In Print: If It Ain’t Moto, It’s Music

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Words and photo by Kevin Murphy

Through the 1980s and ‘90s, Ross Shafer and Salsa Cycles were a force to be reckoned with. Salsa became one of the most sought-after boutique brands, which made stems, handlebars, quick releases, production and custom frames. But it wasn’t all just great product.

Shafer and his Petaluma, Calif. crew instilled a joyful soul into the brand and everything it touched. Annual festivals, fun apparel, and an ethos they lived and breathed. It was full-on fun, and moto. The incredible popularity and cult status among Salsa bicycle owners would be reason enough to tell the story of Shafer and Salsa. But there’s a hidden track on this LP.

Read the full interview.

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Roundup: Three pairs of women’s riding pants from Giro, Club Ride and Ibex

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Though it may come as a surprise to some, women do ride bikes. We’ve all heard that number is growing (Hooray!). They also, sometimes, wear pants. As a lady in the bicycle industry I’m frequently asked by other ladies I know, who ride either occasionally or everyday, where are the women’s specific cycling pants? Pants that don’t look like a riding kit or have a chamois? Does such a thing exist?

Yes it does.

Here are three pairs of women’s pants that I’ve been using on and off the bike this spring that I think are pretty awesome.

See them here.

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Video: Whole Foods in Brooklyn begins delivery by bike

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The Whole Foods at Third and 3rd in Brooklyn already has an impressive track record of sustainability initiatives, including solar panels and wind turbines, but its latest project sure looks like the most fun.

Partnering with People’s Cargo, the store is readying specially built Bullitt cargo bikes with e-assist motors and refrigerated boxes. Delivery charges vary based on how far you are from the store, but if you don’t have your own cargo bike, grocery shopping has never been easier!

Watch the video to learn more.

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First Look: Felt 2015 lineup with ‘adventure road’, new fat bike

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Felt Bicycles develops bikes in nearly every category with worldwide distribution, an impressive feat for a company with a crew of 32 in its Irvine, California, headquarters. Its 2015 launch for more than 30 journalists from around the country highlighted several Bicycle Times-friendly models alongside the standard high-zoot carbon machines, including e-bikes, endurance, commuting, fat bikes and dirt.

See them here.

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Introducing Salsa’s new Blackbarow adventure fat bike

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When the Salsa Mukluk first burst onto the scene in 2011, it was designed for backcountry exploration moreso than actual mountain biking. Well in the past few years things have changed quite a bit, and as fat bikes have become more specialized, tires have gotten bigger, and customers’ desires have changed, the bikes have had to evolve quickly.

See what makes the Blackbarow unique here.

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First ride: Salsa’s full-suspension fat bike, the Bucksaw

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We had seen it coming. There were spy shots and rumors tossed around about a full-suspension fat bike. In fact, the Bucksaw isn’t even the first one—several smaller brands have built bikes that qualified as “full-suspension”, but this one is different. This is a major brand making a big commitment to a new product segment, and bringing an advanced suspension design with it. Mike Riemer, Salsa’s Marketing Manager, said that Dave Weagle, the creator of the Bucksaw’s Split Pivot suspension, told him it was the most complex project he had ever worked on.

One thing is for sure, this is not a “stealthy” bike. From the big tires to the candy-colored paint, the Bucksaw is breaking a new trail in mountain biking. But how does it ride?

Click here to find out.

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First Impression: Niner RLT9

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Niner’s RLT is inspired by the “Road Less Traveled”, and is perhaps an unlikely leader in the adventure bike trend. There’s a lot to admire about the fresh-looking bike, even without pedaling it: three great color schemes, plenty of tire clearance, carbon fork, internal cable routing, similar airformed tubing to Niner’s AIR9 mountain bike, singlespeed or geared options, integrated fender mounts, rear rack mounts, relaxed geometry and disc brakes all make for an extremely attractive package.

Read more about the RLT9.

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Modify Watches let’s you rep your favorite cycling brand, or go full custom

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I’ll admit I’m a bit of a watch nut so I was I wanted to share this new timekeeping option for cycling fans – or really anyone who wants something unique. Everything these days is about standing out from the crowd. Brands like Timbuk2 and Chrome offer custom products, and even Trek is in on the action with its Project One bikes.

Modify Watches was launched from a crowd-funding effort and offers stock or custom watches for less than $100. You can choose a pre-made template, use the online configuration to build your own, or even send in your own design and have it printed on the watch face. The cycling industry is getting in on the action with plenty of brands and styles to choose from.

Modify has made custom watches for SRAM,Pinarello, Ritte Racing, Hodala Cyclocross Team,Cyclehawk, Godspeed Courier and Levi’s GranFondo to name a few. Shops such as One On One Bicycle in Minneapolis and West End Bikes in Portland are signed on to carry custom watches as well as stock options. If you’re a brand or bike shop, get in touch with Modify to learn about making your own.

Want to let loose on the weekend but need to be serious at the office? You can purchase an extra strap for just $15 and switch the face out in seconds.

What do you think? Should we make a Bicycle Times watch?

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In Pixels: Bicycle Times #30 is here

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In this issue

Coverboy Jeremy Gray shows off his bikepacking skills (and colorfully inked torso) astride a Rivendell Hunqapillar near Glorietta, New Mexico, setting the tone for our most dynamic issue yet. The cover was shot by serial adventurer Cass Gilbert, who’s also friends with feature writer Nicholas Carman, who reports on his European bikepacking experience from the North Sea to the Black Sea, and all points in between.

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Our ghost editor is Ernest Hemingway, the late adventurer and author who inspired us to take advantage of our days on earth. His legacy weaves its way through the pages, which also include tips on avoiding heat stroke and taking better bike photos. We even convinced Keith Bontrager to share his mushroom foraging secrets.

All this and more, now available on iTunes. Print subscribers should start receiving their copies next week. As always, order a subscription and you’ll never miss an issue.

 

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