Eric McKeegan

Eric McKeegan

Title

Tech Editor

Yeah, but what do you ACTUALLY do around here?

Wrangle review products, wear wool, ranting, winning messiest desk competition.

What do you think about when you're riding your bike?

Often, and blissfully, nothing at all.

How would you rate your coffee consumption on a scale of 8-10?

No cream, no sugar.

Complete this sentence: "My other bike is …"

1988 KLR

What are you eating, drinking, reading, or fearing these days?

Eating: Tacos. Drinking: Porter.

Elvis or the Beatles?

Elvis

Say something profound and meaningful in exactly seven words…

The Beatles, most overrated band in history.

I like your answers. How can I get in touch with you?

Email me

First Look: Raleigh adds new models, expands for 2015

©Earl Harper

Raleigh looks to have a very interesting selection of bikes for 2015, including new road, adventure and mountain bike models.

The bike above, the Grand Prix, wins my “most interesting” award. If you look closely, the Reynolds 530 butted steel frame uses the Ritchey Break-Away system, so this bike can pack away in an small enough bag to escape airline fees. It also is equipped with Campagnolo Veloce, a rare spec these days, and even more rare on a mid-priced bike. The frame includes rack and fender mounts, and is designed for 28mm tires. The $2,300 MSRP includes a travel bag.

See the rest of the lineup here.

Print

First look: Green Guru FreeRider pannier

greegurupack-1

For the most part, we stay out of the Kickstarter/crowd sourcing fray, letting the crowd decide if the products are worthy. We made a rare exception for Green Guru, an established business, and good folks, too. Not only did we get the “hey check out this new product and Kickstarter”, we got one of the prototypes sent to the office to ride and decide if things are ready.

greegurupack-3

Like most Green Guru products, the FreeRider will be made from mostly recycled materials, in this case either  the pictured scrap nylon from an awning maker ($60), or bicycle inner tubes ($75).The design is a cross between a standard grocery pannier and the X-1 bags from an Xtracycle. When empty, the bag folds flat against the bike, but easily opens up two swallow full grocery bags, bag packs, or a baritone sax.

Read the full story

Print

Retroshift expands and renames itself Gevenalle

gevanalle4

Portland-based cyclocross component maker, Retroshift is now known as Gevenalle. The name is derived from two dutch words and translates to “Give All”. Along with the rebranding, the company is offering two new products, a hydraulic disc brake shifter and the HOUP, a cassette spacer to help prevent mud-induced derailleur-spoke contact.

Read the full story

Print

SRAM introduces more affordable 11-speed mountain group – X1

x1group

There is little argument that SRAM’s 1×11 drivetrains work and work well, at least no argument among those who have ridden them And therein lies the problem, as both the XX1 and X01 groups are very expensive. But now the new X1 group trickles the 1×11 tech down to a lower price point, allowing it to be spec’ed on bikes at much lowe price points, and make sence as an aftermarket upgrade.

See the details here.

Print

Review: Currie Tech eFlow E3 Nitro

currie-tech-1

Curie Tech is not a newcomer to the electric bike market. Started in 1997 as an e-bike only manufacturer, the brand is now owned by the Accell Group, an international corporation with a growing portfolio of over a dozen bicycle brands, including Redline and Raleigh.

Regardless of ownership, Currie has over 15 years of experience building e-bikes, and it shows in the Nitro. Unlike many e-bikes that give off a utilitarian vibe, the Nitro looks and feels sporty. The oversized oval tubing, integrated head tube suspension and all-black components add up to a sleek, sturdy and speedy-looking bike.

Read the full story

Print

Review: Dahon Formula S18

dahon-formula-1

This bike isn’t like most folding bikes. On first glance, it looks similar to the standard 20-inch-wheeled folder seen on the streets and public transportation in every city. Closer inspection reveals some standout features: disc brakes, high-end Schwalbe road tires, and an 18-speed drivetrain with gearing suited to spirited riding.

The ease with which the Formula folds—a trait of the highest importance—reflects well on Dahon’s three decades of folder manufacturing experience. Within a few attempts I had the Formula folded up in under a minute. A small magnetic clasp keeps the bike closed when carrying it, and when closed, it supports itself upright. High marks all around, particularly for the simple and sturdy metal folding pedals.

Dahon designed the Formula for riders “with tougher commutes that demand speed, portability and endurance.” Claiming to fit riders from 4-foot-8 to 6-foot-4, the handlebar and seat height adjust easily with quick-release levers. I found the handlebar height adjustment particularly useful—slide it up for comfort and a heads-up position for short trips, drop it down for more speed and leverage on longer rides. The frame has mounting points for a rack and fenders, and Dahon sells versions of each designed specifically for 20-inch wheels.

Read the full review here.

Print

Review: Jamis Quest

jamis-quest-1

Jamis, continuing on even after steel road bikes seem to have fallen out of favor. In fact, this 2013 model marks the 25th anniversary of the Quest name. Built with an oversize Reynolds 631 tubeset paired with a full carbon fork, this is a thoroughly modern take on the classic steel road bike.

Jamis makes 40(!) different drop-bar bike models, and the Quest may be my favorite. It has mounts for fenders and a rear rack, room for 32mm tires (28mm with fenders) and geometry that is sporty but still comfortable and stable. The drivetrain is all reliable Shimano, mostly from the 105 group, matched up to a Ritchey cockpit and wheels. All proven stuff.

Read the full review here.

Print

Review: Trek Mountain Train 206 trailer

 trek-trailer-3

Trek refers to the Mountain Train 206 as a “pedal trailer,” and that may be one of the more apt descriptions for this type of kid-hauling device I’ve heard. Whatever you call them, these attachments are great equalizers, allowing young kids to keep up with adults while still contributing to forward propulsion.

The Mountain Train 206 gets it name from the wheel size (20 inches) and the gearing (six speeds). The beefy steel frame has multiple mounting points for the handlebar stem and an extra-long seatpost, allowing a lot of adjustability. I was able to fit kids from age four to almost nine comfortably.

Read our full review.

Print


Back to Top