Letter: ‘Leave the bicycle alone!’

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We love getting feedback from our readers, and believe me when I say we read every email, postcard and handwritten letter. I especially appreciate the handwritten, because it takes more time and contemplation to communicate one’s thoughts.

After taking over as editor in late March, I had some decisions to make. First, we wanted to maintain the same general vibe the magazine has exuded since its inception in 2009, while introducing some new sections. One of these includes reportage on the electric bicycle scene, one that—like it or lump it—is newsworthy and not without merit.

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‘The Mountains Don’t Care’ – A Tour Divide recap

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I haven’t been able to sleep. Every night I wake up, thinking that I still have more miles to ride to the border.

“No, Colleen already picked you up, it’s over,” I tell myself. Then the sun comes up and my legs are rubbery.

Tour Divide was monstrously hard. I thought that I understood how difficult it was going to be, but based on my past experience, that just wasn’t possible.

I always thought “Yeah it’s a long ride, but there’s hardly any singletrack. It’s all dirt road. So it’s probably not that bad.”

I was so far off.


Editor’s note: Montana is a former intern at Bicycle Times and longtime friend-of-the-mag, so we were especially proud when he completed the 2,700-mile Tour Divide this summer in his first attempt. No stranger to big rides and crazy adventures, Montana ultimately finished ninth overall on his singlespeed Surly Krampus in 22 days, four hours and 21 minutes. You can follow along with all his adventures on his blog, The Skrumble.

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Meet the Oregon Manifest winner – Denny

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If you could have the ultimate urban commuting bike, what features would it have? Fenders, racks, lights—those are a given, but the goal of the Oregon Manifest design competition was to push innovation and integration even further.

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Five teams were chosen, and one was voted the winner by the public. Meet Denny, the bicycle conceived of and built by TEAGUE and Sizemore Cycles. Based it Seattle, the team included all the features that integrate safety and practicality in a revolutionary package.

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Love folding bikes? Apply to become a Dahon Explorer

Since 1982 Dahon has been designing and building folding bicycles that have taken people on two wheels to places that they never thought possible. Now the brand is looking for a few of those Explorers to become ambassadors of the folding bike lifestyle to inspire others to take a trip short or far. Now through August 20 anyone is welcome to apply. Those selected will receive Dahon products to promote online.

Print Learn how to apply here.

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Voting now open for Oregon Manifest project bikes

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Which will be the “ultimate urban utility bike?” Five bike custom bicycle companies partnered with five industrial design firms to build their vision of that ideal, and now you get to decide which will make it into production by Fuji Bikes.

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Teams from five cities revealed their projects last week and now voting is underway online to determine the winner of the 2014 Oregon Manifest challenge.

See the entries and cast your vote here.

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Video: Whole Foods in Brooklyn begins delivery by bike

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The Whole Foods at Third and 3rd in Brooklyn already has an impressive track record of sustainability initiatives, including solar panels and wind turbines, but its latest project sure looks like the most fun.

Partnering with People’s Cargo, the store is readying specially built Bullitt cargo bikes with e-assist motors and refrigerated boxes. Delivery charges vary based on how far you are from the store, but if you don’t have your own cargo bike, grocery shopping has never been easier!

Watch the video to learn more.

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Modify Watches let’s you rep your favorite cycling brand, or go full custom

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I’ll admit I’m a bit of a watch nut so I was I wanted to share this new timekeeping option for cycling fans – or really anyone who wants something unique. Everything these days is about standing out from the crowd. Brands like Timbuk2 and Chrome offer custom products, and even Trek is in on the action with its Project One bikes.

Modify Watches was launched from a crowd-funding effort and offers stock or custom watches for less than $100. You can choose a pre-made template, use the online configuration to build your own, or even send in your own design and have it printed on the watch face. The cycling industry is getting in on the action with plenty of brands and styles to choose from.

Modify has made custom watches for SRAM,Pinarello, Ritte Racing, Hodala Cyclocross Team,Cyclehawk, Godspeed Courier and Levi’s GranFondo to name a few. Shops such as One On One Bicycle in Minneapolis and West End Bikes in Portland are signed on to carry custom watches as well as stock options. If you’re a brand or bike shop, get in touch with Modify to learn about making your own.

Want to let loose on the weekend but need to be serious at the office? You can purchase an extra strap for just $15 and switch the face out in seconds.

What do you think? Should we make a Bicycle Times watch?

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Blackburn welcomes class of 2014 Blackburn Rangers

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Created in 2012 to embody the culture of adventure, the Blackburn Ranger program supports cyclists that the brand admires on their journeys along the Pacific Coast and the Great Divide. This year, the brand has added four new adventure cyclists into the 2014 Blackburn Ranger “Out There” program.

To continue the legacy and spirit that Founder Jim Blackburn built in 1975, the Ranger program is created from a simple and effective people-and-product-first approach with everything it touches. This no-nonsense style provides in the field product development feedback that gets fast-tracked for future innovation and also places community first. Ultimately, the program encourages everyone to ‘get out there.’

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