it off a stealthy-yet-gorgeous neutral paint scheme.

This leaves very little to think about. I’m ready to go anywhere, with or without cargo, in the rain and/or dark of night. Heck, I could go on an extended tour on this if I wanted. Like Tern says, Zombie-ready.

Take a closer look.

Print

Review: Currie Tech eFlow E3 Nitro

currie-tech-1

Curie Tech is not a newcomer to the electric bike market. Started in 1997 as an e-bike only manufacturer, the brand is now owned by the Accell Group, an international corporation with a growing portfolio of over a dozen bicycle brands, including Redline and Raleigh.

Regardless of ownership, Currie has over 15 years of experience building e-bikes, and it shows in the Nitro. Unlike many e-bikes that give off a utilitarian vibe, the Nitro looks and feels sporty. The oversized oval tubing, integrated head tube suspension and all-black components add up to a sleek, sturdy and speedy-looking bike.

Read the full story

Print

Review: A’ME Heated Grips

amegrips-1

Heated grips? This sounds like the kind of thing that would be either hokey or over-the-top luxurious. But they come in handy (no pun intended) for motorcyclists and snowmobile riders, so why not bicyclists as well? A’ME happens to make some very high-quality and effective grips that can keep your hands happy through the winter.

Read the full story

Print

Review: Tektro HyRd hydraulic brakes

trp-hyrd-1

Mountain bikes have been reaping the benefits of hydraulic disc brakes for years now, and while they were finicky at first, the products available now are virtually maintenance-free. When they first began appearing on road bikes, mechanical discs were the obvious stop-gap—a brake cable is a brake cable, after all. But now that discs are becoming more prevalent, roadies want the benefits of hydraulic fluid, too.

Read the full story

Print


Back to Top