Eurobike 2014: BRG Sports Invests in MIPS

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Multi-directional Impact Protection System (MIPS) helmet technology has been in existence since 2001, and the Swedish company just received a minority investment from California-based BRG Sports, parent company of well-known helmet makers Giro and Bell. The announcement was made at the 2014 Eurobike Show in Germany yesterday.

Not only will BRG Sports introduce several MIPS-equipped helmets under its own brands, it will continue to license the technology to several competitors, including Scott, POC, and Lazer Sport, among others.

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Shop tour: Ruckus Composites carbon fiber repair

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There is little doubt that has—quite literally—reshaped the mountain bike industry. You can get carbon anything these days: frames, rims, handlebars, brake levers, stems, seatposts, cranksets, chains… ok, maybe not chains, but the Gates Carbon Belt Drive is pretty close.

And while it makes for an excellent structural material, like anything you ride hard, things can break. When you drop three months salary on a new mountain bike (what else would you spend that kind of money on?) it can be a bitter pill to swallow when you realize even the strongest carbon fiber has its limits. That’s where Ruckus Composites comes in.

With more than a decade of carbon fiber repair experience, Shawn Small and his team have made repairing or reviving carbon frames an art form, with exacting OE-style refinishes and modifications to carbon frames.

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Welcome to the team! Steve Boehmke joins Bicycle Times

Longtime industry veteran Steve Boehmke has been hired by Rotating Mass Media—publishers of Dirt Rag and Bicycle Times magazines—as its newest advertising sales account representative. Boehmke is based in Orange, California, and replaces Gary Boulanger, who was named Bicycle Times editor in late March.

Boehmke will handle print, digital and online advertising sales for both publications, including sponsorship development for the annual Dirt Rag Dirt Fest in May, and the new Bicycle Times Adventure Festival in October 2015.

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Boehkme, at right, with Bicycle Times Publisher Maurice Tierney.

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In Print: Mushroom Foraging with Keith Bontrager

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Editor’s note: If you own a Trek, Gary Fisher or LeMond bicycle, chances are a former motorcycle racer and tuner from Santa Cruz, California had design input on the tires and components on that bike. Not only is Keith Bontrager a whiz with engineering, he’s also an expert on mushroom hunting. We asked him for some advice on proper foraging tips to find tasty fungus for the kitchen.


By Keith Bontrager

I don’t have to tell you that there are a lot of good reasons to ride your bicycle: transportation, sport, fitness, head clearing, looking stylish, an adrenalin fix, pub crawls, whatever. They’re all good. One of my favorites is finding dinner.

The thought that comes immediately to most people when I mention wild mushrooms is “you’re insane” (and that’s certainly true in some respects) – there is some edge to this sort of thing. But with a little care you never need to put yourself in jeopardy. Here are some solid rules:

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This Just In: Niner BSB 9 RDO

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Niner is of course best known for its growing line of 29-inch mountain bikes, but the latest few products from the California/Colorado brand expand the boundaries of what a 700c wheel can be. This spring we rode and enjoyed the aluminum RLT 9, a cyclocross/gravel/adventure road bike and really enjoyed its versatility (watch for the full review in Issue #31). Now we’ve just got our hands on the BSB 9 RDO, a carbon fiber sister to the RLT that puts speed ahead of practicality.

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This Just In: Blackburn Central rechargeable USB lights

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A good set of lights is one of the simplest ways to promote your safety on the road. Being seen—and seeing where you’re going—is pretty much the most essential functions of urban cycling. Blackburn Designs continues to expand its lighting options with a new set of USB rechargeable “blinky” lights that pack a lot of technology into a small package.

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Letter: ‘Leave the bicycle alone!’

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We love getting feedback from our readers, and believe me when I say we read every email, postcard and handwritten letter. I especially appreciate the handwritten, because it takes more time and contemplation to communicate one’s thoughts.

After taking over as editor in late March, I had some decisions to make. First, we wanted to maintain the same general vibe the magazine has exuded since its inception in 2009, while introducing some new sections. One of these includes reportage on the electric bicycle scene, one that—like it or lump it—is newsworthy and not without merit.

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‘The Mountains Don’t Care’ – Tour Divide gear rundown

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The stuff. All the things that I’m carrying. When it’s all laid out, it doesn’t look like much for a few weeks of living off the bike. But when I’m pushing it up a mountain road, it feels like a ton.

I’ve never cared about how much my race bike weighed. I’ve always felt that the main difference between a 20 pound mountain bike and a 27 pound mountain bike is about $2,000, and the fact that a heavier bike won’t break when you hit a rock the wrong way.

But this is different. When the dry weight (no food or water) of the whole setup is pushing 50 pounds, I’ve been doing everything I can to save weight. I even bought a kitchen scale to weigh crap. And I’ve been debating the little things: do I need a wool hat if I have a jacket with a hood? Probably not. Saved 150 grams.


Editor’s note: Montana is a former intern at Bicycle Times and longtime friend-of-the-mag, so we were especially proud when he completed the 2,700-mile Tour Divide this summer in his first attempt. Read his epic account of the trip here. You can also follow along with all his adventures on his blog, The Skrumble.

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Book Review: “Tiny Homes on the Move”

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In 1968, Lloyd Kahn worked as Shelter editor for the “Whole Earth Catalog”. In 1973 he published the oversized book “Shelter”, which eventually sold 250,000 copies. Ten years ago he published “Home Work: Handbuilt Shelter”, the sequel, and in 2008, “Builders of the Pacific Coast”. Recently, Kahn published “Tiny Homes on the Move”, and we received a copy.

The 224-page book is rich with color, and not just the Roy G. Biv kind—nomadic life in the 21st century looks mildly familiar in a Lord of the Rings sort of way. The book features 90 ‘tiny’ homes, either floating in the water or rolling on the road. We felt a sort of kinship coming off our recent ‘Chasing Grins’ issue, and devoured the 1,100 color photos and rich descriptions of the families and individuals who’ve decided to live a rather unconventional—but intriguing—life away from the cliche. Bicycling is about freedom, and “Tiny Homes on the Move” takes freedom to a whole new level.

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Express your style with new Nutcase helmets

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The folks over at Nutcase Helmets sure know how to have fun. While keeping your melon safe is serious business, no one does it with more color than the Portland-based company. They have a few new products debuting this week, including the Unframed series and the new Metroride model. Since they are right down the road, I went over to visit the offices and check them out.

See the new helmets here.

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