Trina Haynes

Trina Haynes

Title

Advertising Sales Manager/Sponsorships/Partnerships

Yeah, but what do you ACTUALLY do around here?

I run the Ad Sales department here at Bicycle Times and our sister magazine, Dirt Rag. With my amazing sales team, we work together to communicate the many benefits of advertising within our publications. Responsibilities include; print and web ads, trade shows, sponsorships, reader demographic analysis, surveys, digital edition hyperlink/ video proofing, team and advertiser relationship building, and more. Being part of the Marketing duo I am involved in coordinating and fulfilling beneficial partnerships and events.

What do you think about when you're riding your bike?

Nothing and everything.

How would you rate your coffee consumption on a scale of 8-10?

I take coffee consumption to 11.

Complete this sentence: "My other bike is …"

TIE-Fighter

What are you eating, drinking, reading, or fearing these days?

Dried mango, pitas, avocado and whatever is growing in the garden. Drinking Bushmill's Irish Honey Whiskey and Ginger Root Tea. Reading "Generation T", "The Joy of Vegan Baking", "Saved" and "Last Child in the Woods". Ongoing fear of my kids projectile vomiting on me.

Elvis or the Beatles?

The Beatles

Say something profound and meaningful in exactly seven words…

In Tokyo they sell toupees for dogs.

I like your answers. How can I get in touch with you?

412.767.9910 x101

Email me

Roundup: Three pairs of women’s riding pants from Giro, Club Ride and Ibex

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Though it may come as a surprise to some, women do ride bikes. We’ve all heard that number is growing (Hooray!). They also, sometimes, wear pants. As a lady in the bicycle industry I’m frequently asked by other ladies I know, who ride either occasionally or everyday, where are the women’s specific cycling pants? Pants that don’t look like a riding kit or have a chamois? Does such a thing exist?

Yes it does.

Here are three pairs of women’s pants that I’ve been using on and off the bike this spring that I think are pretty awesome.

See them here.

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Telling the Women’s Story

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Combine two key outdoor industry organizers, mix in the growing purchasing power of women and you get The Women’s Story, a cycling and outdoor media event, with a splash of fashion. I headed out to New Jersey to see what was new in the world of women’s outdoors gear.

Throughout the day attendees from multiple media backgrounds had the opportunity to experience and learn about different outdoor activities: yoga, hiking, biking, stand-up paddleboarding and fly fishing to name a few.

Read the full story

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Join Cyclofemme in the celebration of women in cycling on May 11

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Riding with the kids at our 2013 CycloFemme ride.

No matter what type of bike you ride, or how often or far you ride, CycloFemme is a day for all women cyclists. It is also a day for anyone who supports women on bikes to join the rides as well. The goal is to create a unified voice for women’s cycling by building a tribe of riders who recognize the need to empower one another and build a supportive community.

Learn more about Cyclofemme here.

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Clif Bar goes gluten free

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Clif Bar has joined the gluten free craze and released 5 new flavors of MOJO snack bars. These bars are made with organic fruits, whole nuts and dark chocolate. Each bar is 70 percent organic, under 200 calories, 4grams

These MOJO bars come in 5 flavors: Cranberry Almond, Wild Blueberry Almond, Coconut Almond Peanut, Dark Chocolate Almond Sea Salt and Dark Chocolate Cherry. The standard price is $1.49

Being gluten free myself I’m stoked to see another bar on the market that has good flavor and fits in my jersey pocket. The Cranberry Almond and the Dark Chocolate Almond Sea Salt are my personal favorites out of the five. Have you tried them yet?

 

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Review: Bike Friday Tandem Traveler XL

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Tandems have been bringing together the mighty cycling power of two since the late 1800s, and Bike Friday has been building tandems since the co-founders’ very first in 1987.

As a mom of two kids, functionality and reusability are often paramount when I look for new products. I had been on the hunt for a tandem that could accommodate my 11-year-old daughter, Darby, as a stoker over the next few years, then have the honor be passed down to her younger brother. Bike Friday’s Traveler XL seemed like a good choice, as it is designed to fit a captain’s height range of 5-foot-8 to 6-foot-5, and a stoker height range of 3 feet to 6-foot-5. Not only could my kids join forces with me on adventures, but my hubby and I could also ride together.

Read more about the versatile Traveler XL here.

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‘Bike. Camp. Cook.’ serves up delicious recipies for the road

One my favorite things to do when long distance riding or bikepacking is consuming mass amounts of food. Tara Alan, author of “Bike. Camp. Cook” and I have this in common. While Tara and her husband spent two years traveling on bike from Scotland to Southeast Asia, she was determined to cook from scratch and she put all her tips, tricks and recipes into this book.

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My husband and I try our best to travel as light as possible. This means often sacrificing my husbands healthy, home cooked meals to eat from freeze dried packs, gel packets or gas station junk food. I was excited to get my hands on this book in hopes to school myself on a little from-scratch, camp cooking.

Keep reading.

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Review: Osprey Pixel Port backpack

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Raise your hand if you have a bag obsession. Me! Me! Backpacks are great for my shorter rides and I’ll take a two-strap pack over a briefcase for work any day.

The Port in the name refers to a clear window under the main flap, designed for accessing a tablet’s screen without removing it. This could be a great feature for folks who use public transit or need to find directions around town; either way, not having to take out your electronic device during a rushed time period is very cool. For me, the front window was useful for displaying my “to do” lists everyday. Open the bag and—BAM!—list of things I should have done yesterday.

Click here to read more.

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Trina’s favorite handmade bicycle jewelry

By Trina Haynes

As a bike lover and advocate, I enjoy showing off my love for bicycles anywhere and everywhere. I can’t walk into a shindig with my bike as a hat, so I indulge in bicycle related jewelry and accessories. There is a plethora of companies big and small offering cycling-related jewelry these days. You can find recycled inner tube jewelry, stainless steel and glass pendants, blinged-out chain bracelets, upcycled headset necklaces and much, much more.

Today I want to share a few of my favorite and most frequently worn bicycle-related jewelry items. Almost everything handmade I’m a fan of, and if you involve a bike or bike-related product in the design and I will have a hard time controlling the urge to spend.

Elizabeth Klevens makes handmade fused glass, bike mosaic and sterling silver pendants in a multiple of styles. One of my favorites is the circular “Ride Like a Girl ” necklace that goes for $35. You can add in a satin cord with a stainless steel clasp for $10 more. If you’re into mountain biking she has a “Singletrack Mind” in the same cut, just for you. Her gorgeous, handmade necklace pendants range from $35-$75. You can find them here.

Another one of my favorites is Becky Tesch’s handmade, recycled innertube cuff bracelet. This one is cut into a flower design and I have taken such a liking to it, I wear everyday. Dress it up or dress it down, either way it looks pretty swank. She also makes innertube necklaces and earrings, as well as a variety of colored chain bracelets. You can find her wares here.

Last on the list, earrings! I used to only wear earrings on special occasions, but when a friend sent me these innertube earrings cut to look like feathers, I started wearing earrings again just so I could wear these a couple times a week. Unlike real feather earrings, these inner tube ones will, hopefully, not be attacked or eaten by your cat. They are also sturdy enough to handle a helmet strap and not fall apart. I do not know where he got them, only that they are mine now. (Thanks Andrew!) Here is a link to the ones that looks the most similar to mine

Have a few of your own favorites?! 

 

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My kid won’t ride a bike!

By Trina Haynes

Some kids pick up a bike at a young age and it’s instant kismet, and others… well… not so much.

My 11-year-old daughter has shown minimal interest in bicycles since her first introduction at age three. As soon as we sat her on her little plastic scoot-style bike, with joyous faces “she’s going to be a little ripper!”… Nope. Screaming and clamoring to get off this evil, vampiric contraption followed suit.

We tried just letting the toddler bike sit there and maybe she would become interested. Nope.

We tried “Look, Mommy and Daddy ride bikes. Wheeee!”. Nope.

This went on for years. She eventually gave into some enjoyment in her bike trailer. Then she graduated to a tag-along, but would never sit on her own training-wheeled bike. Finally, I think at age eight, she started to cruise around on a 10-inch with training wheels, but only in the house and of course it was way to small for her.

By age nine she loved going on rides, as long as it was she was attached to someone else, trail-a-bike style. 

At that point we bought her a fancy new bike, which she picked out. She loved it and agreed to practice gliding on it. We dropped the seat, took the pedals off and she was off. Once she understood the concept of balance and gliding on a bike, with a few glide crashes under her belt, we made the decision that the pedals must go on regardless of her refusal.

If you’re a parent, you probably have a good idea of the repercussions. Boycott the bike! Sigh… Eventually (talking at least a month or two) she gave in to just gliding with the pedals on. Her little brother, gliding around, happy as can be, definitely helped.

This went on for months, refusing to touch or put her feet on or near the pedals while gliding. I take full blame for the stubborn gene she has. Then, last weekend, the hubby and I couldn’t take it anymore. The parental foot went down! “We are going to learn to pedal today! And it’s going to be amazing! (Dammit!)”

A few hours of crying, attitude and excuses occured…. Then, tears running down her cheeks and puffy-eyed, she got on her bike.

First we practiced getting the feet up on the pedals while gliding, not even pedaling just sitting them there. Then brakes and feet down, means you stop. Continuing to remind her, “you control the bike, it’s not going to do a back-flip on you, or bust out some kung-fu action to knock you off.” That little step was mastered quickly. Phew, step 1 done!

Then, running along side her, encouraging her to do a pedal stroke. This took hours, one pedal stroke (yeah!), then three (heck yeah!). We continued with this for two days, a good majority of the day, taking breaks, drinking, eating, and trying again and again. Until this…

Of course, I was wiping away motherly proud tears and doing the happy dance in my head. My point is every kid will enjoy riding a bike, no matter how intimidated and afraid they might be and sometimes it is good to let kids take riding a bike at their own pace. And sometimes they need a big push.

It makes me very sad to see reports that children riding bikes in the United States is dropping substantially every year. School districts are not allowing kids to ride bikes to and from school anymore. It infuriates me that adults who as children rode and played in the streets now yell at kids from cars for doing it. Why?!

People tell me, “Times have changed, Trina.” Yes, we changed the times. Let’s change them back! I want my kids to be able to ride up and down the sidewalk and not be panicked about the cars doing 40mph in a 25mph zone, or be able to send them to an empty parking lot and not be worried a car is going to come flying through there to take a shortcut. It wouldn’t just be terrible if we all slowed down, just a little, would it?

Get out there and get your son or daughter, niece or nephew, a grandchild, your godchild or some young human being, and get them to ride at least twice a week. This is your mission for a better bike tomorrow.

 

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